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Old 11-01-2017, 07:32 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
8,387 posts, read 6,482,368 times
Reputation: 12606

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandstander View Post
The Overland Trail was the most frequently used path to the west in the immediate aftermath of the Civil War. It began in Leavenworth Kansas and terminated in San Francisco. The first large resting place for travelers was Fort Kearney in Nebraska and 35 miles west of that post was a stream called Plum Creek. At the point where the road passed alongside the creek, there was a very large flat stone with writing carved into it.
It read:

"Daniel Boone
1816
Turn stone over for valuable information."

There are at least a half dozen different sources which provide accounts of the pioneers being unable to resist finding that valuable information. They describe how first a dozen men tried to turn it over, then a dozen men plus a mule, and finally unhooking their wagon teams, arranging a complicated series of straps, and pulling the stone over that way.

The bottom of the stone read:

"Daniel Boone
1816
Turn stone over for valuable information."
That was a good one.
How many times you reckon that rock was turned over ?
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Old 11-02-2017, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
48,565 posts, read 21,263,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aliasfinn View Post
That was a good one.
How many times you reckon that rock was turned over ?
This wasn't exactly the information age, so I suppose we can forgive the pioneers for not knowing that Daniel Boone never set foot in Nebraska...nor could have Daniel, who was one of America's most original spellers, have gotten "valuable" and "information" correct.
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Old 11-02-2017, 07:17 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
8,387 posts, read 6,482,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandstander View Post
This wasn't exactly the information age, so I suppose we can forgive the pioneers for not knowing that Daniel Boone never set foot in Nebraska...nor could have Daniel, who was one of America's most original spellers, have gotten "valuable" and "information" correct.
That made me think of that dirty song "Those Pioneers Have Hairy Ears."
I was surprised to find it on Youtube.
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Old 11-02-2017, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
48,565 posts, read 21,263,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aliasfinn View Post
That made me think of that dirty song "Those Pioneers Have Hairy Ears."
I was surprised to find it on Youtube.
Goodness, what ribald, vulgarian folks these pioneers were.
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Old 11-02-2017, 01:02 PM
 
Location: West Virginia
14,548 posts, read 13,045,971 times
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Speaking of Daniel Boone, did you know that he lived in the area that is now West Virginia, east of Charleston in the area now know as Cabin Creek. He lived there from 1788 until 1795.

He moved away because it was getting too crowded for him. Strange but true History.
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Old 11-02-2017, 02:20 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
8,387 posts, read 6,482,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mensaguy View Post
Speaking of Daniel Boone, did you know that he lived in the area that is now West Virginia, east of Charleston in the area now know as Cabin Creek. He lived there from 1788 until 1795.

He moved away because it was getting too crowded for him. Strange but true History.

Squire Boone was his younger brother, he built his own coffin before he died and was buried in a cave in Indiana. His remains were found in 1973.

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/f...=gr&GRid=18853
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Old 11-02-2017, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
48,565 posts, read 21,263,930 times
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'Dr. Livingston, I presume"...is a phrase most are familiar with, if not the details of the famous encounter between Livingston and the journalist, Henry Morgan Stanley, who had gone in search of him.

There is also a presumption that Stanley was a British gentleman, dispatched to Africa to find David Livingston who had gone there in search of the source of the Nile River and was thought to be lost.

Plenty of problems with this saga. First, Stanley's original account of their meeting does not contain the famous "I presume" phrase and appears to have been something Stanley later made up in future descriptions. Second, Livingston wasn't lost. He knew where he was, but not having found the Nile's source, he pressed further and further south in present-day Tanzania. He could have returned anytime he wished.

And finally, far from being an English gentleman, Stanley was a Wales born illegitimate child (real name Henry Rowland) who was passed around to various families for raising, finally being deposited in a Poor House. He ran away and caught a ship to America by offering his service as a cabin boy. The ship docked in New Orleans and while looking for work, Stanley lucked out and encountered a wealthy childless southerner named Stanley who took him into his home and provided for him. Henry took his benefactor's last name as his own.

The elder Stanley then had to travel to Cuba on business and he left young Henry in charge of his Louisiana plantation while he was away. Bored by these duties, and looking for some excitement, Henry abandoned the plantation in July of 1861 and enlisted in the Confederate army. He became part of General Johnston's western army and fought in the battle of Shiloh. Not finding combat to his taste, he allowed himself to be captured on the second day as the rebels were retreating.

He was sent to Camp Douglas in Illinois, which he also found not to his liking. Believing that he would not survive the incarceration, Stanley switched sides and agreed to join the Union army in exchange for his freedom in July of 1862. He was assigned to an artillery unit, but 18 days after his release, he came down with severe dysentery and was mustered out.

He traveled to Cuba to try and find his mentor, but upon arrival learned that the elder Stanley had died. On his own again, he enlisted in the Union navy, from which he deserted in February of 1865. He made his way out west and began a new career as a journalist. He returned to Europe secured a job with a newspaper and was sent on assignment to the Ottoman Empire where he nearly starved and then wound up imprisoned. He talked his way out of jail, returned to America and got a job with the New York Herald. It was this newspaper which sent him on the mission to find Livingston.

After that was accomplished, and promoted to his own benefit by Stanley, he was given a very well funded assignment to trace the course of the Congo River. He set out with 228 companions (four Europeans) and porters in 1874, and 999 days later came staggering out of the jungle with only 114 left alive, Stanley being the only survivor among the Europeans.

Finally, Stanley was recruited by King Leopold II of Belgium to aid in the Belgium takeover of the Congo by masquerading as the head of another scientific exploratory expedition. In this Stanley was successful, gaining agreements from tribal chiefs to allow the construction of trading posts, which turned out to really be forts. Stories of Stanley's cruelty to natives were in no short supply.

So, Stanley was some piece of work, opportunistic, disloyal and dishonest.
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Old 11-03-2017, 05:20 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
8,387 posts, read 6,482,368 times
Reputation: 12606
Curly Bill Brocius, rustler, murderer, and all around outlaw, was also a tax collector for Cochise County Sheriff Johnny Behan. He made other rustlers pay taxes on their stolen cattle. The money went into the sheriff's coffers and added to his salary.
Good luck trying to research this guy. He gets mixed up with other outlaws named "Curly Bill" who were around that area at the same time. He was either born in Texas, Indiana, Missouri or Illinois. I was on a genealogy website that said his grandparents were Greek immigrants that came to this country from Germany but didn't say where they settled. I think they had the right Curly Bill.








Did you know that Thanksgiving was originally planned as a day of fasting and prayer ?
Something to think about this month when you're stuffing yourself with pie and turkey.
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Old 11-03-2017, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
48,565 posts, read 21,263,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aliasfinn View Post
Did you know that Thanksgiving was originally planned as a day of fasting and prayer ?
Something to think about this month when you're stuffing yourself with pie and turkey.
When Thanksgiving was first declared a national holiday by President Lincoln, it was supposed to be gratitude for General Sherman's capture of Atlanta and Rear Admiral Farragut's victory in Mobile Bay.
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Old 11-03-2017, 11:04 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
8,387 posts, read 6,482,368 times
Reputation: 12606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandstander View Post
When Thanksgiving was first declared a national holiday by President Lincoln, it was supposed to be gratitude for General Sherman's capture of Atlanta and Rear Admiral Farragut's victory in Mobile Bay.
Did Sherman get orders to do all that destruction in Atlanta or did he do that on his own ?
They sure made a mess there.
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