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Old 10-11-2018, 08:11 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
5,740 posts, read 4,375,967 times
Reputation: 7039

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1905 The Deadliest Year In The U.S. For Football
Some of those deaths were really strange. One kid was tackled and a weed went up his nostril and penetrated his brain. Another player was kicked in the shin and infection set in and he died.

https://deadspin.com/did-football-ca...ing-1506758181



The victims names

https://tombenjey.com/2011/03/03/nam...-died-in-1905/
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Old 10-15-2018, 10:21 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
5,740 posts, read 4,375,967 times
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Elizabeth Garrett (1885-1947)
She was the blind daughter of Sheriff Pat Garrett, the man who killed Billy The Kid. She wrote the state song for New Mexico.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/...zabeth-garrett
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Old 10-18-2018, 10:24 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
5,740 posts, read 4,375,967 times
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Macon Chronicle (Macon Mo) December 21, 1933

BULLET IN HIS BODY 57 YEARS

Missouri Farmer Coughs Up Pellet Carried Since 1876

Osceola, Mo., Dec. 21---For 57 years J.G. Ripke, a farmer living near the small settlement of Oyer, Mo., about 18 miles west of here, carried a bullet in his body.
A few days ago, while Ripke was working in his fields, he suffered a violent coughing spell. That night he coughed up the half-century-old lead pellet. " In 1876, when I was a young man," Ripke told Mrs. Minnie Reese, circuit clerk, " I went with two acquaintances to a saloon and gambling hall at Dodge City, Kansas. I was playing cards with one of the men whose name was Albright, when a stranger walked in and started shooting at my friend.
One of the bullets struck me under the right arm. The wound soon healed and I forgot all about it until the other day, when I coughed up the bullet."
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Old 10-20-2018, 11:44 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
5,740 posts, read 4,375,967 times
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The St. Louis Republic August 28, 1905

AERONAUT KILLED IN VIEW OF CROWD

As 500 men, women and children stood watching John Williams, an aeronaut, preparing to leap from his balloon at Red House, Ill., opposite Carondelet, yesterday afternoon, they saw him suddenly drop from the trapeze attached to the parachute, and fall several hundred feet to the ground.
Williams landed in a field not far from the point of ascension, and when picked up was dead. Blood streamed from his ears, eyes and mouth, and his bones were broken in many places.
The sight of the aeronaut falling to death while his body turned over and over in its descent created a panic among the spectators. Many women fainted, children screamed in fear, and even men turned to avoid the spectacle.
The accident ended the picnic and sent the merrymakers to their homes in St. Louis and East St. Louis. The body of the unfortunate man was carried to a booth on the grounds. The coroner of St. Clair County was notified, but did not visit the scene last evening. Deputy Coroner Hertel will conduct the inquest this morning.
Williams lived in St. Louis, and for several years, it is said, had been an aeronaut. He was engaged yesterday to make an ascension, which was to be a special attraction at the picnic of German societies. The ascension was delayed, it is said, and when Williams was finally ready for his dangerous performance, daylight had begun to fall.
Those who witnessed Williams' death were unable clearly to explain to what his fall was due. It is supposed that he was struggling to release the parachute, which failed to work at the proper moment, and lost his balance on the trapeze.




While I was trying to research this guy I kept getting info about another aeronaut named John who fell to his death less than two weeks after Williams. His name was John August.

Baltimore Balloon Aeronaut’s Deadly Final Performance (1905) | Baltimore Or Less


That stunt must have been pretty popular back then.
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Old 10-22-2018, 06:03 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
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Another aeronaut named John who died in 1905. He didn't fall to his death, he was blown up out of the sky with 7 sticks of dynamite while demonstrating how to drop bombs from a balloon for warfare.

https://www.dailyadvocate.com/news/3...p-at-1905-fair



The Old Greenville Balloon Tragedy and
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Old 10-25-2018, 09:57 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
5,740 posts, read 4,375,967 times
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Kansas City Journal January 7, 1898

AS FROM THE TOMB

St. Louis Man Who Was Supposed To Have Been Buried Last Fall Turns Up

St. Louis, Jan. 6---Last September a bloated "floater" was taken from the river and conveyed to the morgue. At the time, George Wells, living on South Broadway, was missing from his home, and his wife and daughter were left almost destitute. Mrs. Wells was sick in bed, but her 14-year-old daughter called at the morgue and identified the "floater" as the dead body of her father. Mrs. Wells was nearly killed by the shock when she was informed. The body was buried in the potter's field.
Yesterday there came a knock at the door of the Wells home, and in walked Wells, alive and well. He said he had been working in Illinois. He was told of his supposed funeral and today, greatly worried, he consulted legal advice to find whether he is legally dead and barred from his rights as a citizen.





St. Louis Republic July 10, 1905

DEAD MAN PILOTS PASSENGER TRAIN

Body Of Engineer Henry, Killed In His Cab, Hangs Over Throttle, Head Struck Signal Post

With Engineer O.C. Henry dead at the throttle and carrying hundreds of passengers on the Banner Blue Limited No. 11 of the Wabash road, the train ran for more than a mile at top speed before the fireman of the engine discovered his dead companion and brought the train to a stop with a sudden jerk near Taylorville, Ill.
Startled by the sudden stoppage of the train, passengers crowded about the engine and discovered that the top of the engineer's head had been crushed to a pulp from striking a signal post as he leaned from the window. Unnerved by the sight, they refused to allow the train to proceed under guidance of the fireman, and the train rolled into Union Station an hour late, with an engineer sent from Decatur at the lever.
Held at a siding near Taylorville, the train and its passengers was delayed until a special engine came with another engineer. The fact that a hot box existed on a wheel of the tender caused the death of Henry.
Henry had some trouble with a hot box on the engine tender early in the day, and when the train reached Decatur he connected the hose to cool it. After leaving that station he frequently leaned out of his cab and inspected the hot box. As the train was nearing the B&O crossing, one mile north of Taylorville, Henry leaned out to take another look. His head struck a signal post and his death was instantaneous.
When Fireman Tucker discovered the body, the dead engineer was lying against the throttle and he was still in his seat. His right hand had a clutch of the big iron handle, and his position had hardly been changed. After Fireman Tucker discovered his comrade, he grabbed the lever and stopped the train.
It was suggested by several of the passengers that the fireman be permitted to run the train to St. Louis, a distance of 85 miles, but the women in the train, and many of the male passengers were heard to protest strongly.
The body of Henry was taken from the engine at Taylorville and held for an inquest this morning. He was 45 years old, married and lived with his family at Decatur.
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Old 11-03-2018, 06:09 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
5,740 posts, read 4,375,967 times
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Anton Wood (1882-1950)
An 11-year-old psychopath was almost hanged for murder.

Anton Woode, 11 year-old psychopath almost hanged for murder, 1892 - HistoricalCrimeDetective.com



https://www.chieftain.com/news/crime...2e68f75f3.html
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Old 11-04-2018, 04:50 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
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Lucien Maxwell (1818-1875)
One of the largest private landowners in United States history.
Billy the Kid was killed in his son's home.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucien_Bonaparte_Maxwell
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Old 11-06-2018, 07:58 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
5,740 posts, read 4,375,967 times
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The Strange Death Of Ed Delahanty 1903
Hall of Fame baseball player found floating in Niagara Falls river.
Only player ever to win an AL and NL batting title.

https://newsok.com/article/2407611/t...f-ed-delahanty



Was Ed Delahanty murdered?



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Delahanty
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Old 11-07-2018, 11:31 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
5,740 posts, read 4,375,967 times
Reputation: 7039
7 Amazing Facts About President McKinley's Assassination

http://stuffnobodycaresabout.com/201...assassination/
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