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Old 05-25-2018, 04:35 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
6,312 posts, read 4,675,062 times
Reputation: 7729

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Tuffi's Dive
In 1950, a panicked elephant fell out of a monorail in Germany and plunged 40 feet into a river and lived for another 40 years.

https://io9.gizmodo.com/5903042/in-1...ail-in-germany








SS Ayrfield
100 year old ship is now a floating forest

https://mymodernmet.com/ss-ayrfield-...oating-forest/
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Old 05-25-2018, 09:01 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
6,312 posts, read 4,675,062 times
Reputation: 7729
Team Boats
They were boats powered by horses or mules walking on treadmills. The first documented one was in 1791 on the Delaware River by John Fitch.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_boat







Check out these old street sweepers.

A Clean Sweep in a Dirty Business – Vintage Street Sweepers | The Old Motor
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Old 05-26-2018, 05:46 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
6,312 posts, read 4,675,062 times
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Idaho's Parachuting Beavers 1950

The True Story of Idaho's Parachuting Beavers | Time




Video (parachuting starts around 8:15)

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-...tage-from-1950
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Old 05-26-2018, 01:05 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
6,312 posts, read 4,675,062 times
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The Baby Incubators Of Coney Island

How one man saved a generation of premature babies - BBC News







The Silfra Crack, located in the Thingvallavatn Lake in Iceland, is where the continental plates of Europe and America meet. It is the only place where divers can touch both continents at the same time.








Mummified Monkey Found In Minnesota Mall.

http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2018/0...lding-remodel/
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Old 05-26-2018, 08:11 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
6,312 posts, read 4,675,062 times
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The Blue Peacock
Britain's chicken bomb

Chicken Bomb | Now I Know







John Priest (1887-1932)
Survived the Titanic plus 3 other ship disasters.

Titanic's unsinkable stoker - BBC News
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Old 05-27-2018, 05:03 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
6,312 posts, read 4,675,062 times
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The Cyclomer
First amphibious bicycle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amphibious_cycle
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Old 05-27-2018, 12:32 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
6,312 posts, read 4,675,062 times
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Hollie Tatnell
The grave that refused to be moved.

https://chronicles.roadtrippers.com/...ry-grave-road/








Red Killed Yellow 1909
People weren't even safe inside the court buildings from those Rats.

https://headrat.wordpress.com/
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Old 05-27-2018, 01:04 PM
 
3,500 posts, read 4,956,546 times
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1) Fritz Haber, a German Chemist, won an early Nobel Prize for improving fertilizer.

But he also invented poisonous Mustard Gas, and was very enthusiastic about first using it against British soldiers during the Battle of Ypres, Belgium in World War I. His wife (also a scientist herself) was ashamed of his inhumane work, and committed suicide. Fritz hardly seemed to care.

Ironically, Haber was Jewish, so some of his relatives, 30 years later, were killed in death camps, with gas similar to the kind he invented.



2) Edwin Booth, a great star of the stage, once pulled Abraham Lincoln's SON to safety, after the boy had fell onto the station train tracks in Jersey City, N.J......Some time later, Edwin Booth's BROTHER John shot and killed Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theater.
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Old 05-27-2018, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
6,941 posts, read 7,776,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aliasfinn View Post
List Of Pony Express Riders (incomplete)

Pony Express Riders | Pony Express Museum - St. Joseph, MO





Here's one not on the list

James Benjamin Hamilton (1836-1867)

https://old.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/f...&GRid=12167695





I remember reading about one rider who was chased by Indians and was shot by an arrow that pinned his hand to his leg. He managed to outrun them for 20 miles to get to the relay station.
The history of the Pony Express is fascinating, especially considering the short duration that it was actually operational. The average age of riders was 20 years old, but several of them were as young as 14 when they rode the lines. Impressive young men. I doubt that the average 14-year-old today could do the job, even if they knew which end of the horse to face.
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Old 05-27-2018, 05:26 PM
 
1,274 posts, read 928,862 times
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aliasfinn I have to congratulate you on one of the most interesting, fun threads on this whole site! Keep them coming!
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