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Old 03-21-2018, 03:54 PM
 
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An American Presence in Ulster by Francis M.Carroll

APPENDIX D American Presidents with Ulster Origins . Andrew Jackson, the seventh president, – Jackson’s parents, from County Antrim near Carrickfergus, sailed from Larne in  for North Carolina, where Andrew was born in . . James K. Polk, the eleventh president, – Descendent of Robert Pollock of Donegal, who emigrated to Maryland in . . James Buchanan, the fifteenth president, – Buchanan’s parents, from Deroma, near Omagh, County Tyrone, emigrated to Pennsylvania in , where James was born in . . Andrew Johnson, the seventeenth president, – Johnson’s grandfather emigrated from Larne, County Antrim, about . . Ulysses Simpson Grant, the eighteenth president, – Grant’s grandfather, John Simpson, emigrated from Dergina, near Ballygawley, County Tyrone, in . . Chester A.Arthur, the twenty-first president, – Arthur’s father emigrated from Cullybackey, County Antrim, in . . Grover Cleveland, the twenty-second and twenty-forth president, – and – Cleveland’s maternal grandfather, Abner Neal, emigrated from County Antrim in the late eighteenth century. . Benjamin Harrison, the twenty-third president, – Two of Harrison’s great-grandfathers, James Irwin and William McDowell, emigrated from Ulster. . William McKinley, the twenty-fifth president, – McKinley’s great-grandfather, James McKinley, emigrated from Devock, County Antrim, in . . Theodore Roosevelt, the twenty-sixth president, – Roosevelt’s mother was the descendent of immigrants from Larne, County Antrim, in . . Woodrow Wilson, the twenty-eighth president, – Wilson’s grandfather, James Wilson, emigrated from Dergalt, County Tyrone, in  and married Annie Adams of Sion Mills, County Tyrone. . Richard Milhouse Nixon, the thirty-seventh president, – Nixon had Milhouse ancestors from Carrickfergus and Ballymoney, County Antrim, who emigrated about . . George Herbert Walker Bush, the forty-first president, – A Bush ancestor, William Holliday, was born in Rathfriland, County Down, in . . William Jefferson Clinton, the forty-second president, – Clinton had ancestors who emigrated from County Fermanagh in about . . George W. Bush, the forty-third president, – A Bush ancestor, William Holliday, was born in Rathfriland, County Down, in .  

https://muse.jhu.edu/chapter/738369
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Old 03-22-2018, 05:20 PM
 
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You should read the folkways of America. Ulster was so tiny, it could not have that much influence on the US compared to England, Wales and Scotland. I read a piece that mentioned most immigrants came FROM England and Scotland but were left from Northern Irish ports. There were immigrants from the six northern English counties and four Southern Scottish counties, the Ulster stock were roughly 50-50 English/Scottish. Scots/Irish was a term by English- Americans( from the south), Ulster Scots is only 50/50. The term should be Anglo-Scots, Scots-English, British, or as was said in the 1700`s Saxon-Scotch.
That's why General Jackson had Northern English, Yorkshire blood in his veins
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Old 03-22-2018, 05:23 PM
 
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The American south descendants are all ( white descent) from Scottish/English Protestant roots only.
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Old 03-23-2018, 09:50 AM
 
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Originally Posted by England Dan View Post
You should read the folkways of America. Ulster was so tiny, it could not have that much influence on the US compared to England, Wales and Scotland. I read a piece that mentioned most immigrants came FROM England and Scotland but were left from Northern Irish ports. There were immigrants from the six northern English counties and four Southern Scottish counties, the Ulster stock were roughly 50-50 English/Scottish. Scots/Irish was a term by English- Americans( from the south), Ulster Scots is only 50/50. The term should be Anglo-Scots, Scots-English, British, or as was said in the 1700`s Saxon-Scotch.
That's why General Jackson had Northern English, Yorkshire blood in his veins
Aye, that's true but these people were part of the plantation who arrived in Ulster and had children who were born in Ulster. These children grew up in Ulster. General Jackson's brothers were born in Ulster. Woodrow Wilson was another who had family connections in northern England. His grandfather James Wilson was born in Ulster.

The plantation of Ulster took place around the same time as the plantation of Virginia.

The English were at Jamestown. I don't think there were any Ulster-Scots there as the majority of them didn't arrive in America until the 1700s.
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Old 03-24-2018, 03:04 PM
 
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Fair to say, it is Scotland, Northern/ Western England and Ulster protestants that dominate the entire south, these families would have intermingled. I agree, the back country frontier would be dominant Ulster. The Welsh, Southern English most came as quakers ended up in Texas and Arizona. Sam Houston was Ulster-Scots, Daniel Boone was West country English.
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Old 03-27-2018, 03:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by England Dan View Post
Fair to say, it is Scotland, Northern/ Western England and Ulster protestants that dominate the entire south, these families would have intermingled. I agree, the back country frontier would be dominant Ulster. The Welsh, Southern English most came as quakers ended up in Texas and Arizona. Sam Houston was Ulster-Scots, Daniel Boone was West country English.
What do you reckon was the 'line-up' in the civil war? I think it cut across all backgrounds.



On the Confederate side, North Carolina, home of the Ulster-Scots, led all the Southern States in enlisted men, and in killed and wounded. In the North, the pre-eminence goes to Pennsylvania, peopled in great measure by folk with the Ulster blood. The bloodiest single conflict of the war was
fought between two regiments at Gettysburg, the 26th North Carolina Regiment and the 151st Pennsylvania Regiment. Both regiments were practically wiped out. Well might Colonel Johnston say in 1889 : ''The greatest losses in the war occurred when the iron soldiers of North Carolina and Pennsylvania, descendants of the same race and stock, met on the field of battle and locked arms in the embrace of death.''

And to this tribute may be added that of one whose verdict will be questioned by few. The Rev. David McCrea, a Scots minister, on a visit to America, interviewed the great Commander of the Confederate Forces, General Robert E. Lee, and asked of him, ''What race do you believe makes the best soldiers ? '' General Lee answered: ''The Scotch who came to this country by way of Ireland.'' Dr McCrea asked him, ''Why do you say that, General ? '' ''Because,'' replied this great soldier, they have all the dash of the Irish in taking a position and all the stubbornness of the Scotch in holding it.''
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Old 03-28-2018, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
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My grandmother described her father's male line ancestors as "They were Scottish, but came from Ireland to Maryland some time soon after the Arc and the Dove."

Her father was the first-footer for his street into the 20th century.

Last edited by westsideboy; 03-28-2018 at 04:23 PM..
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Old 03-29-2018, 12:57 PM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
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Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
What do you reckon was the 'line-up' in the civil war? I think it cut across all backgrounds.

On the Confederate side, North Carolina, home of the Ulster-Scots, led all the Southern States in enlisted men, and in killed and wounded. In the North, the pre-eminence goes to Pennsylvania, peopled in great measure by folk with the Ulster blood. The bloodiest single conflict of the war was fought between two regiments at Gettysburg, the 26th North Carolina Regiment and the 151st Pennsylvania Regiment. Both regiments were practically wiped out. Well might Colonel Johnston say in 1889 : ''The greatest losses in the war occurred when the iron soldiers of North Carolina and Pennsylvania, descendants of the same race and stock, met on the field of battle and locked arms in the embrace of death.''

And to this tribute may be added that of one whose verdict will be questioned by few. The Rev. David McCrea, a Scots minister, on a visit to America, interviewed the great Commander of the Confederate Forces, General Robert E. Lee, and asked of him, ''What race do you believe makes the best soldiers ? '' General Lee answered: ''The Scotch who came to this country by way of Ireland.'' Dr McCrea asked him, ''Why do you say that, General ? '' ''Because,'' replied this great soldier, they have all the dash of the Irish in taking a position and all the stubbornness of the Scotch in holding it.''
Pretty much an accurate assessment Ulsterman, as the links below bear out.

MOORE COUNTY AND THE CIVIL WAR

The following analysis of Moore County’s participation in the “Great Southern Rebellion” was researched by Mr. Thurman D. Maness of Robbins, NC (1909-2010). He spent a large part of his life searching for information regarding our boys in gray. Thurman harbored the greatest amount of respect for those who put honor above all in their struggle to protect home and family from what they perceived as true Northern aggression.

https://www.companyh26th.com/moore-c...civil-war.html

Company H 26th Regiment N.C. State Troops - THEY WERE BROTHERS IN WAR AND IN PEACE

Confederate Section Oakwood Cemetery Raleigh, NC

One should never think of Gettysburg without remembering North Carolina's 26th Regiment. The courage they displayed those first three days of July, 1863 will live forever in the hearts and minds of their descendants. We know their names but who were they? Who were the wives and children so many left behind? This endeavor focuses on one Company of the infamous 26th Regiment -- Company H -- "The Moore Independents". Our research confirms that they were brothers, cousins, uncles, and even fathers and sons.

CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO FIND THE NEARLY 200 SOLDIERS WITHIN OUR DIRECTORY WHO SERVED IN COMPANY H 26TH REGIMENT FROM THE BEGINNING UNTIL THE END
(ALPHABETICALLY LISTED)

https://www.companyh26th.com/individ...h-26th-nc.html

Pennsylvania, regiments at Gettysburg - The Battle of Gettysburg

The greatest number of monuments on the battlefield are monuments to Union regiments and batteries, placed at the site where the units fought. Several northern states also placed state monuments, and there are a few monuments to northern brigades where all the regiments came from the same state. There are also monuments to the regiments and batteries of United States Army Regulars that fought at the Battle of Gettysburg.

There are fewer Confederate monuments. Because of rules on the placement of monuments and Southern attitudes towards a battle on Northern ground, there are very few monuments to Confederate regiments and none to Confederate batteries on the Gettysburg battlefield. Most Confederate monuments are state monuments erected by the Southern states.

Battle of Gettysburg

The States at Gettysburg Which States Sent Men to the Battle of Gettysburg?

Which States Suffered the Heaviest Losses at Gettysburg?
States Ranked by Total Casualties at the Battle of Gettysburg

The States at Gettysburg
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Old 03-29-2018, 01:16 PM
 
980 posts, read 541,524 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
My grandmother described her father's male line ancestors as "They were Scottish, but came from Ireland to Maryland some time soon after the Arc and the Dove."

Her father was the first-footer for his street into the 20th century.
That pretty well sums up their journey. Known as the border reivers they operated on both sides of the English and Scottish border. Johnstons, Grahams, Elliotts, Armstrongs to name just a few. But King James brought an end to that and so a lot of them headed to Ulster and from there to America.



''first-footer'' I can remember those days. But they had to have black/dark hair .
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Old 03-29-2018, 01:26 PM
 
980 posts, read 541,524 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeIsWhere... View Post
Pretty much an accurate assessment Ulsterman, as the links below bear out.

MOORE COUNTY AND THE CIVIL WAR

The following analysis of Moore County’s participation in the “Great Southern Rebellion” was researched by Mr. Thurman D. Maness of Robbins, NC (1909-2010). He spent a large part of his life searching for information regarding our boys in gray. Thurman harbored the greatest amount of respect for those who put honor above all in their struggle to protect home and family from what they perceived as true Northern aggression.

https://www.companyh26th.com/moore-c...civil-war.html

Company H 26th Regiment N.C. State Troops - THEY WERE BROTHERS IN WAR AND IN PEACE

Confederate Section Oakwood Cemetery Raleigh, NC

One should never think of Gettysburg without remembering North Carolina's 26th Regiment. The courage they displayed those first three days of July, 1863 will live forever in the hearts and minds of their descendants. We know their names but who were they? Who were the wives and children so many left behind? This endeavor focuses on one Company of the infamous 26th Regiment -- Company H -- "The Moore Independents". Our research confirms that they were brothers, cousins, uncles, and even fathers and sons.

CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO FIND THE NEARLY 200 SOLDIERS WITHIN OUR DIRECTORY WHO SERVED IN COMPANY H 26TH REGIMENT FROM THE BEGINNING UNTIL THE END
(ALPHABETICALLY LISTED)

https://www.companyh26th.com/individ...h-26th-nc.html

Pennsylvania, regiments at Gettysburg - The Battle of Gettysburg


The greatest number of monuments on the battlefield are monuments to Union regiments and batteries, placed at the site where the units fought. Several northern states also placed state monuments, and there are a few monuments to northern brigades where all the regiments came from the same state. There are also monuments to the regiments and batteries of United States Army Regulars that fought at the Battle of Gettysburg.

There are fewer Confederate monuments. Because of rules on the placement of monuments and Southern attitudes towards a battle on Northern ground, there are very few monuments to Confederate regiments and none to Confederate batteries on the Gettysburg battlefield. Most Confederate monuments are state monuments erected by the Southern states.

Battle of Gettysburg

The States at Gettysburg Which States Sent Men to the Battle of Gettysburg?

Which States Suffered the Heaviest Losses at Gettysburg?
States Ranked by Total Casualties at the Battle of Gettysburg

The States at Gettysburg
HomeIsWhere, thanks for that information and the links. Kennedy in his books made some mention of NC having the most Ulster-Scots in their ranks.

There is a memorial stone to the Ulster Division who fought on the Federal side and it is an area of the USA it refers to
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