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Old 03-29-2018, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,560 posts, read 7,621,816 times
Reputation: 2770

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
That pretty well sums up their journey. Known as the border reivers they operated on both sides of the English and Scottish border. Johnstons, Grahams, Elliotts, Armstrongs to name just a few. But King James brought an end to that and so a lot of them headed to Ulster and from there to America.



''first-footer'' I can remember those days. But they had to have black/dark hair .
The time spent in Ireland was important enough to these people that it became part of their origin story that was passed on to their descendants. I have read that many in this thread find the term "Scots-Irish" a misnomer, and they have a good point, but in the United States, this group retains an identity that is different than being simply Scottish or Irish.

Interestingly enough my great-grandfather had sandy colored hair. I am not sure if being tall and thin was enough for this to be overlooked, if that specific aspect of the tradition wasn't important by the 20th century, or what. Either way, the tradition survived in the small mining towns of Western Maryland until the middle of the last century.

I suspect the large influx of Scottish and Welsh miners to the region during the middle 19th-early 20th century helped keep the tradition alive. I should note that these people's descendants do not confuse their Scottish ancestors with the Scots-Irish ones. The two groups remain distinct. I have both types in my family line and family tradition has passed down which are which.
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Old 03-30-2018, 01:47 PM
 
982 posts, read 542,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
The time spent in Ireland was important enough to these people that it became part of their origin story that was passed on to their descendants. I have read that many in this thread find the term "Scots-Irish" a misnomer, and they have a good point, but in the United States, this group retains an identity that is different than being simply Scottish or Irish.

Interestingly enough my great-grandfather had sandy colored hair. I am not sure if being tall and thin was enough for this to be overlooked, if that specific aspect of the tradition wasn't important by the 20th century, or what. Either way, the tradition survived in the small mining towns of Western Maryland until the middle of the last century.

I suspect the large influx of Scottish and Welsh miners to the region during the middle 19th-early 20th century helped keep the tradition alive. I should note that these people's descendants do not confuse their Scottish ancestors with the Scots-Irish ones. The two groups remain distinct. I have both types in my family line and family tradition has passed down which are which.
Yes you have a point in your last paragraph. It was said that most of the Scotch-Irish were in favour of the Revolution but many Scots were on the British side and fought against it. Kings Mountain was where a lot of Ulster-Scots fought and where the Scottish general Ferguson (on the British side) was killed.

Their time in Ireland was a struggle for survival. They were surrounded all around by foes and this included the English who brought out the Test Act and also stopped their exports abroad. So they had enough and set sail to the new world. That was in the 1700s but it happened in the 1800s too when over 100,000 left Ulster for America and Canada.
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Old 03-30-2018, 03:14 PM
 
982 posts, read 542,285 times
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This hand for our country and the hand is in the Ulster flag too



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Old 03-31-2018, 11:11 AM
 
982 posts, read 542,285 times
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The Ulster Guard fought on the Federal side so just to even things up a bit


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Old 04-01-2018, 04:45 PM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
4,099 posts, read 3,390,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
The Ulster Guard fought on the Federal side so just to even things up a bit
Very nice Ulsterman, as always, thank you for sharing that with us, sincerely.

For my part, just a small contribution. As always I hope this has not been previously posted here.

Belfast and Nashville - Sister Cities

Belfast and Nashville have been Sister Cities since 1995 and this is a very natural Sister City relationship because Nashville has a strong Scotch-Irish tradition. The founders of Nashville were Ulster-Scots and men and women of Ulster-Scots descent have played an important role in the development of the city.

Belfast and Nashville have been Sister Cities since 1995 and this is a very natural Sister City relationship because Nashville has a strong Scotch-Irish tradition. The founders of Nashville were Ulster-Scots and men and women of Ulster-Scots descent have played an important role in the development of the city.

Nashville's story is an Ulster story too and the Sister City relationship between Nashville, the capital city of Tennessee, and Belfast, the capital city of Northern Ireland, is a fitting reflection of this.

During the 18th century as many as 250,000 Ulster-Scots emigrated from Ulster and crossed the Atlantic to settle in America. In the course of time some of those Ulster-Scots families travelled south to Tennessee.

Ulster - Nashville: Belfast and Nashville - Sister Cities

About the Lexington (Kentucky) Sister Cities Commission

County Kildare, Ireland – 1984

https://www.lexingtonky.gov/about-si...ies-commission
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Old 04-01-2018, 09:06 PM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
4,099 posts, read 3,390,521 times
Reputation: 8651
This endeavor for ancestral research leads to some unexpected and interesting finds (well, to me anyway) and hopefully they will be of use to...someone else as well.

Please stop me when it has run it's course and become uninteresting to you, 'the audience' of such posts; also, if I begin repeating myself here (I see my formatting is getting...haphazard).

The Ulster Americans and Manifest Destiny

Although the Cherokee had sold Kentucky to a Scots-Irishman named Richard Henderson and his Transylvania Company in 1775, some among the natives, Dragging Canoe in particular, resisted giving up their hunting grounds to the settlers.

UlsterHeritage.com - All Things Ulster - Scotch-Irish - Manifest Destiny and the Seed of Ulster

Wilderness Road

After 1770, a surge of over 400,000 Scots-Irish immigrants arrived in the colonies to escape the poor harvest, high rents and religious intolerance of Ulster. Since the better lands had already been taken, they constantly pressed onward to the western frontier of the foothills of the Carolinas.

The flood of Scots-Irish, German, and others immigrants kept coming. Over 200,000 pioneers came over the Wilderness Road, enduring severe hardships. In the winter of 1778-79, the weather was so cold that the Kentucky River froze to a depth of two feet.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilderness_Road
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Old 04-02-2018, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,560 posts, read 7,621,816 times
Reputation: 2770
Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeIsWhere... View Post
This endeavor for ancestral research leads to some unexpected and interesting finds (well, to me anyway) and hopefully they will be of use to...someone else as well.

Please stop me when it has run it's course and become uninteresting to you, 'the audience' of such posts; also, if I begin repeating myself here (I see my formatting is getting...haphazard).

The Ulster Americans and Manifest Destiny

Although the Cherokee had sold Kentucky to a Scots-Irishman named Richard Henderson and his Transylvania Company in 1775, some among the natives, Dragging Canoe in particular, resisted giving up their hunting grounds to the settlers.

UlsterHeritage.com - All Things Ulster - Scotch-Irish - Manifest Destiny and the Seed of Ulster

Wilderness Road

After 1770, a surge of over 400,000 Scots-Irish immigrants arrived in the colonies to escape the poor harvest, high rents and religious intolerance of Ulster. Since the better lands had already been taken, they constantly pressed onward to the western frontier of the foothills of the Carolinas.

The flood of Scots-Irish, German, and others immigrants kept coming. Over 200,000 pioneers came over the Wilderness Road, enduring severe hardships. In the winter of 1778-79, the weather was so cold that the Kentucky River froze to a depth of two feet.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilderness_Road
No complaints from me. I am enjoying reading this thread.
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Old 04-02-2018, 09:02 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,572 posts, read 21,756,199 times
Reputation: 44352
Quote:
Originally Posted by England Dan View Post
You should read the folkways of America. Ulster was so tiny, it could not have that much influence on the US compared to England, Wales and Scotland. I read a piece that mentioned most immigrants came FROM England and Scotland but were left from Northern Irish ports. There were immigrants from the six northern English counties and four Southern Scottish counties, the Ulster stock were roughly 50-50 English/Scottish. Scots/Irish was a term by English- Americans( from the south), Ulster Scots is only 50/50. The term should be Anglo-Scots, Scots-English, British, or as was said in the 1700`s Saxon-Scotch.
That's why General Jackson had Northern English, Yorkshire blood in his veins
Yes. "Albion's Seed"
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Old 04-02-2018, 09:05 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,572 posts, read 21,756,199 times
Reputation: 44352
Quote:
Originally Posted by England Dan View Post
You should read the folkways of America. Ulster was so tiny, it could not have that much influence on the US compared to England, Wales and Scotland. I read a piece that mentioned most immigrants came FROM England and Scotland but were left from Northern Irish ports. There were immigrants from the six northern English counties and four Southern Scottish counties, the Ulster stock were roughly 50-50 English/Scottish. Scots/Irish was a term by English- Americans( from the south), Ulster Scots is only 50/50. The term should be Anglo-Scots, Scots-English, British, or as was said in the 1700`s Saxon-Scotch.
That's why General Jackson had Northern English, Yorkshire blood in his veins
Yes. "Albion's Seed - the Four British Folkways of America" by David Hackett Fischer

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32081.Albion_s_Seed
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Old 04-03-2018, 09:04 AM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
4,099 posts, read 3,390,521 times
Reputation: 8651
Scotch-Irish Americans

From 1710 to 1775, over 200,000 people emigrated from Ulster to the original thirteen American colonies. The largest numbers went to Pennsylvania. From that base some went south into Virginia, the Carolinas and across the South, with a large concentration in the Appalachian region. Others headed west to western Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and the Midwest.

Transatlantic flows were halted by the American Revolution, but resumed after 1783, with total of 100,000 arriving in America between 1783 and 1812. By that point few were young servants and more were mature craftsmen, and they settled in industrial centers, including Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and New York, where many became skilled workers, foremen and entrepreneurs as the Industrial Revolution took off in the U.S.[citation needed] Another half million came to America 1815 to 1845; another 900,000 came in 1851-99.[citation needed] That religion decisively shaped Scotch-Irish culture.

According to the Harvard Encyclopedia of American Ethnic Groups, there were 400,000 U.S. residents of Irish birth or ancestry in 1790 and half of this group was descended from Ulster, and half from the other three provinces of Ireland.

A separate migration brought many to Canada, where they are most numerous in rural Ontario and Nova Scotia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch-Irish_Americans
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