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Old 04-23-2018, 10:15 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
The Nixons were Quakers.

Actually, while many of the Quakers who arrived at the ports of Philadelphia & Wilmington, were from northern England, some were from Ulster, like the Kirks.
Thanks for the info. I'm not au fait with the different faiths. I'm inclined to get the Quakers and the Puritans mixed up. However, there was a man from Ulster who I think was a Quaker. His name was Logan and he encouraged the Ulster people to come to America but later regretted it.

Yes, there are quite a lot of Kirks here.

Have been meaning to mention that there were five ships from Ulster that landed at Charleston in the southern states.
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Old 04-23-2018, 02:25 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
Thanks for the info. I'm not au fait with the different faiths. I'm inclined to get the Quakers and the Puritans mixed up. However, there was a man from Ulster who I think was a Quaker. His name was Logan and he encouraged the Ulster people to come to America but later regretted it.

Yes, there are quite a lot of Kirks here.

Have been meaning to mention that there were five ships from Ulster that landed at Charleston in the southern states.
The Kirks were in County Armagh. One immigrated to Pennsylvania & later two of his brothers came. A fair amount of the Quakers who arrived in Philadelphia, Wilmington, & South Jersey (the southern counties of NJ ) were called Irish Quakers. The Kirks in County Armagh were from Yorkshire. I've read that the name was originally Church.

Some Quakers went to Puritan areas of New England & were expelled. The religon that was more likely to cohabitate with the Quakers was the Baptist members, from what I've found. One family in my tree consisted of a Quaker (one of the Kirks) & his wife (a Buckingham ) who converted from Baptist to Quaker.

I suspect that the reason that there isn't much thought given to the Quakers in Ulster Province is that they were a minority in Ulster & when they came to Pennsylvania they were as likely as not to marry other Quakers who were not from Ulster Province.
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Old 04-24-2018, 08:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
The Kirks were in County Armagh. One immigrated to Pennsylvania & later two of his brothers came. A fair amount of the Quakers who arrived in Philadelphia, Wilmington, & South Jersey (the southern counties of NJ ) were called Irish Quakers. The Kirks in County Armagh were from Yorkshire. I've read that the name was originally Church.

Some Quakers went to Puritan areas of New England & were expelled. The religon that was more likely to cohabitate with the Quakers was the Baptist members, from what I've found. One family in my tree consisted of a Quaker (one of the Kirks) & his wife (a Buckingham ) who converted from Baptist to Quaker.

I suspect that the reason that there isn't much thought given to the Quakers in Ulster Province is that they were a minority in Ulster & when they came to Pennsylvania they were as likely as not to marry other Quakers who were not from Ulster Province.
Interesting what you have said.The part about the name previously being Church reminded me of a area in Lancashire England and a town called Accrington.

Just on the outskirts of Accrington is a 'village' called Church and the COE church there is called Church Kirk.

I think that church has now closed.
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Old 04-24-2018, 03:03 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
Interesting what you have said.The part about the name previously being Church reminded me of a area in Lancashire England and a town called Accrington.

Just on the outskirts of Accrington is a 'village' called Church and the COE church there is called Church Kirk.

I think that church has now closed.
I traced this particular Kirk family to County Armagh. There's a website that shows the family group as members of a Quaker meetinghouse. I've seen mention of the family originating in Yorkshire but don't know if it was the parents of the group in County Armagh or their ancestors.

If only it was that easy with the other Scotch-Irish families on that side, who weren't Quakers.
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Old 04-25-2018, 02:44 PM
 
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Had a quick look though Billy Kennedy's books and the 'Ks' in the index but I didn't see a Kirk. There was a Kirkpatrick and a Kirkland. Kirkpatrick was a minister at Fairview Presbyterian Church in Greenville County, South Carolina established in 1786 by three families who had emigrated from Co Antrim.

A later pastor was Alexander Kirkpatrick, from Ballymena in Co Antrim. He was a favourite with the younger members of the congregation, while the elders did not thing him sufficiently sedate. To their jibes he returned the reply - 'only a Christian has the right to be happy' .''Another Ulsterman, the Rev. Thomas D. Baird had a three year ministry at Fairview after Kirkpatrick.

Pic of the Quaker graveyard in Belfast.

The Friends Burial Ground, Balmoral,... (C) Albert Bridge :: Geograph Ireland
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Old 04-25-2018, 05:47 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
Had a quick look though Billy Kennedy's books and the 'Ks' in the index but I didn't see a Kirk. There was a Kirkpatrick and a Kirkland. Kirkpatrick was a minister at Fairview Presbyterian Church in Greenville County, South Carolina established in 1786 by three families who had emigrated from Co Antrim.

A later pastor was Alexander Kirkpatrick, from Ballymena in Co Antrim. He was a favourite with the younger members of the congregation, while the elders did not thing him sufficiently sedate. To their jibes he returned the reply - 'only a Christian has the right to be happy' .''Another Ulsterman, the Rev. Thomas D. Baird had a three year ministry at Fairview after Kirkpatrick.

Pic of the Quaker graveyard in Belfast.

The Friends Burial Ground, Balmoral,... (C) Albert Bridge :: Geograph Ireland
Thanks

I'm posting from a phone so I'm limited on data. I think that if you google Quaker, Kirk, County Armagh you'll find what I found.

Quakers & Baptists originated in northern England so it's not surprising that some Quakers found their way to Ulster Province or that the Quakers & Baptists coexisted together in the colonies. It just seems that the Quakers who found their way to Ulster Province & then made their way to the colonies were such a small number of the total that they are completely off of the radar of most people.
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Old 04-26-2018, 08:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Thanks

I'm posting from a phone so I'm limited on data. I think that if you google Quaker, Kirk, County Armagh you'll find what I found.

Quakers & Baptists originated in northern England so it's not surprising that some Quakers found their way to Ulster Province or that the Quakers & Baptists coexisted together in the colonies. It just seems that the Quakers who found their way to Ulster Province & then made their way to the colonies were such a small number of the total that they are completely off of the radar of most people.
Thanks for the info southbound. I will google as you say. I have seen some Quaker charity shops here. Was it the Quakers who buried their dead male and female in separate graves? Maybe I'm getting mixed up with some other religion.

That pic of the graveyard was beside a school I use to go to. The school is no longer there as its been demolished and replaced with houses.

In that graveyard they don't have the name of the month on the headstones it's the number of the months.

Looked for Kirk and got this...

https://magnusson-lawsingfamily.com/.../Leif-Kirk.pdf

Last edited by Ulsterman; 04-26-2018 at 08:36 AM..
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Old 04-26-2018, 12:20 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
Thanks for the info southbound. I will google as you say. I have seen some Quaker charity shops here. Was it the Quakers who buried their dead male and female in separate graves? Maybe I'm getting mixed up with some other religion.

That pic of the graveyard was beside a school I use to go to. The school is no longer there as its been demolished and replaced with houses.

In that graveyard they don't have the name of the month on the headstones it's the number of the months.

Looked for Kirk and got this...

https://magnusson-lawsingfamily.com/.../Leif-Kirk.pdf
Thanks

If you find an old enough Quaker burying ground the graves are marked only with field stones. Marking them with their names was considered vanity. You then have to consult meeting records to know who's buried there. I've been in Quaker burying grounds where you see the progression.

I don't think that the Quakers used separate areas for burying males & females, if that's what you mean. They did meet separately for the purposes of worship.

Also, as to the numbered dates, you have to know the age of the burying ground (cemetery) to figure if is calculated with the Gregorian calendar. The Quakers were known for giving dates like the first day of the fifth month which could mean May 1st, but maybe not, depending on the calendar used.

Anyway, I didn't mean to derail your thread, just to point out that there were others who got into Ulster Province besides the individuals who King James had intended. On the other hand, it's also easy enough to see how they got there. If it's something that you'd like to pursue, maybe we could get this spun off as a separate thread. Like I said, I do have ancestors who meet the traditional definition of Scotch-Irish. They're a real pain to trace. The Quakers are easy because of the meeting records.
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Old 04-26-2018, 02:32 PM
 
978 posts, read 541,524 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Thanks

If you find an old enough Quaker burying ground the graves are marked only with field stones. Marking them with their names was considered vanity. You then have to consult meeting records to know who's buried there. I've been in Quaker burying grounds where you see the progression.

I don't think that the Quakers used separate areas for burying males & females, if that's what you mean. They did meet separately for the purposes of worship.

Also, as to the numbered dates, you have to know the age of the burying ground (cemetery) to figure if is calculated with the Gregorian calendar. The Quakers were known for giving dates like the first day of the fifth month which could mean May 1st, but maybe not, depending on the calendar used.

Anyway, I didn't mean to derail your thread, just to point out that there were others who got into Ulster Province besides the individuals who King James had intended. On the other hand, it's also easy enough to see how they got there. If it's something that you'd like to pursue, maybe we could get this spun off as a separate thread. Like I said, I do have ancestors who meet the traditional definition of Scotch-Irish. They're a real pain to trace. The Quakers are easy because of the meeting records.
Yes you are correct it wasn't the Quakers it was the Moravians. I remembered the name of the village Gracehill so did a search and got this.


For Moravians, the burial ground was known as "Gods Acre" and had a strict layout. Men were buried to the left and women to the right of a central path. All the headstones were of the same shape and design - the Moravians believe that everyone is equal in death - and were laid almost flat on the ground.


Your Place And Mine - Antrim - Gracehill Churchyard
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Old 04-26-2018, 09:44 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,495 posts, read 25,698,442 times
Reputation: 8146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
Yes you are correct it wasn't the Quakers it was the Moravians. I remembered the name of the village Gracehill so did a search and got this.


For Moravians, the burial ground was known as "Gods Acre" and had a strict layout. Men were buried to the left and women to the right of a central path. All the headstones were of the same shape and design - the Moravians believe that everyone is equal in death - and were laid almost flat on the ground.


Your Place And Mine - Antrim - Gracehill Churchyard
Ah. . .the Moravians! Now I didn't realize that they, too, got to Ulster Province. In the colonies they went to Pennsylvania & some later went to North Carolina.
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