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Old 04-27-2018, 08:21 AM
 
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Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Ah. . .the Moravians! Now I didn't realize that they, too, got to Ulster Province. In the colonies they went to Pennsylvania & some later went to North Carolina.
Aye, there was a lot came from this wee place and it only the size of Yorkshire
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Old 04-29-2018, 07:21 PM
 
Location: plano
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Thanks for this thread. I am from a family of Houston's. Been told by mom the history is similar to that cited in this thread. For a birthday mom gave me a book about the Houston's, I failed to read it with comprehension at the time. I finally located it and with some help from this thread and Wikipedia find it interesting.
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Old 04-30-2018, 08:59 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
Thanks for this thread. I am from a family of Houston's. Been told by mom the history is similar to that cited in this thread. For a birthday mom gave me a book about the Houston's, I failed to read it with comprehension at the time. I finally located it and with some help from this thread and Wikipedia find it interesting.
Johnhw2..good that the thread was of some help. As you probably know Sam Houston's people came from Ulster. In the movie The First Texan there was a scene showing Sam and Andrew Jackson in conversation.

Both had an Ulster background.
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:50 AM
 
Location: plano
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I am aware. My father's mother was oldest of 8 kids who grew up on a long time family owned farm in middle Tennessee. I understand this line is a direct descadent of a line from Sam's brother.
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Old 04-30-2018, 01:31 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
I am aware. My father's mother was oldest of 8 kids who grew up on a long time family owned farm in middle Tennessee. I understand this line is a direct descadent of a line from Sam's brother.
Its great to know that they were aware of these links so many Americans are not. There were books published in the 1800s telling of the connections. Two or three I know of were by American authors. But then how many would lift a book or even be interested in their background.

Two or three years ago we had the US Consul visit the Ulster-Scots Centre and he was presented with a picture of Sam Houston after a battle.

Its good to know your roots. Who you are..where you originally came from.
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Old 04-30-2018, 02:52 PM
 
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Just some words about the Houstons

James K.Polk set out his political stall in the footsteps of illustrious Tennessee politicians like Andrew Jackson,Davy Crockett and Sam Houston. Maury County was the political stomping ground of Crockett and Houston, with Columbia the place they would have done much of their politicking.

Sam Houston- the grandson of an Ulster Presbyterian-was one of the leading personalities of the 19th century, the man who wrested Texas from Mexican control to eventually become a state of the Union.
Sam was born in Timber Ridge, Rockbridge County,Virginia on March 12, 1793 about seven miles from the town of Lexington.

The Houston family connection can be traced back to the Ballyboley/Ballynure/Brackbraken area of East County Antrim- a plantation family who had moved from Scotland in the early 17th century

In 1729, a famine year for the Scots settlers due to bad weather, there was a widow on a small farm of 25 acres in the townland of Ballybracken called Jane Houston. She had four sons aged between three and 12 and found in spite of assistance by her neighbours, that she could not pay the rent of the farm to the landlord. These were years of very low yields and subsequent high prices with the result that scarcely any farmer had surplus to sell.

The widow Houston decided she could not carry on. With whatever money she received from her animals and chattels and the landlord she set off on foot to the port of Larne, contacting an emigration agent for North America and paying passage money for herself and her four sons to New York. A Ballynure poet wrote '' Away tae the States frae the port of Larne...She sailed oot ower the sea....Like an autumn leaf on the river's drift...Torn from its native tree.

Mrs Houston married again in New York. The four sons were reared to manhood and like the majority of Ulster-Scots moved west and south as pioneers, ready to endure hardship or hostile Indians in the quest for land.

John Houston, Sam Houston's grandfather,emigrated about 1740 and with other Presbyterian kinsfolk from Co Antrim he settled in the valley of Virginia

The Houston family contains a long line of Presbyterian ministers. John Houston founded the Providence Presbyterian Church at Rockbridge in 1746 and his brother Sam often held prayer meetings in their own homes.

Sam's mother, Elizabeth Paxton Houston when her husband died moved with her nine children - six sons and three daughters- from Virginia in the covered wagons to Maryville, Blount County in Tennessee. There she joined the Bakers Creek Presbyterian Church and twice and often three times a week she and the children walked the four miles over the hills to worship. It was in this environment that Sam Houston grew up.
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Old 04-30-2018, 03:00 PM
 
Location: plano
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Thanks for posting some Houston history and relations. I know my mom has traced our Houston tree back a number of years as well as both sides of hers which are english along with my Dads father. Lewisburg in Marshall County Tn is where my Houston clan is from, I believe there is an old log cabin moved to a prominent spot in Lewisburg as it claims to be the home or a Homer Houston. This is reported to be the meeting place where Lewisburg was first formed.

The Presbyterrian church in Silva NC was reportedly built with help from my grandfather who was the minister there at the time. He later left preaching and retired to Lewisburg Tn where they worshipped at an old Presbyterian church in the country just outside town which I recall was one of the earliest Presbyterian churches in Tn. It was a small church with a cemetry beside it with no homes in sight from its wooded location.
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Old 04-30-2018, 07:40 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
Its great to know that they were aware of these links so many Americans are not. There were books published in the 1800s telling of the connections. Two or three I know of were by American authors. But then how many would lift a book or even be interested in their background.

Two or three years ago we had the US Consul visit the Ulster-Scots Centre and he was presented with a picture of Sam Houston after a battle.

Its good to know your roots. Who you are..where you originally came from.
My great grandmother was born to a Huston (their spelling). Her father was from Tennessee,Mom said possibly a brother of Sam. Her mother also came from Tennessee but the surname was Smith. Their family had origionated in Tennessee and Mom said there had been documents but when her mother married that part of the family moved to Missouri. But my great grandmother's birth name is Huston.

Interestingly, she married twice. She was about 4'10. Grandma was nearly six foot, my great aunt's familiy later settled in a different part of Los Angeles as Mom's. My great aunt was very short, along with most of that part of the family. At twelve, my grandmother did the reaching up to tall shelves. Her first marriage produced my grandmother. Her father, the tall Englishman, died soon after and she married the short Irishman who was an unrelated Smith but a Smith. Deaths in a family then were not the exception and children were just drawn into the family though there was a picture of the English Smith always on the mantle.

I wonder if the picture on the mantle is lying in someone's misc drawer. I'd love to know what he looked like. He had blond hair and blue eyes. The rest of the family is brown haired and no blue eyes.

I've heard this for a long time, but was just randomly looking at the 1930 census while killing time. A neice I thik had been questioned in the 1930 census, when family were around who'd remember.

Then I found what I had not before. It showed both marriages, step children, and the names and time match. It was wonderful to find something which exactly matches the family stories. So if looking at the census, look at everyone's census info especially if they were in different areas. It also has the names of parents and grandparents not yet seen. Especially with deaths and remarriages, people you didn't suspect may pop out of the woodwork.

What I'd love is to find the English Smith and information about where they came from, and if there are any long lost relatives out there. I don't know if the dna matching would find it but have a kit too. My guess would be from the middle of England where so many who became cheap labor came from, with mixed british and scandinavian ties. The family name IS a merger of both.

Last edited by nightbird47; 04-30-2018 at 08:09 PM..
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Old 05-01-2018, 10:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
My great grandmother was born to a Huston (their spelling). Her father was from Tennessee,Mom said possibly a brother of Sam. Her mother also came from Tennessee but the surname was Smith. Their family had origionated in Tennessee and Mom said there had been documents but when her mother married that part of the family moved to Missouri. But my great grandmother's birth name is Huston.

Interestingly, she married twice. She was about 4'10. Grandma was nearly six foot, my great aunt's familiy later settled in a different part of Los Angeles as Mom's. My great aunt was very short, along with most of that part of the family. At twelve, my grandmother did the reaching up to tall shelves. Her first marriage produced my grandmother. Her father, the tall Englishman, died soon after and she married the short Irishman who was an unrelated Smith but a Smith. Deaths in a family then were not the exception and children were just drawn into the family though there was a picture of the English Smith always on the mantle.

I wonder if the picture on the mantle is lying in someone's misc drawer. I'd love to know what he looked like. He had blond hair and blue eyes. The rest of the family is brown haired and no blue eyes.

I've heard this for a long time, but was just randomly looking at the 1930 census while killing time. A neice I thik had been questioned in the 1930 census, when family were around who'd remember.

Then I found what I had not before. It showed both marriages, step children, and the names and time match. It was wonderful to find something which exactly matches the family stories. So if looking at the census, look at everyone's census info especially if they were in different areas. It also has the names of parents and grandparents not yet seen. Especially with deaths and remarriages, people you didn't suspect may pop out of the woodwork.

What I'd love is to find the English Smith and information about where they came from, and if there are any long lost relatives out there. I don't know if the dna matching would find it but have a kit too. My guess would be from the middle of England where so many who became cheap labor came from, with mixed british and scandinavian ties. The family name IS a merger of both.
It's certainly interesting delving back into your family history but sometimes frustrating if you run up against a brick wall. I've found on my own side a link with President Woodrow Wilson whose grandfather came from Co Tyrone.

Just had a quick glance though Kennedy's The Scots-Irish in Tennessee. He is writing mostly of Rev Samuel Doak (who was at the battle of King's Mountain) but it has one reference to a Rev Smith...

'' As a student Doak fell under the influence of the Rev. Robert Smith who had emigrated from Londonderry as a young boy, and for a while he taught at Smith's school in Pequea, Pennsylvania.''
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Old 05-09-2018, 11:24 AM
 
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