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Old 09-19-2018, 10:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
"Scotch" is considered an ethnic slur. Correct term to use would be Scottish.

Aye, Scotch is a whisky and many Scots took exception to this ie being called Scotch but my own opinion is that they were always called Scotch. However, with the commercialism of whisky they did not like having the same name as a whisky. So they took on the name Scottish/Scots
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:45 AM
 
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This booklet is from the 1890's and has Scotch on it. As I said the commercialism of whisky using the same spelling probably caused the change in the spelling from Scotch to Scottish/Scots


http://www.city-data.com/forum/attac...1&d=1537465469
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Old 10-11-2018, 11:26 AM
 
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Judge Joseph Neilson (1813-1888)



"In January, 1888, that well-known American jurist and illustrious Brooklynite, Judge Joseph Neilson, died. He was an old friend of mine, of everyone who came upon his horizon. For a long while he was an invalid, but he kept this knowledge from the world, because he wanted no public demonstration. The last four years of his life he was confined to his room, where he sat all the while calm, uncomplaining, interested in all the affairs of the world, after a life of active work in it. He belonged to that breed which has developed the brain and brawn of American character - the Scotch-Irish."



Neilsonís funeral service took place at 2nd Presbyterian Church, Clinton Street, Brooklyn, in January 1888. His father was Dr Samuel Neilson and his grandfather John Neilson, who emigrated from Ulster in 1760.
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Old 10-12-2018, 12:45 PM
 
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'The Scots Irish of Early Pennsylvania', written by Judith A Ridner of Mississippi State University, and published by the Pennsylvania Historical Association.


"The Scots Irish were one of early Pennsylvania’s largest non-English immigrant groups. They were stereotyped as frontier ruffians and Indian haters. In The Scots Irish of Early Pennsylvania, historian Judith Ridner insists that this immigrant group was socio-economically diverse. Servants and free people, individuals and families, and political exiles and refugees from Ulster, they not only pioneered new frontier settlements, but also populated the state’s cities—Philadelphia and Pittsburgh—and its towns, such as Lancaster, Easton, and Carlisle.


Ridner provides a much-overdue synthesis and reassessment of this immigrant group, tracing a century of Scotch-Irish migration from 1720 to 1820. These men and women brought their version of Ulster to the colonies in their fierce commitments to family, community, entrepreneurship, Presbyterianism, republican politics, and higher education. The settlements they founded across the state, including many farms, businesses, meetinghouses, and colleges, ensured that Pennsylvania would be their cradle in America, and these settlements stand as powerful testaments to their legacy to the state’s history and development.
Temple University Press


John Davidson was the founder of the town of Belfast, Maine. His parents were from Moneymore and they emigrated following the brutal robbery and murder of their own parents. John was born in Massachusetts, 1750. In 1832, aged 82, he wrote his memoirs - which include this statement – 'they call us Scotch Irish so we are called so to this day'.

Online here: https://archive.org/stream/reminisce...00davi#page/n3


The MacGregor memorial window in First Parish Congregational Church Derry New Hampshire, installed in 1884, 165 years after the sixteen founding Scots-Irish families arrived in Nutfield, and founded Londonderry. The sixteen families came from the Aghadowey/Ballymoney/Coleraine areas and were led by Aghadowey Minister James MacGregor. The descendants of James MacGregor who commissioned the window included the MacGregor clan coat of arms and motto in (Ulster)Scots. “E’en do bait spair nocht” - there are various translations about, the most common one being 'In what you do, spare nothing'. Fascinating that after well over a century and a half in New England, they would still feel the connection strong enough to put this on the window. Kitch Scots identity was coming into fashion at that time, kilts, tartans etc, so it is understandable to an extent that they indentified with the Scots part of their ancestors identity, but ironic too, given that those same ancestors used Ulster place names everywhere they went, surely an indicator that that was where their primary affiliation lay.

Last edited by Ulsterman; 10-12-2018 at 12:54 PM..
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Old 12-11-2018, 01:33 PM
 
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Not saying I would agree with all that is written here. He mentions the Union Army and the Scotch-Irish/Ulster-Scots who fought on the Union side. Fair enough but they fought on the Confederate side too 'Stonewall' and 'JEB' to mention but two.


https://thelibrary.org/lochist/perio...v4/n4/s71i.htm
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Old 12-13-2018, 02:31 PM
 
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Another man with an Ulster background was General McCausland


Life of Brigadier General John McCausland
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Old 12-23-2018, 03:34 PM
 
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Ulster Scottish Pipe Band in America
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Old 01-04-2019, 02:49 PM
 
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New Hampshire and its settlers


https://www.nhpr.org/post/southern-n...FpSgk#stream/0
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:47 AM
 
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A song which in a few verses tells the story of the Ulster-Scots from Scotland to Ulster to America

Whisky in the White House


User Media - TinyPic - Free Image Hosting, Photo Sharing & Video Hosting
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Old 02-02-2019, 03:16 PM
 
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Eagle Wing was the first ship to set sail from Ulster to America. It left Groomsport with minister and his congregation unfortunately due to bad weather they had to turn back. However, in the 1700s thousands did make it to America.
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