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Old 02-16-2018, 03:23 PM
 
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Yes, this IS a very interesting thread. :-)


it's kind of inspiring me to explore the Scots-Irish aspects of my heritage now. I've always been more focused on our NA heritage...but I'm curious now.
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Old 02-16-2018, 03:26 PM
 
982 posts, read 542,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LilyMae521 View Post
I also would like to thank Ulsterman for all his informative and interesting posts on this thread. I just finished "Born Fighting" by James Webb, which I had heard of but forgotten about until I was reminded by an Ulsterman post. (iirc) It is a fascinating book and easy to read.


I'm actually a yank with very old and very WASP-y roots so it was wonderful to learn more about where a lot of the real grit came from when this country was being settled.


Thanks again to Ulsterman.
Thank you LilyMae, it is good to see that folk are realising the part played by these people. I have read James Webb's book and also thought he had a good grasp of the history of the people. Indeed I was a wee bit surprised that an American knew their background.

I reckon Born Fighting along with God's Frontiersmen and Ulster Sails West. There are a few others including The People With No Name the title says a lot because that's the way it was.

WASP seems not to be as prominent as it once was. The book The Killer Angels talks of a people who had the same faith and spoke the same language.
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Old 02-16-2018, 09:51 PM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
Your welcome HIW, Its good that some you and others have an interest. HIW, there was never a movie made of it. It was a series on Ulster Television and I was lucky enough to have the foresight to copy it onto video as each episode came on. That 40 minute one is made from various parts I posted on YT. Other parts of the video relate to happenings in Ulster..the 1798 rebellion, the formation of Carson's Army etc

I have it on DVD but the USA is a different format. I think most of the American parts are the ones I posted on YT.

The book has also chapters about the Ulster-Scots in Australia and New Zealand.

I'll see what I can do re posting it.
Thanks, that ^ would be great!

Well, I thinks it's far more important and fair to say that you had the initial (and continued) interest and enthusiasm to share your passion with the rest of us. We are fortunate to have an opportunity to have a glimpse of a people very few of us were/are familiar with who have contributed so very much in the making of this country up to its present time.

Point being, I think many of us are familiar with the 'history' of the making of America but not necessarily the huge contribution of the Ulster Scots...and their presence in America from the beginning, before America was the United States of America.

Your interest and your passion to this end is...contagious!

Last edited by HomeIsWhere...; 02-16-2018 at 10:05 PM..
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Old 02-17-2018, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Boston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
You can make it a topic if you so wish.
Scotch is a drink.
Not a nationality.
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Old 02-17-2018, 10:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonesg View Post
Scotch is a drink.
Not a nationality.
But I believe that was not always the case. The post I made earlier on this thread bears this out. That book was published in the 1800s and the title on it included Scotch. I think as time went on and whisky become a commercial product and was named Scotch the people then became known as Scots or Scottish to separate them from the whisky.
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Old 02-17-2018, 11:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sassybluesy View Post
Yes, this IS a very interesting thread. :-)


it's kind of inspiring me to explore the Scots-Irish aspects of my heritage now. I've always been more focused on our NA heritage...but I'm curious now.
Yes Sassy, they did contribute a lot to the making of America.
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Old 02-17-2018, 02:48 PM
 
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One woman knows her roots Couple of pics from Arizona



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Old 02-17-2018, 06:48 PM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
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Default A Rose by any other name...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jonesg View Post
Scotch is a drink. Not a nationality.
This is such an old debate on these boards...as far back as 2014

However, you're right, Scotch is a malt or grain Whisky/Whiskey (hmm, kind of similar in debate as Scots/Scotch-Irish).

And as you read below there are some minor controversies over the usage between Scotch-Irish and Scots-Irish but we all should know by now what the reference of either term is about, in the end as in the beginning, it is about the Ulster Scots and their progeny throughout North America and no doubt, other continents as well.

However, over 400 hundred years ago Elizabeth 1 of England coined the usage of Scotch-Irish (in reference to Ulster)...in a letter dated April 14, 1573 wrote and I quote:

Scotch-Irish Americans

"We are given to understand that a nobleman named 'Sorley Boy'[MacDonnel] and others, who be of the Scotch-Irish race..."

This term continued in usage for over a century before the earliest known American reference appeared in a Maryland affidavit in 1689/90.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch-Irish_Americans

Scotch-Irish or Scots-Irish: What's in a Name?

"Scots-Irish is the correct term," my accoster insisted. "Remember, Scotch is the drink, Scots are the people." In Tennessee having grown up with and being acquainted with only Scotch-Irish, I was puzzled. Scotch-Irish had no negative connotations anywhere in the United States I knew of and was a respectable term that never suggested an alcoholic beverage or gave offense

Scotch-Irish or Scots-Irish: What's in a Name?
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Old 02-18-2018, 01:17 PM
 
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At least eight of the 56 signatories of the American Declaration of Independence were of the Scots-Irish tradition. The Declaration, signed in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776, was a statement which enshrined much of the independent democratic spirit that had been brought to America by the Presbyterian settlers from Ulster.

Thomas Jefferson from Virginia drafted the Declaration and the task of transcribing the document went to Charles Thomson, a native of Maghera in Co Londonderry and he designed the original Great Seal of America
Of the eight Scots-Irish signators, John Hancock from Massachusetts is undoubtly the best known. On completing his signature, Hancock of Banbridge, Co Down extraction, said: ''There, I guess King George will be able to read that ''. The other seven known Scots-Irishmen who signed the famous document were :

William Whipple - his parents had arrived in Maine from Ireland in 1730
Robert Paine - his grandfather came from Dungannon, Co Tyrone
Thomas McKean - his father came from Ballymoney, Co Antrim
Thomas Nelson - his grandfather came from Strabane, Co Tyrone
Matthew Thornton - from Londonderry, he settled in New Hampshire in 1718
George Taylor - the son of an Ulster Presbyterian minister
Edward Rutledge - another son of an Ulster Presbyterian family.

After being transcribed, debated and signed by the Continental Congress, the Declaration was then passed to another native-born Ulsterman for printing. John Dunlap had moved from a printing company in Strabane, Co Tyrone to work in America in the mid-18th century and it fell on him the honour of printing the first copies of the Declaration. Later in 1784, Dunlap had the distinction of printing America's first daily newspaper, The Pennsylvania Packet. Soon after it was signed the Declaration was widely distributed thoughout America, with the first public reading being enacted by Colonel John Nixon, whose father was Ulster born.

The first newspaper to publish the full text of the Declaration outside America was the Belfast News Letter. Details of the Declaration had arrived by ship from America in the port of Londonderry about six weeks after it was signed and it was taken 100 miles to the offices of the Belfast News Letter. The news caused much stir in Belfast and for the News Letter, which carries the distinction today of being the oldnest newspaper in the English-speaking world, founded in 1737, it was a European scoop. King George III in London had not even been acquainted of the news.
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Old 02-19-2018, 10:32 AM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
4,099 posts, read 3,390,521 times
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Apologies in advance if this has been previously posted as I had not seen this and I found it very interesting. It begins with a "comic strip' introduction so you might have to stick it out for a couple of minutes.

Ulster sails west


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSsfyzTAtu4

ETA...

Forged In Ulster

Published on Jan 20, 2018

A patriotic take on the Ulster-Scot emigration to North America and how these 'stubborn people' shaped the USA and it's politics. It particularly focuses on the ancestral homes of America's Scots-Irish Presidents. A vintage 1974 (27 mins) documentary.

Presented by Charles Witherspoon.
Musical ballad arrangements by Billy White.
Illustrations by Rowel Friers.

Last edited by HomeIsWhere...; 02-19-2018 at 10:48 AM.. Reason: Addition
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