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Old 01-24-2018, 01:35 PM
 
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIzJ...ature=youtu.be
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Old 01-24-2018, 02:27 PM
 
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Thank you Ulsterman. I am one of you

this was an interesting clip and I hope to visit the places of my ancestors and go to that genealogical center someday.

My people came in 1732 or so depending upon which line from Counties Donegal and Tyrone and settled in South Carolina .

Crosh House -Newtown Stewart
Corgau
Derry
near Convoy
Ballyloughan
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Old 01-24-2018, 02:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theoldnorthstate View Post
Thank you Ulsterman. I am one of you

this was an interesting clip and I hope to visit the places of my ancestors and go to that genealogical center someday.

My people came in 1732 or so depending upon which line from Counties Donegal and Tyrone and settled in South Carolina .

Crosh House -Newtown Stewart
Corgau
Derry
near Convoy
Ballyloughan

I'm sure you will get a warm welcome. You have mentioned a few areas which I don't know so you are away ahead of me.
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Old 01-24-2018, 03:03 PM
 
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Is there a topic here?

Posting a youtube video is not a topic, it's "support" for a topic.
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Old 01-25-2018, 11:15 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
Is there a topic here?

Posting a youtube video is not a topic, it's "support" for a topic.
You can make it a topic if you so wish.
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Old 01-25-2018, 12:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
You can make it a topic if you so wish.
Well it's difficult when you don't know what the topic is beyond "Scotch-Irish" but I will do my best:

I thought I was Scottish on my fathers side until we traced his history back farther and found his relatives originally immigrated from Ireland to Scotland, then to America. So I am part "Scotch-Irish" but even that is a misnomer. It's not Scottish at all but Irish.
So it's really incorrect to use the term "Scotch-Irish". I understand the term was used to identify one group of immigrants from arriving during one period of US history, from other groups of immigrants from Ireland. Kind of like an exclusive label.
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Old 01-25-2018, 12:46 PM
 
1,491 posts, read 673,302 times
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Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
Well it's difficult when you don't know what the topic is beyond "Scotch-Irish" but I will do my best:

I thought I was Scottish on my fathers side until we traced his history back farther and found his relatives originally immigrated from Ireland to Scotland, then to America. So I am part "Scotch-Irish" but even that is a misnomer. It's not Scottish at all but Irish.
So it's really incorrect to use the term "Scotch-Irish". I understand the term was used to identify one group of immigrants from arriving during one period of US history, from other groups of immigrants from Ireland. Kind of like an exclusive label.

Aye, that's about right. The Ulster-Scots/Scotch-Irish came to America in the 1700s. The Irish came mostly after the famine in the 1800s. Having said that there were more Scots (in Ireland) who came to America in the 1800s

Going away back to ancient times original inhabitants of Ireland (Scotti) moved to Caledonia and give it the name Scotland. Don't know if this would have been when your father's side immigrated to Scotland. At its nearest point Ulster and Scotland are only 13 miles apart and there has always been going and coming between the two countries.
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Old 01-25-2018, 02:14 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Scots-Irish is a confusing term for many Americans.

Many people have been told that their family is descended from Scots-Irish and assume that means an Irish Celtic cultural background rather than the Anglo-Saxon culture of the Scottish lowlands.

They were also supporters of King William of Orange which, according to some scholars, is the etymological origin of the term hillbilly.
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Old 01-25-2018, 03:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Scots-Irish is a confusing term for many Americans.

Many people have been told that their family is descended from Scots-Irish and assume that means an Irish Celtic cultural background rather than the Anglo-Saxon culture of the Scottish lowlands.

They were also supporters of King William of Orange which, according to some scholars, is the etymological origin of the term hillbilly.
Your spot on re the different backgrounds. Yes, I have read that too about the term hillbilly. James Webb in his Born Fighting mentions how his grandparents had the stories handed down from them of King Billy and the Siege. Some lines from Ulster Sails West.



Morever, it is interesting to note that they did not regard themselves as Irish. In fact, nothing infuriated them more than to be classed as Irish.

''It made my blood boil,'' said William Smith, ''to hear ourselves called a parcel of Irish.''

They protested violently when American people and American officials described them in this way. They were, they said with great indignation, people of the Scottish nation in Ulster who had given their strength and substance and lives to uphold the British connection there, and it was hard, in this new land, to be identified with the very people to whom they had always been opposed.

It need hardly be said that these emigrants of 1718 were a tough people. They were settled on the Indian border, and were an efficient protection to the province,which was what they were intended to be, and was , indeed, the reason why they were at first welcomed by the earlier colonists. They were a terror to the Indians, and they soon gained a reputation for fighting and pugnacity that often left them in bad odour with the Quakers and the State Authorities.

It is recorded of the New Londonderry men that their arrival and settlement on the frontier were resented by some colonists nearby, who organised an expedition to drive out the newcomers by force. When these people arrived at the edge of the clearing, they found the Ulster emigrants assembled for worship, their minister in the midst. One good look was sufficient. There was no attack. Very quietly they made for home and I have no doubt it was the best of their play.

For it was not for nothing that the new township was called Londonderry. Many of the settlers were veterans of the famous siege, and that siege was one of their proudest memories. It is recorded that the song most frequently sung round their firesides was the ballad of the Boyne Water. Oldish men who had starved and fought on 'Derry's walls, and youngish men reared in that tradition were not men to be trifled with.

Their minister was the Rev. James McGregore, a Londonderry veteran himself. It was his boast that he had fired the great gun which announced the coming of the relief ships. On his death, he was succeeded by the Rev. Matthew Clark, of Boveedy, another Londonderry soldier, who bore the scar of a siege wound on his temple all his life after.

It was recently said of James McGregore that there was no minister of that name in Londonderry during the siege. But, like his successor in New Londonderry, he was a soldier before he became minister. They can still show you in New Londonderry the musket that he took with him into his pulpit, while the worshipers took theirs into the pews.

They can still tell you that when Matthew Clark lay dying in New Hampshire he directed that none should touch his coffin or carry it to the grave except the men who had fought beside him on 'Derry's walls.
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Old 01-25-2018, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Scots-Irish is a confusing term for many Americans.

Many people have been told that their family is descended from Scots-Irish and assume that means an Irish Celtic cultural background rather than the Anglo-Saxon culture of the Scottish lowlands.
I've only met one person who confused the two, and that was on this forum (she just kept insisting the Irish didn't come to America until the 19th century and couldn't get her head around the fact that Scots-Irish wasn't the same as Irish). In real life, I've never met anyone who didn't know what Scots-Irish was.
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