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Old 06-21-2018, 06:58 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,586 posts, read 3,674,133 times
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@ Coney^^
You might be right -- but that was not the case when I was in school and by the time my daughter got there the baseball coach was teaching History and reading the text a week or two ahead of the class. I think the school had one actual History teacher.
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Old 06-24-2018, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,646 posts, read 3,060,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Only an incredibly poor teacher, devoid of knowledge and imagination, would be incapable of teaching World History from the rise of Sumer 7,000 years ago to the near-Present.
I bet Tom Lehrer could do it in about five minutes, to the tune of "Battle Hymn the Republic."
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Old 06-24-2018, 03:03 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,902 posts, read 42,154,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Only an incredibly poor teacher, devoid of knowledge and imagination, would be incapable of teaching World History from the rise of Sumer 7,000 years ago to the near-Present......
The problem with AP World History (or any World History course for that matter) is the overwhelming amount of material to be covered.

Many, if not most, school systems somewhat solved the problem for the non-AP course by splitting it up, Early World some time in Middle School (which I happen to disagree with) and Modern World some time during 9th-11th Grades. As a note, the Modern course starts at.......................1450 or thereabouts.

AP World has become unwieldy over the last decade or so. The College Board changed the recommended (meaning required) syllabus several years ago and added both time periods and areas to it. The amount of time spent covering Europe after that recentering was to be no more than 20%.

Teachers are faced with basically doing a chapter plus a week from a 40 chapter book during a 30 week school year time frame (AP tests are given the first two weeks of May). Add to that what many schools systems, like my former one, have done by mandating every fifth class Benchmark tests and getting rid of every day classes and going to an every other day block schedule and you had classes not getting through the mandated material.

To address something else: no high school course, even AP, is designed to be an in depth course. All of them across the disciplines are meant to be, and always have been, survey courses.

Oh, for my bona fides. I was both an AP teacher (Psychology and World History) as well as my school's AP Coordinator (a College Board mandated position equivalent to a Department Chair).

Sample school syllabus for AP World detailing Scope and Sequence:

https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/p...ap-art-history
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Old 06-25-2018, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
17,886 posts, read 54,207,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
The problem with AP World History (or any World History course for that matter) is the overwhelming amount of material to be covered.

Many, if not most, school systems somewhat solved the problem for the non-AP course by splitting it up, Early World some time in Middle School (which I happen to disagree with) and Modern World some time during 9th-11th Grades. As a note, the Modern course starts at.......................1450 or thereabouts.

AP World has become unwieldy over the last decade or so. The College Board changed the recommended (meaning required) syllabus several years ago and added both time periods and areas to it. The amount of time spent covering Europe after that recentering was to be no more than 20%.

Teachers are faced with basically doing a chapter plus a week from a 40 chapter book during a 30 week school year time frame (AP tests are given the first two weeks of May). Add to that what many schools systems, like my former one, have done by mandating every fifth class Benchmark tests and getting rid of every day classes and going to an every other day block schedule and you had classes not getting through the mandated material.

To address something else: no high school course, even AP, is designed to be an in depth course. All of them across the disciplines are meant to be, and always have been, survey courses.

Oh, for my bona fides. I was both an AP teacher (Psychology and World History) as well as my school's AP Coordinator (a College Board mandated position equivalent to a Department Chair).

Sample school syllabus for AP World detailing Scope and Sequence:

https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/p...ap-art-history
Impressive and interesting PDF. The changes since the days of my high school history are notable, and certainly more global.

I find the thematic change to a trade orientation rather than personality cult and date memorization a large step forward, but perhaps short on anthropology and recognition of day-to-day life differences in the various cultures and time periods, as well as motivations for groups development within subcultures (which often are the core drivers of trade).

I also note that while the course design creates an atmosphere of global citizenry, it of necessity does so at the expense of local identity. Vermont history was a course when I went to school in Vermont, and it was useful in helping me understand my more immediate environment and the dynamics that had historical origins.

As for quick reviews of "Mien Kampf", Marx's work, and Osama bin Laden’s “Declaration of Jihad against
the United States", I wonder if a false sense of knowledge gets instilled from a partial coverage of summary notes?

With motivated intelligent students, that could be a fun course for everyone.
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Old 07-14-2018, 12:00 PM
 
4,544 posts, read 895,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Only an incredibly poor teacher, devoid of knowledge and imagination, would be incapable of teaching World History from the rise of Sumer 7,000 years ago to the near-Present.

It's like the moronic imbecile who spent 6 freaking weeks "teaching" the US Civil War in US History. Making students memorize battles and casualty figures, only to regurgitate that on quizzes and tests is neither teaching nor learning.

If someone can't teach the US Civil War in 3-4 days, they should be fired, and black-listed from ever teaching anywhere in the US.

History is conceptual in nature, and best taught as concepts, which goes a lot farther in developing and expanding minds than memorizing useless dates and figures.



The term "Dark Ages" is perfectly suitable for the period starting with the fall of the Western Roman Empire to the Enlightenment.

Serfdom -- a nice way of saying slavery -- was a step backward, not forward. Feudalism was a step backward, not forward. Politically, socially, economically and culturally, everything went backward, not forward.
I thought "Dark Ages" was used to describe the time one lives with their mother-in-law.
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Old 07-15-2018, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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What happened in 1492? Christians finally ejected the Moors from Spain that year. It had an immense effect on subsequent history, as Spain exported that brutality to the New World.
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Old 07-15-2018, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,275 posts, read 12,516,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
The term "Dark Ages" is perfectly suitable for the period starting with the fall of the Western Roman Empire to the Enlightenment.

Serfdom -- a nice way of saying slavery -- was a step backward, not forward. Feudalism was a step backward, not forward. Politically, socially, economically and culturally, everything went backward, not forward.
I would put the European Dark Ages in a smaller time frame, from the invasion of the Roman power vacuum by barbarians until the rise of feudalism. The rampaging armies and robber bands made it impossible for a civil society to exist. Feudal lords with an armed cohort that could defend their fief was a big step up. The lords built ovens, baths and grain mills as a monopoly, but at least they remained standing to benefit the population.
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Old 07-15-2018, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Ohio
19,929 posts, read 14,245,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
I would put the European Dark Ages in a smaller time frame, from the invasion of the Roman power vacuum by barbarians until the rise of feudalism. The rampaging armies and robber bands made it impossible for a civil society to exist. Feudal lords with an armed cohort that could defend their fief was a big step up. The lords built ovens, baths and grain mills as a monopoly, but at least they remained standing to benefit the population.

Roman slaves had more rights than the 90% of the people in post-Roman Europe.



The Dark Ages lasts until those rights are restored.
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Old 07-15-2018, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,275 posts, read 12,516,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Roman slaves had more rights than the 90% of the people in post-Roman Europe.

The Dark Ages lasts until those rights are restored.
That's an odd criterion for a dark age. I would define it as a period where a stable civilization was not possible. By your definition, the Dark Ages did not end until the 19th century.
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Old 07-15-2018, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
41,029 posts, read 18,583,829 times
Reputation: 18680
It seems like an oxymoron to speak of the future of history, but the longer humanity is around, the smaller the past must become. If you are are scholar or have a deep interest, you might wind up reading Ceasar's Commentaries, but the vast majority's awareness of the conquest of Gaul comes from reading a short summary of the events and outcomes in a book devoted to a broader history of Rome, written by a modern historian. There are so many facts and details out there about the past that a simple mastery of the general story has to suffice.

Not only is history a perpetually refilling reservoir, but much more detailed accounts from numerous sources document our more recent ages, so the detail and facts database grows geometrically. Consequently we might ask not only what will the people of the year 2500 know about us, but what will they know of Rome? They will have had another 500 years of history added to the pile....something must be overlooked or understood only in a very digested manner.

Finally, the further we move from the past, the less relevancy it has for modern times. It would be impossible to figure out the particular impact that Caesar's assassination had on anyone living, but the same could not be said for the Russian Revolution. Anyone living who went through the Cold War felt the impact of that event.

So it should not be surprising that we have arrived at a time where the plate has become too full and something must be dumped. The plate will continue to get fuller and fuller, perhaps by the year 3500, history books will cover the entire period from the stone age through the space age with "There was a period of adjustment and growth for several thousand years..."
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