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Old 03-29-2008, 07:18 PM
 
Location: So. of Rosarito, Baja, Mexico
6,654 posts, read 18,696,368 times
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I was too young to comprehend what HITLER said in 1932 but do remember hearing the Excellent one made by WINNIE "WINSTON CHURCHILL" at the beginning of WW11. Stefhen
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Old 03-30-2008, 06:29 AM
 
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Default Oldest Historical Speech you ever listened too!!!

Steve, Growing up in the 1930/40s, many historical events are a kaleidoscope in my mind, but I remember my family listening to President Roosevelt's "Fireside Chats" on our old Atwater-Kent radio. Of course, the country was in the throes of depression, and Roosevelt's words were received with great anticipation. I don't think people thought so much in terms of political parties in those dark days, as they were in looking for any sign of hope and relief from the specter of economic hardship. Roosevelt's words were measured and reassuring, quite different from the demagoguery of fear that we, unfortunately, hear today. Certainly, no silly talk of who can best answer three a.m phone calls!

Thanks for a good subject and a chance to reminisce.
John
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Old 03-30-2008, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Upstate NY
110 posts, read 267,051 times
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My grandfather regarding FDR: "God-dam Sonofabitch... Communist"!, in broken English (Italian accent). LMAO. Lou

Last edited by Loujr; 03-30-2008 at 08:57 AM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 03-30-2008, 09:03 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,674,652 times
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Lyndon Johnson saying "I shall not seek, nor will I accept, the nomination of my party for president in 1968". I believe I am paraphrasing a bit.

I aslo remember the assassination of President Kennedy.
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Old 03-30-2008, 10:02 AM
 
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The earliest I remember is Eisenhower..but I was pretty young (Still am!!)
so I don't remember what he said.. just my Grandma telling me to be quiet because "The President" was speaking!!
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Old 03-30-2008, 10:48 AM
 
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Loujr,

I hope I don't take Steve's subject too far afield, but your grandfather's reaction toward FDR wasn't unusual. Few presidents, with the possible exception of Lincoln, have elicited more intense emotion than FDR. There was little middle ground; he was either loved or reviled, often depending on the person's employment situation. A friend once told me that FDR's name was only invoked around their dinner table with the words: "That SOB in the WH!" Of course, as he said, his father had a steady job in an upscale men's suit factory in Rochester, NY, throughout the depression.

FDR certainly didn't end the depression, but, I believe it was political scientist Richard Hofstadter -- often a critic of FDR -- who said the novel and sometimes risky policies of FDR may have saved capitalism in America. FDR had a lot of faults, but at least he did something to break through the seeming paralysis that had gripped the country.

To get back on topic, I remember the voice of Lowell Thomas was a nightly staple in our home. I believe his sign off was, "So long until tomorrow!" Orson Wells panicked some people with his 1938 "War of the Worlds" broadcast. Charles Collingwood, Edward R. Murrow and other's broadcasts from heavily bombed London must have been among the first of their kind. It made the world seem like a smaller and sometimes scary place.
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Old 03-30-2008, 11:51 AM
 
Location: So. of Rosarito, Baja, Mexico
6,654 posts, read 18,696,368 times
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At the time many people were either "pro or con" depending what end of the food line they were at. FDR did have his CRITICS. It is a sad state of affairs to admit that a WAR has to be made in order to bring a country any prosperity and out of dillusionment. Stefhen
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Old 03-31-2008, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY
110 posts, read 267,051 times
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John Walmsley,
I don't mean to get too far off topic but one of my favorite pass-times when I was home from college on vacation was visiting my grandparents and baiting my grandfather abt. FDR. I was very interested in that period of American History and he was in business with a young family during that time and was literate in both Italian and English (something unusual for that era). We'd sit, drink his homemade wine, eat, discusss politics and I'd tell him about the latest books I'd read about how great FDR was; all the time watching him for a reaction. His face would turn stone cold and he'd begin to mutter in English and Italian when he couldn't take any more. My aunts would hover over him and admonish me for upsetting, "Pa". Of course it was all done in fun and he knew it, but I loved seeing his reactions. Lou
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Old 04-02-2008, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Cosmic Consciousness
3,871 posts, read 15,520,440 times
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This is a fun topic and I'd like to keep it going!
I was very little, but I remember some of the radio fuss over Dewey NOT defeating Truman.

Parenthetically, in the ferociously Republican household in which I grew up, Truman was reviled -- and I remember the semi-reverence in which Eisenhower was spoken about. Isn't it interesting to grow up and find out that politicians are almost all vile? Except Bill Bradley, but then I'm a sucker for integrity. :-)
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Old 04-02-2008, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Tucson AZ & Leipzig, Germany
2,387 posts, read 7,771,254 times
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I was not born until 20 years after his death, but I love listening to old recordings of Will Rogers. Once I visited the Will Rogers museum just north east of Tulsa, and heard a number of his talks that were originally given during the golden age of radio in the 1920s and 30s. They have recordings of countless thousands of hours of his radio programs and performances, a treasure trove of independent thinking and common sense. Perhaps a good antidote to the nonsense or hot air spoken by most politicians throughout the ages.
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