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Old 10-08-2018, 01:07 AM
 
18,467 posts, read 11,865,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
I'm not clear when NYC reached the same level but it's clear when the city surpassed London. 1945. The center of the global economy shifted to Manhattan. The UK was flat broke. The city was so heavily damaged by the war that all the bombed out buildings were not completely cleared until the 60's. In the US the economy exploded. New jobs. Veterans going to college and university on a government stipend. In London there was rationing into the 1950's.


United States became the world's major superpower after WWII virtually by default; we were the "last man standing" if you will economy wise.


Previous holder (Great Britain) was devastated both physically and economically by WWII. Great Britain didn't fully repay war debts to USA until 2006! BBC NEWS | UK | UK settles WWII debts to allies


GB actually was bankrupt by 1940, meaning USA virtually paid for WWII: https://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?t=27548


Thus it was only natural that New York came to dominate world financial markets in post war era.


Being as all this may you also have things like this:


https://www.investopedia.com/article...an-finance.asp


https://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/04/m...ll-street.html


https://www.businessinsider.com/sorr...l-city-2014-10
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Old 10-08-2018, 07:06 AM
 
Location: London
3,892 posts, read 3,351,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
I'm not clear when NYC reached the same level but it's clear when the city surpassed London. 1945. The center of the global economy shifted to Manhattan. The UK was flat broke. The city was so heavily damaged by the war that all the bombed out buildings were not completely cleared until the 60's. In the US the economy exploded. New jobs. Veterans going to college and university on a government stipend. In London there was rationing into the 1950's.
London still has two WW2 bomb site which not was built on - They are used as surface car parking by speculators.

Liverpool has many WW2 air raid bomb sites. Banksy painted a plane on one:

Spoiler


So they cut it out of the wall:
https://inews.co.uk/light-relief/off...rpool-workmen/
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Old 10-08-2018, 01:07 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA
3,905 posts, read 2,941,105 times
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Things were difficult for the Brits for a long time but overseas there was a little bit of the vanishing empire left but not for long. I lived in Singapore in the 60's and there were thousands of UK troops stationed there right up to about 1971.


They absolutely loved Singapore. It was a struggling third world country and the British pound went a long way. They had maids to do all the chores and housing that was far superior to back home. And the weather was better. Some of the old British colonial mansion style homes are still there many in the Changi area where the old RN base was located.
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Old 10-13-2018, 12:17 PM
 
Location: London
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Being as all this may you also have things like this:

https://www.investopedia.com/article...an-finance.asp
They point to the Erie canal and the Black Ball line as the turning point in New York's fortunes away from Philadelphia. The Black Ball line was a Liverpool line. It gave connections with Liverpool a massive trading centre at the time.
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Old 10-16-2018, 11:43 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
6,836 posts, read 9,433,542 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
When did New York City begin to compete with London on the world stage as an equal? London being the much older and more established city has had a huge leg up on New York for a long time, but I think most would agree that today they are relative equals, with a nod going to New York City in a lot of areas.


When did New York City's economy begin to compete at a similar level with London's?


When did New York City's fame begin to match London's on a global scale?
I think it is hard to pinpoint an exact year but if you had to pick one, I would say 1898. That is the year the boroughs consolidated into the City of Greater New York. Chiefly the City of New York (which included Manhattan and the Bronx) joined with the City of Brooklyn and the independent towns of Queens and Staten Island.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_of_Greater_New_York

In reality though, it was a gradual process over the 19th century. New York was booming at the time and even though she was initially far behind most European cities, she was able to catch up rapidly. For instance, the New York Philharmonic Orchestra was founded in 1842 - the same year as the famous Vienna Orchestra. In the same way, the Metropolitan Museums of Art was founded in New York in 1870, early enough to be able to obtain what is today one of the greatest museum collection's of art.
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Old 10-26-2018, 06:24 PM
 
Location: London U.K.
1,295 posts, read 527,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumann Koch View Post
PBS just ran a five-part series: Victorian Slum House.

In the series a group of 15 modern-day volunteers, aged between 10 and 59, are transported back to Victorian London as they spend three weeks living and working in a recreation of the notorious Old Nichol slum in Bethnal Green in London's East End.

A combined reality and historical drama, it really helps you understand the rise of the inner city of London (it does also discuss New York), and the ongoing plight of the poor.

Try and catch it!
I wasn’t aware of the PBS series, although I watch PBS America often over here in old London Town, but Old Nichol Street still exists, it runs from Shoreditch High Street to Swanfield Street, in Bethnal Green.
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Old 10-30-2018, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Ohio
18,160 posts, read 13,345,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
When did New York City begin to compete with London on the world stage as an equal? London being the much older and more established city has had a huge leg up on New York for a long time, but I think most would agree that today they are relative equals, with a nod going to New York City in a lot of areas.

When did New York City's economy begin to compete at a similar level with London's?

When did New York City's fame begin to match London's on a global scale?
About the 1790s.

New York City was the Capital. Congress met at Federal Hall in New York City. In fact, one evening just before they left for dinner at 6:00 PM, they voted to explore options to the Articles of Confederation.

If you know anything about the District of Columbia, then you know it was a mosquito-infested malaria-ridden swamp.

Not really a great place for banks.

New York City was much better for banks, and it was a major port city, which is why many immigrants came to New York City, not to mention it was closer than ports in Philadelphia, Norfolk or Charleston, and yes, it cost more to sail there than to New York City.

New York City became a major banking and financial center, which is what led to its competition with London, also a major banking and financial center located on a port.
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Old 10-31-2018, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,266 posts, read 8,430,874 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
About the 1790s.

New York City was the Capital. Congress met at Federal Hall in New York City. In fact, one evening just before they left for dinner at 6:00 PM, they voted to explore options to the Articles of Confederation.

If you know anything about the District of Columbia, then you know it was a mosquito-infested malaria-ridden swamp.

Not really a great place for banks.

New York City was much better for banks, and it was a major port city, which is why many immigrants came to New York City, not to mention it was closer than ports in Philadelphia, Norfolk or Charleston, and yes, it cost more to sail there than to New York City.

New York City became a major banking and financial center, which is what led to its competition with London, also a major banking and financial center located on a port.

The 1790's is when New York passed up London? I believe that's the earliest anyone has suggested.
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Old 11-01-2018, 11:29 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
The 1790's is when New York passed up London? I believe that's the earliest anyone has suggested.
You are right, 1790 is far too early.

At the time, the developed part of New York City was at the southern tip of Manhattan, all south of Canal Street. The great bulk of Manhattan was still farmland or forest, except for a dew outlying villages like Harlem.

The outer boroughs were even less developed, places like Brooklyn, Flushing, Jamaica, Flatbush, Fordham, Westchester, Bushwick etc., were basically small villages and towns.

To look at just one category, today New York is famous for having one of the greatest English speaking theater districts in the World, Broadway. But in 1790, New York had exactly one small theater - the John Street Theatre.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Street_Theatre

So I would say theater in New York, and the city as a whole, gradually developed and began to compete with London throughout the 1800s but 1790 is too early.
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Old 11-02-2018, 07:06 AM
 
3,811 posts, read 1,705,509 times
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Did something happen to London?
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