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Old Today, 01:31 PM
 
308 posts, read 151,302 times
Reputation: 290

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
Seriously?? Do you know nothing about American history?
Yes. I spent much of my college years studying it.
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Old Today, 01:35 PM
 
Location: San Jose
1,560 posts, read 462,197 times
Reputation: 1605
Quote:
Originally Posted by waffleiron1968 View Post
The CW was a complex affair rooted ultimately in the slavery issue. However the early US and the citizenry d8d share (to a greater degree than today) cultural commonality and a shared experience. To deny that is rather silly.
No they didn't. Early America was a fragmented nation of various ethnic and linguistic groups that generally did not trust or intermix with each other. This doesn't even take into account the North vs South cultural divide that existed. Circa 1830 A German speaking farmer in Pennsylvania, an Irish dockworker in Boston and a Southern Plantation owner in Georgia would have had very little commonality.
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Old Today, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
37,258 posts, read 17,553,612 times
Reputation: 16975
This thread appears to have escaped from the politics board where it belongs. The obvious topic, although the OP is doing his or her best to not come out and say it, is "How American are more recent immigrants?", a question that would only occur to someone who considered his or her self to be one of those "truer" Americans, and the more recent to be suspect.

You have your answer from several posters....anyone born here or naturalized as a citizen, is as American as anyone else. It is in the Constitution which makes no distinctions regarding how long anyone or their ancestors have been in the country. Your response was ..
Quote:
A nice statement but do you REALLY believe it?
...as though anyone who respected recent immigrants was probably lying because, you know, deep down inside we are all closet bigots.

I believe that we have provided you with your answers, that you do not like them is no cause for repeating the question.
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Old Today, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
6,356 posts, read 3,538,551 times
Reputation: 15161
Quote:
Originally Posted by waffleiron1968 View Post
A people united neither by heritage or shared experience have very weak bonds. No?
We're united by the Constitution. And that is a very strong bond.
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Old Today, 01:46 PM
 
2,817 posts, read 1,245,075 times
Reputation: 2170
Quote:
Originally Posted by waffleiron1968 View Post
The space doesn't allow for the full title I wanted. But essentially do you (your forefathers) have had to have played a role in the nations key formative events. I placed 1865 as the cut off as the CW is the definitive event in US history. I mean to truly be from the US does the likes of Lexington and Concord have to mean something to you?

Essentially, unless you have connections to such epic events are you not less American than those who shaped the nation. It follows that 'real Americans' (not hyphened) are inevitably rooted in Western Europe and the AA population.

Just a thought exercise. The US is becoming too far detatched from what made it 'America'.
Buenos will love your support in this thread.

Fort Bend going Democrat?
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Old Today, 01:50 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA
3,916 posts, read 2,944,447 times
Reputation: 6215
Looks like the White Nationalists have spilled over from the P&C forum.
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Old Today, 01:54 PM
 
11,603 posts, read 17,594,260 times
Reputation: 17351
Quote:
Originally Posted by waffleiron1968 View Post
Yes. I spent much of my college years studying it.
I think the title is confusing everyone. It's also not a historical topic as there is no defined date cut-off to when an immigrant considers himself or herself an American....particularly since the bulk of American immigration happened after 1865. The question really is one of full assimilation into the culture. Sometimes that happens immediately, many times it takes one generation as the children are the ones that are educated in US schools and grow up with US culture.

U.S. has always been good at assimilating immigrants so that their patriotic roots almost instantly are aligned with America, America being a melting pot of immigrants, we are good at it. This has degraded significantly in the last 3 or 4 decades as illegal immigration has been a part of this equation. But that is a political topic.

Anyways I don't see this as being a historical topic unless we discuss differing trends in immigration through history.
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Old Today, 01:54 PM
 
308 posts, read 151,302 times
Reputation: 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandstander View Post
This thread appears to have escaped from the politics board where it belongs. The obvious topic, although the OP is doing his or her best to not come out and say it, is "How American are more recent immigrants?", a question that would only occur to someone who considered his or her self to be one of those "truer" Americans, and the more recent to be suspect.

You have your answer from several posters....anyone born here or naturalized as a citizen, is as American as anyone else. It is in the Constitution which makes no distinctions regarding how long anyone or their ancestors have been in the country. Your response was ..

...as though anyone who respected recent immigrants was probably lying because, you know, deep down inside we are all closet bigots.

I believe that we have provided you with your answers, that you do not like them is no cause for repeating the question.
That was not the Q. I am not a hater or a "nationalist" - I find that deeply offensive. This was about a sense of belonging. Trying to trace what "American" means in a deeper sense.
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Old Today, 01:56 PM
Status: ""Undeclared"" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Posting from my space yacht.
6,953 posts, read 2,613,182 times
Reputation: 12921
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandstander View Post
This thread appears to have escaped from the politics board where it belongs. The obvious topic, although the OP is doing his or her best to not come out and say it, is "How American are more recent immigrants?", a question that would only occur to someone who considered his or her self to be one of those "truer" Americans, and the more recent to be suspect.

You have your answer from several posters....anyone born here or naturalized as a citizen, is as American as anyone else. It is in the Constitution which makes no distinctions regarding how long anyone or their ancestors have been in the country. Your response was ..

...as though anyone who respected recent immigrants was probably lying because, you know, deep down inside we are all closet bigots.

I believe that we have provided you with your answers, that you do not like them is no cause for repeating the question.
I think maybe he's coming at this from the other direction and trying to get us to have a discussion that ultimately leads to the conclusion that we are a nation of immigrants and we must embrace the massive influx of Central and South American migration as a natural progression of historical population growth patterns. He's trying to lead us to a puddle of urine and get us to think it is water that we should drink.
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Old Today, 02:06 PM
 
308 posts, read 151,302 times
Reputation: 290
Think what you will but to label be a bigot is wrong, wrong, wrong. I have spent my time here championing diversity. Check my posting history.
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