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Old 12-02-2018, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Under Moon & Star
1,723 posts, read 616,474 times
Reputation: 9725

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Quote:
Originally Posted by droc31 View Post
The cold spell/fog of 536 could've been caused by a volcanic eruption. 1981 and 1982 were two of the coldest winters on record, which immediately followed the Mt. St. Helens eruption. 1992 and 93 were also very cold winters, which were preceded by the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in June 1991.
I doubt the St. Helens eruption had any effect at all on the winters of 1981 and 1982.

In the first place, St. Helens got a lot of press in the United States because it happened... well, in the United States. More specifically, in the Lower 48 and it killed a few dozen people. But it wasn't a very significant eruption on a geologic timescale. Pinatubo, for example, was an entire order of magnitude (ie, 10x) larger. St. Helens was about the same scale as the eruptions of Mt. Hudson (1991) and Puyehue (2011), both in Chile, and both virtually unknown outside of South America, which shows that their effects were entirely local. Further, St. Helens erupted in May of 1980. By the time the winter of 1980-81 rolled around, the cubic kilometer of gunk that had been ejected into the atmosphere had long-since settled to Earth.
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Old 12-02-2018, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,813 posts, read 26,472,375 times
Reputation: 27015
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hulsker 1856 View Post
I doubt the St. Helens eruption had any effect at all on the winters of 1981 and 1982.

In the first place, St. Helens got a lot of press in the United States because it happened... well, in the United States. More specifically, in the Lower 48 and it killed a few dozen people. But it wasn't a very significant eruption on a geologic timescale. Pinatubo, for example, was an entire order of magnitude (ie, 10x) larger. St. Helens was about the same scale as the eruptions of Mt. Hudson (1991) and Puyehue (2011), both in Chile, and both virtually unknown outside of South America, which shows that their effects were entirely local. Further, St. Helens erupted in May of 1980. By the time the winter of 1980-81 rolled around, the cubic kilometer of gunk that had been ejected into the atmosphere had long-since settled to Earth.
Looks like you are right, but it had more to do with the composition of the dust cloud.

Cliff Mass Weather and Climate Blog: Weather Impacts of the Mount Saint Helens Eruption

"Interestingly, this eruption had virtually no climatic effects. The reason: the effluent from the volcano had relatively little sulfur content (SO2). Injecting this gas into the stratosphere is the main way to produce long-lived volcanic hazes that spread around the planet and cool the lower atmosphere for a few years."
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Old 12-03-2018, 11:24 AM
 
2,250 posts, read 1,232,546 times
Reputation: 4313
1998 will go down as one of the worst years

p diddy released come with me,,,where he was allowed to sample Led Zeppelins "Kashmir"

I cant imagine famine or mass extinction even holding a candle to that debacle
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Old Yesterday, 01:57 PM
 
9,509 posts, read 2,600,084 times
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For most in Europe every year was the worst year to be alive....

It's a whole topic of historical study, but the everyday life was horrible - a good night's sleep was rare and fear was always your companion. There were exceptions, but most people were miserable most of the time.

If you read or watch Angelas Ashes you will get a small taste of it - and that was recent! Basically it was one piece of bad news after another and people were rarely healthy and comfortable.
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Old Today, 12:02 AM
 
Location: San Angelo, TX
1,665 posts, read 2,834,246 times
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^^^ This. Europe has been a terrible place for 10,000 years. The Hell on earth that European have inflicted on the human race...
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Old Today, 01:28 AM
 
1,790 posts, read 1,112,579 times
Reputation: 1862
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigiri View Post
For most in Europe every year was the worst year to be alive....

It's a whole topic of historical study, but the everyday life was horrible - a good night's sleep was rare and fear was always your companion. There were exceptions, but most people were miserable most of the time.

If you read or watch Angelas Ashes you will get a small taste of it - and that was recent! Basically it was one piece of bad news after another and people were rarely healthy and comfortable.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-81WdyD-8Ro
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