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Old 11-24-2018, 12:12 PM
 
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How long do Mass Extinctions take to actually do the job?

The job meaning, actually kill off all those species in order to be considered for the honor of the distinction of Mass Extinction.

Like the Great Oxygenation Event. How long to kill off all the anaerobic bacteria? The Yucatan Meteor Impact, how long to kill off species that were not in blast zone obviously?
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Old 11-26-2018, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
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It can take anywhere from dozens to thousands of years - but that's a mere blip in geological time.
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Old 12-01-2018, 09:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
It can take anywhere from dozens to thousands of years - but that's a mere blip in geological time.
So if a mass extinction level event does happen in modern times, we humans probably have enough time to adapt, prepare, and survive it.
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Old 12-01-2018, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Exeter, NH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
So if a mass extinction level event does happen in modern times, we humans probably have enough time to adapt, prepare, and survive it.
Sorry, but no. Anything big enough to be be called a mass extinction event would be far more than the human species could survive.

A major meteor hit? Supervolvcano like Yellowstone erupting? World War III with nuclear, chemical and biological weapons? Since approximately 1 person in a 100 million can survive for more than a couple of months without the support of society, even if the actual effects of the event were avoidable -- like for those with advance notice who were allowing into an underground government facility made to protect the "important" people -- their reserves would run out pretty quickly. The effects of the mass extinction event would make replenishing those reserves impossible, at least in the long term.

That being the case, there wouldn't be enough people left to repopulate, avoid problems of inbreeding, and create a sustainable and healthy population. And even though we theoretically could select a group of people that could rebuilt society afterwards, those would DEFINITELY not be the ones in this protected underground area. Instead, it would be filled with political bigwigs and their ultra-rich owners--virtually none of whom have a single skill other than "public speaking" (reading teleprompters) or using their lack of ethics & power over the financial system to make themselves incredibly wealthy.

Unfortunately, our Ruling Class is pretty much guaranteed to be the shortest-lived group you could possibly put in the protected capsule.
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Old Yesterday, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Under Moon & Star
1,712 posts, read 613,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NHartphotog View Post
Sorry, but no. Anything big enough to be be called a mass extinction event would be far more than the human species could survive.


The definition of 'mass extinction' isn't 'anything that would kill all human beings'.

The phrase 'mass extinction' is a colloquial term commonly used for the more precise scientific term 'extinction event'. For one, there have been several extinction events since humans (the first members of the genus Homo) appeared over two million years ago. At least two of these extinction events have occurred since the rise of modern humans about a quarter million years ago, not the least of which is the Holocene extinction, which is ongoing right now.

And since humans are rather obviously still here and in exceptional numbers, it is abundantly clear that that which fits either the common or precise term 'mass extinction' most certainly does not necessarily entail the elimination of humanity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NHartphotog View Post
Sorry, but no. Anything big enough to be be called a mass extinction event would be far more than the human species could survive.

A major meteor hit? Supervolvcano like Yellowstone erupting? World War III with nuclear, chemical and biological weapons? Since approximately 1 person in a 100 million can survive for more than a couple of months without the support of society, even if the actual effects of the event were avoidable -- like for those with advance notice who were allowing into an underground government facility made to protect the "important" people -- their reserves would run out pretty quickly. The effects of the mass extinction event would make replenishing those reserves impossible, at least in the long term.
Where to begin?

A 'big meteor' (you actually mean 'meteoroid' - a meteor is merely the visual trace a burning meteoroid leaves when passing through the atmosphere):
Your term 'big' is meaninglessly vague. Big rocks from space hit the Earth periodically. The one that gouged out that mile-wide hole in Arizona about 50,000 years ago was big, and I doubt any humans noticed. The Bosumtwi Crater in Ghana is over six miles wide, and would have impacted with al the humans living in the world at the time (about a million years ago) were in Africa. And they survived.

Now, it is certainly possible that if the impactor is 'big' enough, humans would be eliminated. However, it should be noted that humanity is the most super-adaptive megafauna species the planet has ever seen. Our numbers are vastly higher than anything that has ever approached our mass, and no species so large has ever made so much of the land area of the planet its habitat. Furthermore, it should be noted that the K-Pg extinction event killed of all carnivorous and herbivorous mammals. But the clade was nowhere near eliminated, and all the survivors were onmivorous, which humans are (we easily have the most diverse diet of all the four thousand or so mammal species on the planet).

Supervolcano:
The Yellowstone supervolcano has undergone three complete massive eruptions while humans walked the Earth, and humans still walk the Earth. And while the numbers of hunter-gathers now are small compared to humans who live in civilizations, they exceed in sheer numbers the small numbers who roamed the Earth during those eruptions. And while Yellowstone would be apocalyptic for much of North America, it's effects on other parts of the planet would be much less significant - far, far (far) below the level of species-threatening to Homo sapiens. So it would probably take as big an impactor as the planet has seen in the last half billion years to come close to knocking off Homo sapiens one and all.

Nuclear war:
Please. Stop 'learning' from vapid movies and bad science fiction.

What shines through in your post is that you dislike humanity and think that it is weak and that it sucks. That's fine, but such feelings are completely irrelevant to reality. You should stop letting your emotions color the way assess the facts.
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Old Today, 11:28 AM
 
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didn't it take almost 200 years for the dinosaur mass extinction to happen??

most of them starved due to the effects of the blast
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