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Old 12-14-2018, 05:45 AM
 
Location: USA
14,207 posts, read 7,644,470 times
Reputation: 10302

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Whiskey was an efficient way to sell corn, and trade. See the Whiskey Rebellion in western PA. Also, Bourbon is America's "Scotch". When men drank Whiskey in the West, the most prized was Kentucky Bourbon.
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Old 12-14-2018, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC
3,842 posts, read 3,816,900 times
Reputation: 6447
There is little about the South's motives for the ill-conceived and humiliating defeat of the Civil War that doesn't reek of whiskey consumption. Stupidity, evil, ill-judgement, recklessness. Bartender, another whiskey please.
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Old 12-14-2018, 09:08 AM
 
3,907 posts, read 2,155,095 times
Reputation: 6808
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gungnir View Post
Their average life expectancy was 40.

But as you point out 1/3 die before the age of 1, making those who live past that age average life expectancy 60.

It's a limitation of the mathematical mean, when a distribution is weighted towards the lower end.

Just pointing that out.

I’ll just leave this here... You can do the statistical analysis if you’d like. I said the age of one where the graph depicts the age cutoff at 5 (my bad) but you can still get the point I was making.

https://ourworldindata.org/child-mortality



Life expectancy data

https://ourworldindata.org/life-expectancy
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Old 12-14-2018, 10:54 AM
 
2,400 posts, read 6,148,633 times
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I have my family book from 1812 starting in Wolverhampton England,steel mills,father one of 13,born in 1885;
The interesting read are the various children deaths by plague an viruses because there were no med's,my mother died in 1935 from strep,she was treated by many blood transfusions I have article.
Influenza killed my fathers first wife in 1910.
I had ruptured appendex ,however you spell it in 1941 and got a shot of penicillin in butt every 4 hours with a nasty needle.
My fathers brother was killed in auto accident in 1919,seems strange.This brother survived the Klondike Gold Rush.I have copies of his letters.
Life back than was not easy.
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Old 12-14-2018, 02:08 PM
 
Location: ABQ
239 posts, read 339,786 times
Reputation: 139
Spirits were also more prevalent in the western territories because beer and other malt beverages would spoil due to the long distances to transport them from eastern breweries.

A good book to read on America's relationship with alcohol is Drink.
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Old 12-14-2018, 05:22 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
5,458 posts, read 4,187,440 times
Reputation: 6747
Drinking and gambling, drinking and gambling
That's what they did out west after driving cattle or rustling cattle, working on the railroad or robbing the trains. They went into town to **** away their money at cards and booze.
" Liquor in the front, poker in the rear "
How would you like to be in a saloon when those crazy gunmen started drinking ?
They were dangerous enough when sober.
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Old 12-14-2018, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Texas
33,113 posts, read 18,055,541 times
Reputation: 19119
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe from dayton View Post
Alcohol was considered to be healthy and a cure for many ills. A lot of the alcohol was also ciders, and beers, including small beers. Water was not considered to be a healthy drink.
Back in the 1800s many water sources weren't healthy. Public health didn't become a concern until the 20th century.
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Old 12-14-2018, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Billings, MT
9,227 posts, read 7,280,325 times
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A couple of things to think about:


1. There were more deaths in wagon trains on the Oregon Trail from cholera than from Indian attacks. The cholera most often came from bad water.


2. Many western towns had pretty strict gun control. Visitors were expected to turn their guns in at the Marshal's or Sheriff's office. They could pick them up on their way out of town. Residents didn't carry guns. BUT, they had them, and knew how to use them (most of the men were Civil War Veterans, after all).
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Old 12-15-2018, 03:07 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
11,307 posts, read 11,706,881 times
Reputation: 17659
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe from dayton View Post
Alcohol was considered to be healthy and a cure for many ills. A lot of the alcohol was also ciders, and beers, including small beers. Water was not considered to be a healthy drink.
In the 19th century, water was not a healthy drink. From ancient times, alcohol has been added to water to kill the bacteria that would kill you. Either boil it, for coffee or tea, or add alcohol. The first chlorinated city water system was not installed in the US until well into the 20th century. Sewage treatment was unknown. Cholera and typhoid were rampant.
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Old 12-15-2018, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Itinerant
5,390 posts, read 3,842,937 times
Reputation: 4222
Quote:
Originally Posted by SWFL_Native View Post
I’ll just leave this here... You can do the statistical analysis if you’d like. I said the age of one where the graph depicts the age cutoff at 5 (my bad) but you can still get the point I was making.

https://ourworldindata.org/child-mortality



Life expectancy data

https://ourworldindata.org/life-expectancy
You're missing my point.

If an average lifespan was 40 years, but 1/3 of infants die in their first year, survivors can expect an average lifespan of 60 years.

So someone who was 40 could, like we do, expect 20-30 more years barring serious injury or untreatable disease.

Here's a good example Romans average life span 35 years. The Lex Villia Annalis states Consuls must be 42 years of age. So what does that tell us? That 42 was not uncommon and certainly not venerable. Which is understandable when you consider Julius Caesar was 51 when he crossed The Rubicon, and Pompey was 57 when killed by Ptolemy. Even the US has a age limit of 35 on the presidency, giving only 1 year before average lifespan post first term.

The confusion lies in what average lifespan is, mathematically the mean is the sum of values divided by the count of values. Which if loaded towards the bottom end (younger) will present a figure that is deceptively low.

Quick hypothetical, 100 year old guy dies, average lifespan 100 years, infant also dies at birth, average lifespan is now 50, mother of infant dies in same childbirth aged 20, average lifespan is now 40. Do you now see what I mean about average lifespans.
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