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Old 02-01-2019, 10:59 AM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
12,523 posts, read 7,948,892 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiGeekGuest View Post
The historical events that occurred in the Congo, & in the surrounding Portuguese, French, & German colonies, is analogous to the historical events that occurred in the antebellum United States.

For any historical account to ignore the variously-named & long-lasting systems of race-based forced labor & its long-lasting impact & influences is to deem that accounting guilty of historical distortion, evasion, & harmful revisionism.
I can offer this: Slaves in the US were expensive. Treatment was harsh, but they were valued property.


Slaves in Africa were not even owned. They were forced to work by men they did not know and their women were held captive in order to force the slaves to work. They were shot for sport and worked to death and then left to die along the roads or rivers. On top of that, the slavery in Congo happened long after the Civil War had ended, and was kept secret long into the 20th century. Ironically, Sanford, FL (Trayvon Martin) was named in honor of a man who promoted what was happening in Congo. He was a US Ambassador to Belgium and had been completely fooled by the deception of King Leopold.

There really isn't much of a parallel between the two events.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Leopold%27s_Ghost
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Old 02-02-2019, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Long Island, NYUSA, Earth, Solar System, Milky Way.
7,111 posts, read 2,139,284 times
Reputation: 1901
Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
I can offer this: Slaves in the US were expensive. Treatment was harsh, but they were valued property.


Slaves in Africa were not even owned. They were forced to work by men they did not know and their women were held captive in order to force the slaves to work. They were shot for sport and worked to death and then left to die along the roads or rivers. On top of that, the slavery in Congo happened long after the Civil War had ended, and was kept secret long into the 20th century. Ironically, Sanford, FL (Trayvon Martin) was named in honor of a man who promoted what was happening in Congo. He was a US Ambassador to Belgium and had been completely fooled by the deception of King Leopold.

There really isn't much of a parallel between the two events.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Leopold%27s_Ghost
This is the History Forum; the parallel between the two events is the historical distortion, evasion, & revisionism surrounding & masking the events, i.e. 'History rhymes'.

Here in the US, the propaganda the Lost Cause adherents peddled ( & continue to peddle ) was/is not only benign myths, the lies distort history.

As Mr Loewen writes:

Quote:
The Confederates won with the pen (and the noose) what they could not win on the battlefield: the cause of white supremacy and the dominant understanding of what the war was all about. We are still digging ourselves out from under the misinformation that they spread, which has manifested in both our history books and our public monuments.
Loewen: How the Confederates won

https://www.milforddailynews.com/art...NION/150709293

The author of King Leopold's Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror and Heroism in Colonial Africa, Adam Hochschild's likens the historical distortion, evasion, & harmful revisionism about colonialism almost anywhere in Africa to the same in US:

Quote:
...What happened in the Congo—and the similar, tragically ignored bloodbath in surrounding Portuguese, French, and German colonies—was not genocide. ... However, his letter does not respond to a principal criticism I had of the exhibit, namely that it displayed virtually nothing about a major cause of this high death toll, the colony’s pervasive, long-lasting forced labor system.

For a museum exhibit about colonialism almost anywhere in Africa to ignore this is to be like one of those elegant restored plantation houses in the American South where the tour guides avoid mentioning slavery. ...
‘In the Heart of Darkness’

https://www.nybooks.com/articles/200...t-of-darkness/
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Old 02-02-2019, 09:18 AM
 
18,686 posts, read 15,592,299 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
A culture and attitude to break free wasn't present enough among slaves to consolidate plans. The dominant emotions were fear and timidity. Plus, there was no real mechanism to communicate together between plantations and groups, to plan anything, even if they got to that point. Also, access to sufficient weapons and familiarity with using them was another matter.

John Brown tried to remedy some of that, but falsely assumed that large numbers were at the point of open rebellion.
They were vastly outnumbered in any case. It could never have happened IMO.
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Old 02-07-2019, 07:03 AM
 
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Some slaves did have access to a gun, perhaps not an arsenal. Some slaves were allowed to hunt and supplement their family's rations, and we know that the slave York, from the Journey of discovery carried a gun. Simon Grey also was allowed to carried gun in order to carry out his duties for his owner. After the Stono Rebellion plantation owners knew that if there were many weapons on the plantation slaves would steal them. Maroons and Black Seminoles were basically slaves who freed themselves.
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Old Today, 07:01 PM
 
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There were the usual impoverished, losers on the battle field, & criminals but remember the plantation system was a 3 way street between metropolitan Europa, settler Americas & the Africa coast from Cacheu to Angola (as well as Mozambique) & slaves were being breed from at least the 18th century in the coastal ports of the later.

The dominant ideology then (& one must admit the current generation's fruit hasn't fallen too far from the tree) was "God is greed & greed is good".
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Old Today, 07:22 PM
Status: "On punishment for offending someone. Again. :)" (set 22 days ago)
 
3,688 posts, read 1,850,504 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
They were vastly outnumbered in any case. It could never have happened IMO.
No they weren't. It was the Europeans who were outnumbered. I have a book of the 1890 census totals for Mississippi and "coloreds" dominated the region...which makes sense because it was their land. I believe this is why the 1890 census records were destroyed. It listed nationality and we would have proof of not only the Native Americans (who were not "near extinction") but evidence that would cause the conscientious researcher to probe why there were more blacks than whites in the South. The fact that there were more "blacks" in the South after the Civil War is not a secret. The (real) reason why there were more blacks is what some wish to remain hidden.
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Old Today, 08:17 PM
 
18,686 posts, read 15,592,299 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by treemoni View Post
No they weren't. It was the Europeans who were outnumbered. I have a book of the 1890 census totals for Mississippi and "coloreds" dominated the region...which makes sense because it was their land. I believe this is why the 1890 census records were destroyed. It listed nationality and we would have proof of not only the Native Americans (who were not "near extinction") but evidence that would cause the conscientious researcher to probe why there were more blacks than whites in the South. The fact that there were more "blacks" in the South after the Civil War is not a secret. The (real) reason why there were more blacks is what some wish to remain hidden.
I didnít realize that. They had no weapons though, no horses or transportation, no tents or other means of shelter, no food of their own etc. and the disadvantage of not knowing their area beyond the plantation.
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