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Old 12-29-2018, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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One of the more amusing accounts of the journey is when they stayed with a tribe who believed that if someone of great courage or strength or other desirable characteristics had sex with their wife, they would then gain those characteristics when they had sex with her afterward.

Since York, Clark's slave, was apparently a strongly built man, he was regularly requested to service the wives of the tribe members to the point that the husband would stand guard outside his home during the act to prevent anyone else from trying to take him away.
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Old 12-29-2018, 07:16 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA
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Apparently some of our famous American explorers were a rather frisky bunch. I recall reading something similar about the Arctic explorer Admiral Robert Peary and his chief aide Matthew Henson during their time living with the Inuits in Greenland while staging for one of their polar expeditions. Seems they fathered at least two children and left them behind and forgotten.
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Old 12-30-2018, 07:38 AM
 
872 posts, read 544,800 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
One of the more amusing accounts of the journey is when they stayed with a tribe who believed that if someone of great courage or strength or other desirable characteristics had sex with their wife, they would then gain those characteristics when they had sex with her afterward.

Since York, Clark's slave, was apparently a strongly built man, he was regularly requested to service the wives of the tribe members to the point that the husband would stand guard outside his home during the act to prevent anyone else from trying to take him away.
Pretty sure that’s not on most folk’s L&C Heritage Trail travel itineraries. Nor re-enactment programs.





Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
Apparently some of our famous American explorers were a rather frisky bunch. I recall reading something similar about the Arctic explorer Admiral Robert Peary and his chief aide Matthew Henson during their time living with the Inuits in Greenland while staging for one of their polar expeditions. Seems they fathered at least two children and left them behind and forgotten.
Not surprising.

Young, fit, virile men + access to women + native cultures with different sexual mores = Lots of “activity” and the consequences thereof.


More than once, the Brule Sioux offered L & C several women from their tribe for sexual use, as a gesture of diplomacy and hospitality. Even after they were rejected, a couple of the women went so far as to trail the departing Expedition party for some distance. According to Clark, the Arikaras also practiced this custom.

Last edited by mingna; 12-30-2018 at 07:56 AM..
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Old 12-30-2018, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Iowa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LilyMae521 View Post
There is a monument on a bluff along old US highway 75 in the southern part of Sioux City Iowa that is dedicated to the only member of the expedition that died during the expedition - Sargent Charles Floyd. Historians have deduced from the journals that he likely died from appendicitis.


OP, if you liked the carving at Pompey's Pillar, check out El Morro National Monument in New Mexico. A veritable graffiti rock from days of yore. :-)
As a child, I remember passing the Floyd monument hundreds of times in the family car, it always made me happy to see it, because for a kid, it was a long ride to get to Sioux City and that meant we were almost there.

The bod of Sergeant Floyd received a lot of exposure. He was moved 4 times. In 1806 on the return trip, Lewis & Clark visited his grave to find it had been opened by the natives and only halfway filled back in with dirt. Later in 1810, Clark did an interview and told of some news he had heard, of a Sioux Chief who had dug him up again, and buried his son with Sgt. Floyd. Later in 1857, a flood eroded his grave and his bones were poking out of the side of the bluff. Men with ropes hanging off the side of the bluff, dug him out and gathered his bones, mostly intact, and reburied him further uphill. Then in the 1890's when they wanted to build a monument, his cedar grave maker had been whittled down so much by souvenir hunters, they couldn't find his grave, he was lost and they spent much effort to find him again, and dig him up one more time, to put him safe and sound in his new monument. Poor guy, I hope Sioux City never has an earthquake and his monument gets knocked over, you know within 15 minutes some coyotes would come along and pick a bone or two. Wouldn't surprise me.

This link has the most detail about Sergeant Floyd I could find,

https://www.lewisandclarkinkentucky...._article.shtml
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Old 12-30-2018, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
Apparently some of our famous American explorers were a rather frisky bunch. I recall reading something similar about the Arctic explorer Admiral Robert Peary and his chief aide Matthew Henson during their time living with the Inuits in Greenland while staging for one of their polar expeditions. Seems they fathered at least two children and left them behind and forgotten.
I saw that documentary, too. They lived with the people in Thule. They interviewed one of Peary's descendants, and he said that in the next village there were people descended from the "other kind of white man, the black kind", meaning Henson. Apparently Peary's American descendants were not happy to hear about this, but Henson's American descendants were interested in learning more. I don't know if there was ever any sort of followup.
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Old 12-30-2018, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
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Another great book on this topic is Out West, A Journey through Lewis and Clark's America by Dayton Duncun. The author re-traced the route of Lewis and Clark in the 1990s in a VW bus. He wrote about the towns, people and places along the way as he saw them in the 1990s, and contrasted that with how Lewis and Clark saw the same places along their journey. The reviews on Amazon or any book selling web site are all very good, and I would rate the book with 4 to 5 stars. I love the rules of the road that Duncan develops along the way.
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Old 12-30-2018, 11:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Matthew_MI View Post
Has anyone followed their trail? I read a book about them when I was 20. At the time I never had gone out west. I became fascinated by their story, exploring western America before it became populated. Before natives saw a white man. That summer, in 2006 during the 200 year anniversary, I flew out to Portland, OR. Rented a car and drove to the national historic park in Astoria. Drove from there east, through Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana. Rafted the Yellowstone River. In Montana stopped to see Pompey's pillar national monument. It's pretty cool, Lewis & Clark's names/dates are still inscribed on the stone to see, it's encased in glass and surrounded by lasers for protection. Continued to St. Louis to explore the museum underneath the Arch. Have any of you found other interesting sites along the trail? I found it sad that Lewis committed suicide(or was murdered), after surviving a dangerous but successful trip.
Sure, I live in Montana. I think I've been to all these
https://www.visitmt.com/things-to-do...ark-trail.html
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Old 01-06-2019, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
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I've been over a lot of their journey as I live in Idaho.

Lewis and Clark met Sacajawea about 25 miles from where I live.

One interesting thing few folks know is a .50 caliber air rifle went along on the trip and was the most commonly used rifle they carried for hunting game. The rifle used copper canisters with valves in them for the air supply. The canisters were pumped pumped back up to pressure with a hand pump once the air pressure was expended.

Since the air rifle didn't sent up a cloud of smoke or have a loud report when fired, the game didn't startle and take off like it did when gunpowder was used. And since there was no gunpowder to get wet, the rifle was also more dependable than the others.
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Old 01-07-2019, 08:09 AM
 
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The air gun fascinated many tribal members, and Lewis often demonstrated its usage in order to “wow” and entertain them.
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Old 01-08-2019, 04:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew_MI View Post
Has anyone followed their trail?
I live near the Missouri River, and there are signs and markers everywhere for the Lewis and Clark Trail. I have probably about 15 or 20 of these markers practically in my backyard. I can honestly say that through the decades I've driven along several huge stretches of Lewis & Clark's Trail from St. Louis to Pierre, South Dakota, even though I never intentionally meant to follow their trail. I did this while on vacations to either Missouri, Nebraska, Iowa or South Dakota.

About 4 or 5 years ago I met a man who claimed to be one of the g-g-g-grandsons of William Clark. He was recreating Lewis and Clark's expedition in reverse. He built a small boat and was sailing it down the Missouri River from the headwaters in upper Montana to St. Louis. I stumbled into him while visiting Fort Osage, an 1808 Indian fort along the Missouri River located outside of Kansas City. After the L&C expedition William Clark was the commander of the Fort Osage for about 5 years.
( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Osage )

I assume that the guy's story was legit because the curators of the Fort Osage were hosting him for the weekend and were giving him the run of the place. It was one of his planned stops during the trip; he had the boat moored near the fort. I'm assuming that he finished the trip because from Fort Osage he had only 230 miles to go before he reached St. Louis.
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