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Old 12-27-2018, 09:28 PM
 
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Has anyone followed their trail? I read a book about them when I was 20. At the time I never had gone out west. I became fascinated by their story, exploring western America before it became populated. Before natives saw a white man. That summer, in 2006 during the 200 year anniversary, I flew out to Portland, OR. Rented a car and drove to the national historic park in Astoria. Drove from there east, through Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana. Rafted the Yellowstone River. In Montana stopped to see Pompey's pillar national monument. It's pretty cool, Lewis & Clark's names/dates are still inscribed on the stone to see, it's encased in glass and surrounded by lasers for protection. Continued to St. Louis to explore the museum underneath the Arch. Have any of you found other interesting sites along the trail? I found it sad that Lewis committed suicide(or was murdered), after surviving a dangerous but successful trip.
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Old 12-27-2018, 09:57 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
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Their starting point is only about 15 miles down the road from where I live. I used to take my metal detector along the river there hoping to find some old coins or artifacts of their journey, but all I ever found were modern bullet shells and pull tabs.
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Old 12-27-2018, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew_MI View Post
Has anyone followed their trail? I read a book about them when I was 20. At the time I never had gone out west. I became fascinated by their story, exploring western America before it became populated. Before natives saw a white man. That summer, in 2006 during the 200 year anniversary, I flew out to Portland, OR. Rented a car and drove to the national historic park in Astoria. Drove from there east, through Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana. Rafted the Yellowstone River. In Montana stopped to see Pompey's pillar national monument. It's pretty cool, Lewis & Clark's names/dates are still inscribed on the stone to see, it's encased in glass and surrounded by lasers for protection. Continued to St. Louis to explore the museum underneath the Arch. Have any of you found other interesting sites along the trail? I found it sad that Lewis committed suicide(or was murdered), after surviving a dangerous but successful trip.
Was the book Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose?

https://www.amazon.com/Undaunted-Cou...06507637&psc=1

I picked it up at a book sale somewhere. It is fascinating. Yes, a sad end to Lewis's life, but when all the details are there, it does sound like suicide. Something had to be odd about him. It was said that "melancholy" ran in his family, and he couldn't seem to find a woman who would marry him.

The book has so many excerpts from their journals, particularly Merriwether Lewis's. They describe the huge herds of bison and other animals migrating across open spaces, a sight that no longer exists. Also, the realistic story of Sacagawea is covered.
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Old 12-28-2018, 06:01 AM
 
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There is a monument on a bluff along old US highway 75 in the southern part of Sioux City Iowa that is dedicated to the only member of the expedition that died during the expedition - Sargent Charles Floyd. Historians have deduced from the journals that he likely died from appendicitis.


OP, if you liked the carving at Pompey's Pillar, check out El Morro National Monument in New Mexico. A veritable graffiti rock from days of yore. :-)

Last edited by LilyMae521; 12-28-2018 at 06:10 AM..
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Old 12-28-2018, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Jewel Lake (Sagle) Idaho
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Through Idaho the "Lolo Motorway" (a primitive dirt road) follows the trails that Lewis and Clark took through this country. I've done it on adventure motorcycles a couple times. Interesting reading some of the interpretive signs along the way and contemplating what they endured.
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Old 12-28-2018, 11:30 AM
Status: ""I yam what I yam, and that's all what I yam." -- Popeye" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: New Mexico
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I lived along the Missouri River west of St. Louis and there are identified features and campsites that locals know about. A friend was part of the keelboat crew that reenacted the trip up the river. The lower Missouri River (village of La Charette) was the limit of "civilization" in 1804. Some of the original party members settled in Missouri. John Colter (party member and later "discoverer" of Yellowstone) was buried near New Haven, MO in 1812. George "Peg Leg" Shannon is buried in Palmyra and has a county named after him.

I once folowed the Santa Fe Trail west to the Spanish Peaks and then picked up the rest of the way on a different trip. The wagon ruts are still there in central Kansas near Ft. Larned. I followed the Oregon Trail for some distance up to Fort Laramie and Guernsey WY (very deep ruts).
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Old 12-28-2018, 11:43 AM
 
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I managed to get to some of the signature events in; St.Louis, Arrow Rock Mo., Kansas City, Atchison, Omaha, Salmon Idaho, then I traveled on my own through the Columbia and on to Seaside Oregon. I got a chance to meet many historians whose life work was this expedition. I met some of the Lemhi Shoshone as well as the members of a group of re-enactors who were following the trail. This was in 2004 -2006 when there was a lot of excitement about it.

Its interesting That IMO I found that there was less excitement about the Civil War during its commemorative events. Perhaps it is due to the fact that there are an estimated 25,000 documents on the Civil War and only two definitive books on the Journey of discovery.

The Devoto book, Undaunted Courage and one other book on the diaries that escapes me are the three main books. I met a relative of one the members, Sgt. Gass , who said all the men wrote diaries, but only two versions were compiled. I should get the Patrick Gass Journal book.

Last edited by thriftylefty; 12-28-2018 at 12:29 PM..
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Old 12-28-2018, 01:06 PM
 
872 posts, read 546,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew_MI View Post
Has anyone followed their trail? I read a book about them when I was 20. At the time I never had gone out west. I became fascinated by their story, exploring western America before it became populated. Before natives saw a white man. That summer, in 2006 during the 200 year anniversary, I flew out to Portland, OR. Rented a car and drove to the national historic park in Astoria. Drove from there east, through Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana. Rafted the Yellowstone River. In Montana stopped to see Pompey's pillar national monument. It's pretty cool, Lewis & Clark's names/dates are still inscribed on the stone to see, it's encased in glass and surrounded by lasers for protection. Continued to St. Louis to explore the museum underneath the Arch. Have any of you found other interesting sites along the trail? I found it sad that Lewis committed suicide(or was murdered), after surviving a dangerous but successful trip.
The closest I got was whitewater rafting down a section of the Snake river, but as with so many areas they traversed, I’m sure time and development has changed its character greatly.

Some of the photos of areas along their journey are spectacular. It is said everyone in the Expedition was left speechless from the striking beauty of the rock formations while canoeing the White Cliffs area of the upper Missouri.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Toyman at Jewel Lake View Post
Through Idaho the "Lolo Motorway" (a primitive dirt road) follows the trails that Lewis and Clark took through this country. I've done it on adventure motorcycles a couple times. Interesting reading some of the interpretive signs along the way and contemplating what they endured.
Their journey encompassed sailing, paddling by boat and canoe, portaging through rough terrain, horseback, and walking. All while carrying the necessary supplies, hunting and foraging for food and shelter, and in the case of Sacagawea, birthing, carrying, and tending to the needs of a newborn/baby. Amazing, especially their outbound journey through the Rockies, mostly on foot, while nearly starving. It really showed how hardy humans can be, if forced to. And with a lot of help from many of the Native American tribes.



Quote:
Originally Posted by thriftylefty View Post
I managed to get to some of the signature events in; St.Louis, Arrow Rock Mo., Kansas City, Atchison, Omaha, Salmon Idaho, then I traveled on my own through the Columbia and on to Seaside Oregon. I got a chance to meet many historians whose life work was this expedition. I met some of the Lemhi Shoshone as well as the members of a group of re-enactors who were following the trail. This was in 2004 -2006 when there was a lot of excitement about it.

Its interesting That IMO I found that there was less excitement about the Civil War during its commemorative events. Perhaps it is due to the fact that there are an estimated 25,000 documents on the Civil War and only two definitive books on the Journey of discovery.

The Devoto book, Undaunted Courage and one other book on the diaries that escapes me are the three main books. I met a relative of one the members, Sgt. Gass , who said all the men wrote diaries, but only two versions were compiled. I should get the Patrick Gass Journal book.
Ken Burns, famous for his Civil War documentary, also made one of that briefly covered the Lewis and Clark expedition. Of all the books I’ve read on the Expedition, I enjoyed the National Geographic abridged version “The Journals of Lewis and Clark” the most. Condensed, but with enough information for the lay person, drawn mostly from the diaries of Lewis and Clark.

I wonder if re-enactments actually stayed true to the hardships of their journey.
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Old 12-29-2018, 06:52 AM
 
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The story is insane.
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Old 12-29-2018, 10:38 AM
 
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Originally Posted by madison999 View Post
The story is insane.
Indeed. And not just for the physical feats, but also the intellectual feats displayed by both Lewis and Clark.

Although he may have been an atrocious speller, Clark was a talented cartographer. Due mainly to his gifted ability in dead reckoning distances traveled, his estimate of the total distance (4162 miles) the Expedition traveled from Camp Wood to their endpoint at the Pacific Ocean was off by only 40 miles.

How many of us can do that today?
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