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Old Yesterday, 04:33 PM
 
Location: equator
2,842 posts, read 1,222,752 times
Reputation: 6914

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^^^Totally agree. That "Greatest Generation" label always irked me. My dad was successful, but he was the first to admit he had everything handed to him on a silver platter after WWII. So without all that, how successful would he have been? We'll never know. But no vets today are getting all those hand-outs.

I too, believe that today's (or any other) generation would rise to the occasion, as they did.
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Old Yesterday, 09:31 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,940 posts, read 26,162,449 times
Reputation: 8400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angorlee View Post
When the greatest generation entered the American scene in the 1930s every American city was a great, safe, clean place to live. By the time the so called 'greatest generation' started to retire in the mid 1980s every American city was a dirty, crime ridden dump. That speaks for itself. Go to youtube and look at 'Remembering Chicago' and see for yourself. Since I once lived in Chicago I bought the tapes of the interviews of the people that lived during the 1930s and early 40s. One women interviewed said that on a hot summer night(there was no air conditioning back then) she would walk down to the nearest park in her pajamas with a pillow and blanket and sleep in the part without one thought that someone was going to do her harm. And a person could do that in any park in the entire city. Fast forward to today and you know what I mean. So if the 'greatest generation' was so great then why didn't they keep those peaceful times instead of overseeing the fall of our great cities.
Tom Brokaw made up the name as a title for one of his books. Before that, they were called The Depression kids. That's what they were before and after the book. Their lives were formed by the Depression. WWII just piled onto that.
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Old Today, 06:59 AM
 
28,224 posts, read 45,666,327 times
Reputation: 14590
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
I had the privilege of being raised by two World War II vets. I know my father always had trouble with that "Greatest Generation" label before he died back in 2009. He did make several comments though late in his life that got my attention. He looked back on his service in the Navy which began at age 17 and he marveled at the amount of responsibility that he and so many young people were given. He wondered how they were able to do the things that were assigned them. Yet, most did. Another comment he made several times was that young people are picked to serve in the military because they lack fear (and often good judgment) and will do just about anything you order them to do.

There were some fundamental differences in life when my father grew up as a poor child in a large family in Idaho. First, was the lack of awareness of life outside of where they lived. Because of this there was a lack of resentment and envy of others (in most cases). Second, you could trust others because everyone knew who you were. You couldn't get away with anything. Third, children were parented in a very authoritarian way (which my dad disliked). You did what your father said to do OR ELSE. Fourth, history classes in school painted a rose-colored view of America. Fifth, children were taught not to question authority.

Because of all of this, young people who were drafted or who volunteered for the armed services could be counted on to follow orders and undertake about any hazardous thing.

I don't think this generation was unique. I think if the circumstances called for it, the people in this country today would find a way to prevail over their enemies as well. It would be done differently and undoubtedly with imaginative use of high technology. I do retain the view that Americans are "can do" people. When our backs are to the wall, we can solve just about any problem.
Have you read the book “Boys in the Boat” about the US rowing team that went to the Berlin Olympics?
It followed the young men who crewed for the University of Washington and won the Olympic Trials—
A fairly epoch event in the 30’s when college rowing was followed by many more people than now
Those young men were products of the Great Depression which was such a strong factor in their early lives and influenced their capacity to sacrifice and endure...
We listened to the Audible version read by Edward Hoerrmann — was an emotional experience —and I read the book as well...
It is something that high school students should read as part of their American History/English curricula so they could get a much more personal understanding of what life was like in the 20-30s for most of America...

The book is well-researched and the writer has very engaging style—very enjoyable even though balanced with facts and personal insight...
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Old Today, 07:28 AM
 
9,484 posts, read 16,157,197 times
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OP, your premise is false.
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Old Today, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
3,747 posts, read 3,353,575 times
Reputation: 6778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angorlee View Post
When the greatest generation entered the American scene in the 1930s every American city was a great, safe, clean place to live.
Where did you get that idea? In the 1930's American cities were in upheaval as waves of migrants from rural areas sought economic relief from the Great Depression, with rampant poverty, unemployment, crime, gang violence, sweatshops, racism and other prejudices, and filthy tenements not to mention corrupt officials and police. The difference was that stuff was whitewashed, ignored, or shrugged off.


Quote:
By the time the so called 'greatest generation' started to retire in the mid 1980s every American city was a dirty, crime ridden dump.

By the mid-1980's America had begun to reverse the decline of the inner cities. Mayor Giuliani in New York in the early 1990's really got a handle on crime and filth by using the so-called "broken windows policy", fixing broken windows in city-owned buildings so the neighborhood would not degrade, and arresting "turnstile jumpers" in the subways to indicate that petty crime would not be tolerated.


There's always a fine line between cracking down on crime and hassling decent but poor residents.
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Old Today, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
7,687 posts, read 2,428,515 times
Reputation: 10621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angorlee View Post
When the greatest generation entered the American scene in the 1930s every American city was a great, safe, clean place to live. By the time the so called 'greatest generation' started to retire in the mid 1980s every American city was a dirty, crime ridden dump. That speaks for itself. Go to youtube and look at 'Remembering Chicago' and see for yourself. Since I once lived in Chicago I bought the tapes of the interviews of the people that lived during the 1930s and early 40s. One women interviewed said that on a hot summer night(there was no air conditioning back then) she would walk down to the nearest park in her pajamas with a pillow and blanket and sleep in the part without one thought that someone was going to do her harm. And a person could do that in any park in the entire city. Fast forward to today and you know what I mean. So if the 'greatest generation' was so great then why didn't they keep those peaceful times instead of overseeing the fall of our great cities.

They were overrun by Hoi Polloi of younger generations.
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Old Today, 09:16 AM
 
503 posts, read 386,732 times
Reputation: 1086
Quote:
Originally Posted by xPlorer48 View Post
Sorry that I am off topic here, but I fervently wish that we could have candidates of this caliber again plus Theodore Roosevelt. Not that they didn’t have their faults, but we surely need a strong moral capable leader today more than ever. And, on topic, yes, I hope that any other generation would have responded the same.
With today's media it will never happen again. The outrageous and the extreme sell's papers and keep people watching their TV's. Obsessively glued to their 'entertainment' news channels regardless of what side you're on. The reasonable candidates will never again get air time as the talking heads will only focus on the extreme candidates of the day. The only way to get noticed and have a microphone is if your say outrageous things. We have seen the end of the reasonable candidate.
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Old Today, 09:52 AM
 
18,701 posts, read 10,255,810 times
Reputation: 18447
By the end of the WWII generation, the most virulent diseases had been defeated or put on the ropes.

Laws to end the effects of racism had been passed, and a nation had resolved not even to approach the brink of what the Nazis had committed.

Men had walked on the moon.

The following generation, my generation, we Boomers, has done nothing comparable, and our time is now at its twilight. If anything, we've slipped on all fronts.

Last edited by Ralph_Kirk; Today at 10:04 AM..
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Old Today, 09:55 AM
 
7,603 posts, read 2,979,100 times
Reputation: 20128
Quote:
Originally Posted by loves2read View Post
Have you read the book “Boys in the Boat” about the US rowing team that went to the Berlin Olympics?
It followed the young men who crewed for the University of Washington and won the Olympic Trials—
A fairly epoch event in the 30’s when college rowing was followed by many more people than now
Those young men were products of the Great Depression which was such a strong factor in their early lives and influenced their capacity to sacrifice and endure...
We listened to the Audible version read by Edward Hoerrmann — was an emotional experience —and I read the book as well...
It is something that high school students should read as part of their American History/English curricula so they could get a much more personal understanding of what life was like in the 20-30s for most of America...

The book is well-researched and the writer has very engaging style—very enjoyable even though balanced with facts and personal insight...
That book is one of my favorites! The tenacity of that generation, or at any rate, those boys, is remarkable. Absolutely remarkable.
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Old Today, 10:44 AM
 
184 posts, read 34,857 times
Reputation: 114
There was less crime in the 1980s compared to now.
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