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Old 01-17-2019, 01:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dozerbear View Post
Fourth, even if generators could have been built, it's very likely they would have been knocked out by the pre invasion bombing and naval bombardment.

anything big and standing on that beach would have been blown off by just the naval bombardment alone. It would have been a waste of time and resources for the Germans, that's why they never attempted it.
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Old 01-17-2019, 01:52 PM
 
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what the Germans needed was a couple of A-Bombs to defend their ground against what the Allies had, anything short than that the Germans had no chance.


Fighting a 2 front war against the Soviets didn't help much the Germans on D-Day......they were done. No generators or all the electricity in Europe would have helped the Germans.
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Old 01-17-2019, 02:36 PM
Status: "securing our Northern border" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
20,843 posts, read 21,025,016 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dozerbear View Post
No. First, the Germans didn't know where the landings were going to be, thanks to a brilliant allied deception campaign. Second, it would require massive amounts of power, and there wasn't enough reserve generating capacity to supply it. Third, no generators could have been built near the beaches, due to the large amount of copper and other strategic materials needed that were in very short supply. They would also need fuel, likely oil or coal, and the Germans were short on both, especially oil. Fourth, even if generators could have been built, it's very likely they would have been knocked out by the pre invasion bombing and naval bombardment.
could have used thousands of electric eels
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Old 01-17-2019, 03:15 PM
 
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Germany had lost the war when they failed to capture enough oil for a modern army, most of the war was fought between Russia and Germany with battles involving millions of men...


the probable reason for the invasion was to make sure Russia did not conquer all of Europe....to be sure to put things in perspective consider the fact that the US sent two million Studebaker trucks to Russia and much much more hardware
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Old 01-22-2019, 06:55 AM
 
Location: London
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The Royal Navy blockade starved Germany, and the Axis, of vital resources, including food (animal & human), coal and oil. The Royal Navy controlled the eastern Atlantic, the Atlantic entrance to the Mediterranean, the eastern Mediterranean with even a base all through the war off Italy at Malta. Britain's land forces were from Turkey to Libya. Essentially the British surrounded Europe, controlling the sea lanes inflicting a highly successful economic blockade. The Royal Navy ensured the conflict with Germany would continue. Britain's war was partially an economic war.

During 1941, Italy was only able to import 600,000 tons of fuel with 163,000 tons given to the navy. At this point the monthly consumption had to be reduced to 60,000 tons. During this period the older battleships were removed from service. In early 1942 the bottom was hit with reserves down to 14,000 tons. At the end of April, it was possible to import 50,000 tons of fuel oil per month from Romania. Suspending escort and mining missions by Italian cruisers reduced consumption. At the end of November 1942 the oil fuel reserve was about 70,000 tons plus all which was stored aboard the ships, This was enough for one sortie of the whole fleet. At the end of December, the old battleships Cesare, Duilio and Doria were removed from service.

Only 3,000 tons were received in February 1943 and in March and April the modern destroyers had to be removed from escort missions. Expecting a possible Allied invasion, the remaining destroyers were reactivated along with the battleships which had only half their bunkers filled with diesel fuel. When Italy surrendered on September 8th 1943, their fleet only had enough fuel to reach Malta to surrender.

Every German operation against the British had to be decisive whereas the British could lose to the Germans while still asserting economic pressure in its favour. This was the British way of war being very good at it. Britain used similar tactics against Germany in WW1 to devastating effects.

The Germans like most of Europe relied on imported oil, raw materials and food (animal & human). Romania did not produce enough oil. France imported much of its coal from the UK which was now cut off. Germany had to give France coal, depriving German industry, to keep French power stations operating. Germany never had the fuel, never mind the generating equipment to engage in large scale electrical projects. That is if these electric fences and charge water would have been effective of course.
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Old 01-22-2019, 11:01 AM
 
Location: London
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elvis44102 View Post
the probable reason for the invasion was to make sure Russia did not conquer all of Europe....to be sure to put things in perspective consider the fact that the US sent two million Studebaker trucks to Russia and much much more hardware
The reason for Barbarossa was for Germany to gain resources to manufacture mainly planes to engage in the coming air war. The 1942 Washington conference allocated who did what and what they made. Detroit already was geared for civilian production. There is little difference between a military and a civilian truck, however a massive difference between a civilian truck and a tank. So Detroit would supply all the trucks for the USSR while the Soviets concentrated on their own guns and tanks which fitted into their own logistics supply. The U.S. also supplied millions of boots. These Soviet tanks the U.S. military could only drool over. U.S. supplies to the USSR was only around 5%.

As Studebaker only made just under 220,000 of the truck in different tonnages, so two million sent to the USSR is highly unlikely. The truck was reliable for the time having a 5.2 litre flat cylinder head and side valves. But was heavy in fuel consumption. For comparison, the reliable British Bedford had 3 litre engines with overhead valves consuming less fuel.
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Old 01-22-2019, 11:24 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Grandstander View Post
They had pipes installed in the cliffs to pump oil into ocean near the shore, to set alight when the Germans reached the beaches.
And while it was tactically mostly useless, it was used for some clever propaganda.

German POWs with burns were gathered in one hospital and a whisper campaign started that this sudden arrival was the result of a German raid that had gone wrong and been repulsed by the new weapon. This was "picked up" by the BBC broadcasts to occupied Europe. A French-language program would do mock German lessons. "First, let's conjugate the verb: I burn. You burn. He burns. They burn. And now, in a sentence: Look at the Oberleutnant, he burns very well indeed."

Parisian jokers would walk up behind German soldiers and pretend to warm their hands, like one would with a fire.

Small stuff, but - as war efforts go - very cheap and if it could make German troops less enthused about storming the beaches of England, why not?
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Old 01-22-2019, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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Another interesting consideration would have been to poison the waters of the invasion sites - the Germans were master chemists, and it's not out of the range of probability that the right compound could have been found to toxify the shallower waters with a few (hundred?) tons of it.

Geneva Convention and all that, sure.
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Old 01-22-2019, 12:42 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
3,618 posts, read 1,518,428 times
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Default A gas arms race?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Another interesting consideration would have been to poison the waters of the invasion sites - the Germans were master chemists, and it's not out of the range of probability that the right compound could have been found to toxify the shallower waters with a few (hundred?) tons of it.

Geneva Convention and all that, sure.
A nerve toxin of sufficient lethality to kill by skin contact? That would take a lot of chemical agent. & it would have to be boosted @ intervals. German industry was hard-pressed as it was, to keep manufacturing gunpowder, other explosives, gasoline & diesel fuel & etc. & as I recall, neither of the sides used poison gas on the battlefield - there was a real concern that first use would signal a chemical warfare free-for-all.
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Old 01-22-2019, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southwest88 View Post
A nerve toxin of sufficient lethality to kill by skin contact? That would take a lot of chemical agent.
I was thinking more of something disabling/moderately lethal, rather than an attempt to kill the invasion troops before they reached shore.

There are obviously many points against the notion, both practical and in terms of rules of engagement, but it seems perfectly in line with the overall German mentality of the time. I wonder if it was ever considered.
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