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Old 01-19-2019, 07:23 PM
 
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I have three votes.
476: Fall of the Roman Empire leads to the Middle Ages and the rise of the Middle Eastern Empire and Baghdad as the cultural center of the world.

1917: End of Czarist Russia with the Bolshevik Revolution, start of communism with Lenin, End of the Ottoman Empire which had been in power since the siege of Constantinople in 1453, Interception of the Zimmerman Telegram enters the US into World War I.

1989: Death of Ayatollah Khomeni in Iran, Tiannamen Square Protests, Fall of the Eastern Bloc and the Berlin Wall signals the end of the Cold War.
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Old 01-19-2019, 07:42 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA
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1928. First sales of pre sliced bread. Monumental.
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Old 01-20-2019, 02:05 PM
 
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1066 - Battle of Hastings arguably set the course for western civilization from then on.
5 b.c. (estimated) - Birth of Jesus. Even if you are atheist you cannot deny the impact.
1789 - French Revolution....actually I might change that to it's precursor - 1776- American Declaration of Independence.


I wouldn't be so arrogant at to pick any date in the 20th century, not only is it too easy, but man has 5,000 years of recorded history
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Old 01-20-2019, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Caverns measureless to man...
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Hard to pick just one, but 1945 has to be part of the discussion. The end of a global war that involved the entire northern half and a significant part of the southern half of the planet, and a total realignment of the political, military, technological, and economic structure of most of human society - plus the beginning of the nuclear age. It's hard for me to think of a single year in human history when so many things changed so much in just 12 months.
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Old 01-20-2019, 04:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by droc31 View Post
I have three votes.
476: Fall of the Roman Empire leads to the Middle Ages and the rise of the Middle Eastern Empire and Baghdad as the cultural center of the world.
While the collapse of the Roman Empire in the West was indeed very significant, it was a spent force long before and had been mired in a long-term, slow-motion collapse for well over a century before 476. That particular year was no more significant than the date of May 8, 1945. Each merely marked the final twitching of the corpse of a long-terminal political entity.

And 476 doesn't stand out at all in the history of the Middle Wast.

Quote:
Originally Posted by droc31 View Post
1917: End of Czarist Russia with the Bolshevik Revolution, start of communism with Lenin, End of the Ottoman Empire which had been in power since the siege of Constantinople in 1453, Interception of the Zimmerman Telegram enters the US into World War I.
This is a much better one, at least insofar as nascent communism goes. There was nothing inevitable about communism, which was fortunate to find the right person - Lenin - on hand when opportunity (a power vacuum) presented itself. Still, while communism seems to loom large to those of us who are old enough to remember the chill of the Cold War, in the end it soldiered on as a vital entity for barely seven decades. It's remnants are either basketcases (Cuba and North Korea, the latter more a hereditary despotry than anything Marx would recognize) and more stable powers (China, Vietnam) that retain Marx as more of a national icon than any real source of socio-economic guidance.

But the other two? The sick man of Europe head long been on his deathbed, so his final expiration itself wasn't all that significant. And the details of the wrapping up of World War I would reverberate for awhile, but mostly represent trends already in place.

Quote:
Originally Posted by droc31 View Post
1989: Death of Ayatollah Khomeni in Iran, Tiannamen Square Protests, Fall of the Eastern Bloc and the Berlin Wall signals the end of the Cold War.
Khomeni was an extremely minor player in the grand sweep of history. Tianenmen was a very minor event in the grand sweep of history. And the rot in international communism was present and getting more severe long before 1989. It reached its apex sometime around 1960, give or take a few years, then stagnated and began to lurch towards its end. 1989 was surprising and emotional, but in the chronicles of the end of the Soviet bloc it isn't any more significant than the final end (1991) or the fateful choice of Gorbacheve by the Politburo (1985) or even the long rot under Brezhnev.

Truly pivotal years would be ones where an event occurred that took history in a radically different direction. Examples include 1066 (William might've lost and the Anglo-Saxons aristocracy not been replaced wholesale by Norman French, along with the English monarchy gaining thus gaining a major stake in the continent). or 1787 (the Constitutional Convention succeeds in crafting a function and strong central government to replace a weak confederation that never could have taken these United States to eventually become the United States) to 1962 (if the missiles had flown, the USSR would have been obliterated and selected parts of Europe as well, with the United States badly damaged). That last example might be a bit of a cheat, though, as the hinge is on what didn't happen rather than what did happen.
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Old 01-21-2019, 11:33 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
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I don't view any of these political events as particularly significant.

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Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
1928. First sales of pre-sliced bread. Monumental.
Tangible indeed.

Hard to put a date on when humans began long-term planning of planting seeds and harvesting grains, vegetables and fruits, along with animal husbandry, on a relatively large scale.

Also invention of the wheel and other simple machines, the making of roads and boats for water travel, as well as pottery, storage and transportation structures for water, food and building materials, brick-making, and metal working, the transition from bronze to iron then firearms, for example, etc.

Also hard to pick a specific date for the industrial revolution, but we may be able to pinpoint subsets of that monumental development such as the internal combustion engine, electricity, antibiotics, aviation, instantaneous computing and telecommunications.

Seems to me that political events, which individual humans and their power groups, in all their arrogance, specifically record, revolve around these more far-reaching developments whose protagonists in many cases remain nameless.

One could argue that it is the other way around, but it doesn't seem logical to me: history clearly shows that humans repeat foolish behavior time and again regardless of circumstances, leading in some cases to utter disaster for this or that power group, but certain significant developments such as agriculture and industrialization are irreversible, barring some utter catastrophe like an astronomical or human-perpetrated extinction event.

Last edited by bale002; 01-21-2019 at 11:54 AM..
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Old 01-21-2019, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
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July 28th 1914. No WW1 = a vastly different 19th, 20th, 21st century...
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Old 01-21-2019, 01:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. In-Between View Post
Hard to pick just one, but 1945 has to be part of the discussion. The end of a global war that involved the entire northern half and a significant part of the southern half of the planet, and a total realignment of the political, military, technological, and economic structure of most of human society - plus the beginning of the nuclear age. It's hard for me to think of a single year in human history when so many things changed so much in just 12 months.

Yes. The victory of communism that enslaved half of Europe for 50 years, killed 100 millions and gave us communist China (and the economic domination they have today), communist Korea, communist Vietnam (and the war), the Afghan war and the effects of it we see today, Iran (revolution would not have occurred without), communist governments in South America which killed millions and then military governments that came to power in response that did some abuses (Brazil and Argentina would be prosperous economically today without the communist chaos) and of course the capture of Palestine and all the ramifications of creating Israel which has led to turmoil in the Middle East of which we see to this second.

With all this above and Europe literally restricting speech and thoughts being crimes, I rather Germany would have won and prevented a communist world or semi communist world in Western Europe (EU and laws against free speech and right to self defense aka. a means to self defense aka guns).
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Old 01-21-2019, 02:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. In-Between View Post
Hard to pick just one, but 1945 has to be part of the discussion. The end of a global war that involved the entire northern half and a significant part of the southern half of the planet, and a total realignment of the political, military, technological, and economic structure of most of human society - plus the beginning of the nuclear age. It's hard for me to think of a single year in human history when so many things changed so much in just 12 months.


Sounds about right. The drop of the atom bomb was perhaps one of the most important events in human history.
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Old 01-21-2019, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john620 View Post
Yes. The victory of communism that enslaved half of Europe for 50 years, killed 100 millions and gave us communist China (and the economic domination they have today), communist Korea, communist Vietnam (and the war), the Afghan war and the effects of it we see today, Iran (revolution would not have occurred without), communist governments in South America which killed millions and then military governments that came to power in response that did some abuses (Brazil and Argentina would be prosperous economically today without the communist chaos) and of course the capture of Palestine and all the ramifications of creating Israel which has led to turmoil in the Middle East of which we see to this second.

With all this above and Europe literally restricting speech and thoughts being crimes, I rather Germany would have won and prevented a communist world or semi communist world in Western Europe (EU and laws against free speech and right to self defense aka. a means to self defense aka guns).
OK, think about it... No WW1 means Germany would not have worked to release lenin back to Russia. The fall of the Czar would have been prevented or substantially delayed . Czar stays in power means no commies. No German defeat followed by a onerous peace treaty and penalties means no WW2. No WW2 =no nukes or a greatly delayed US nuclear program. Vastly different world we would be living in today....
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