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Old 01-31-2019, 07:35 AM
 
Location: London
3,983 posts, read 3,438,347 times
Reputation: 1719

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
The US Civil War is important in the global context because it ensured that industrialization, of both agriculture and manufacturing, would spread across an entire continent based on mechanized land transport, i.e. railroad and then motor vehicles, in a context of free-market economy and elected government.

This was an unprecedented achievement in human history when in the previous 12,000 years or so almost everything was done painstakingly by hand and, when transported, mainly by sea at great risk and land transport was very, very slow and very expensive (ask the western Romans as they expanded and tried to maintain their rule in what later became central and western Europe) in the context of mostly command economy and brutish military government (ask the Venezuelans).
The US Civil war contributed zero to the spread of mechanise world transport and trade. Railways were already in the Americas well before the civil war. Steamships were already sailing the oceans.
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Old 01-31-2019, 07:47 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
6,274 posts, read 10,348,861 times
Reputation: 5138
Quote:
Originally Posted by John-UK View Post
The US Civil war contributed zero to the spread of mechanise world transport and trade. Railways were already in the Americas well before the civil war. Steamships were already sailing the oceans.
Almost as fun as the airplane joke.
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Old 01-31-2019, 09:54 AM
 
3,545 posts, read 2,254,718 times
Reputation: 2670
Here's my hot take: civilization is overrated. We tend to think of civilizations as bigger cities/more toys = more advanced and better, but that's not necessarily true. There were plenty of nomadic or hunter/gatherer societies that were perfectly happy, and well-adapted to their environment, without cities and industry. European civilization for example developed as a response to the environment in Europe, but it is not necessarily superior in any inherent or objective way (ditto China, Egypt, etc.).

It's easy to get wrapped up in our own viewpoint and forget that success doesn't have to be defined in the context of a relentless march toward the technological singularity.
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Old 01-31-2019, 10:12 AM
 
3,012 posts, read 1,337,107 times
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I wouldnt overrate or underrate any cultures or civilization . Its their beliefs, culture and practices and fully respect that. But I have a problem when its imposed on others or when others are treated with disdain. Power and prosperity doesnt have to make you mean. A man born 5000 years ago and now have the same features.
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Old 01-31-2019, 01:47 PM
 
12,379 posts, read 6,450,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
You do know that the Normans who conquered Britain were Viking stock? Norman is a contraction of Norseman. That area of France had previously been invaded and the Vikings intermarried..
In somewhat more recent history, Iím in Alsace quite a bit. I like the countryside and Alsatian wine. I remember stopping along the Route du Vin at Koenigsgorg Castle. The Swedes occupied it in 1674. Iím also in Turckheim a lot because I like the Zind-Humbrecht wines. There was a famous Battle of Turckheim. Thatís as far south as the Swedes got. Itís 45 miles short of Switzerland. Itís 780 miles to Sweden.
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Old 01-31-2019, 01:53 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
75,050 posts, read 66,699,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankMiller View Post
Arabs did more than preserve. For example, Al-Khwarizmi arguably invented algebra. Indian contributions to math and astronomy are also underappreciated.
It would be great if this were taught in schools.
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Old 01-31-2019, 01:55 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
75,050 posts, read 66,699,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
You do know that the Normans who conquered Britain were Viking stock? Norman is a contraction of Norseman. That area of France had previously been invaded and the Vikings intermarried..
Right. And Swedish Vikings brought law and order to Russia. They initiated a great dynasty.
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Old 01-31-2019, 01:57 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
75,050 posts, read 66,699,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
In somewhat more recent history, Iím in Alsace quite a bit. I like the countryside and Alsatian wine. I remember stopping along the Route du Vin at Koenigsgorg Castle. The Swedes occupied it in 1674. Iím also in Turckheim a lot because I like the Zind-Humbrecht wines. There was a famous Battle of Turckheim. Thatís as far south as the Swedes got. Itís 45 miles short of Switzerland. Itís 780 miles to Sweden.
The Swedes made it all the way to Byzantium, via Russia's rivers.
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Old 01-31-2019, 02:27 PM
 
11,140 posts, read 4,494,720 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John-UK View Post
The Viking longboat was a superbly engineered design. They crossed the Atlantic in them.

Peel Castle in the Isle of Man. We would take part in organised children's games inside. 100% designed and built by Vikings.



Wikipedia
Vikings never really crossed the Atlantic like traveling from Denmark to the mid Atlantic coast. They island hopped from northern Europe to Iceland, to Greenland, to North America....big difference. Some Eskimos did the same thing in reverse.
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Old 01-31-2019, 03:28 PM
 
804 posts, read 482,064 times
Reputation: 753
The Aztecs are a bit underrated in that they're either known for their religious practices or skills at urban planning, but not many know that they also produced a lot of poetry and had schools of thinkers similar to ancient Greece. Unfortunately most of the texts were destroyed by the Spaniards. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aztec_philosophy

The Islamic Golden Age was slightly overrated in that many of accomplishments attributed to them, especially those in mathematics, actually came from India. By the same token medieval Indian was somewhat underrated at least in the West today.

I thought the Mali Empire was also somewhat overrated. Mansa Musa, the "richest man in history", was only rich because of the gold mines in his domain. His empire does not produce a lot of great art or good that other civilizations would want, and is primitive for its time in many ways. For example, the absence of coinage and the lack of widespread literacy outside of Timbuktu.
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