U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-04-2019, 10:52 PM
 
5,809 posts, read 6,027,965 times
Reputation: 2596

Advertisements

Prior to WW2, what were the Intelligence/Spying Services/Covert Operations called?

Britain during WW2 had the SOE, America had the OSS, Germany had the Abwehr. What about the other nation states of Europe? How about the colonial empires, the chinese dynasties, the moslem empires, medievel Europe, Roman Empires, and Greek City States?

Were they just a part of the army? Were the Hashashins the Arabs intel service?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-05-2019, 04:31 PM
 
11,804 posts, read 17,959,621 times
Reputation: 17862
Interesting question - spying/espionage has always been a facet of statecraft, if only involving one diplomat getting another diplomat drunk. My guess is most of the earlier times spying was the above, or military exercises involving recon and report back. During the revolutionary war both American's and British had relatively shophisticated spying networks (as seen in the book and TV show TURN: Washington Spies). In modern times I think they developed into formal civilian (that is, seperate from the military) government organizations. Most are split between internal and external security. The USSR had SMERSH in WW2 (fictionalized drastically in James Bond books and movies), France had the Deuxième Bureau in the 20s and 30s.

France and Great Britain by the way really perfected espionage in the Napoleonic Wars and my guess is that is the point they became this formal part of statecraft. France, as a police state during this period, had one of the best internal spy networks of any country (you couldn't take a crap in France without Napolean knowing about it), and became a model for Soviet and Nazi Germany internal spy networks like the Gestapo, Great Britian perfected international spy networks also during this time - they essentially had to teach the US in the arts of spycraft during WW2.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 03:17 PM
 
5,809 posts, read 6,027,965 times
Reputation: 2596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
Interesting question - spying/espionage has always been a facet of statecraft, if only involving one diplomat getting another diplomat drunk. My guess is most of the earlier times spying was the above, or military exercises involving recon and report back. During the revolutionary war both American's and British had relatively shophisticated spying networks (as seen in the book and TV show TURN: Washington Spies). In modern times I think they developed into formal civilian (that is, seperate from the military) government organizations. Most are split between internal and external security. The USSR had SMERSH in WW2 (fictionalized drastically in James Bond books and movies), France had the Deuxième Bureau in the 20s and 30s.

France and Great Britain by the way really perfected espionage in the Napoleonic Wars and my guess is that is the point they became this formal part of statecraft. France, as a police state during this period, had one of the best internal spy networks of any country (you couldn't take a crap in France without Napolean knowing about it), and became a model for Soviet and Nazi Germany internal spy networks like the Gestapo, Great Britian perfected international spy networks also during this time - they essentially had to teach the US in the arts of spycraft during WW2.
I thought USSR had NKVD/KGB. I thought SMERSH was the James Bond name for the USSR intelligence apparatus. What was GB's called during its colonial/imperialism era? I think during the Civil War, the Union used the Pinkerton Detective Agency. I find that strange, why not have its own?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top