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Old Yesterday, 06:51 PM
 
249 posts, read 48,884 times
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Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
Ive never heard of this or seen it done but says its been replaced.. does anyone remember maybe doing this at school... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bellamy_salute The Bellamy salute was first demonstrated on October 12, 1892 according to Bellamy's published instructions for the "National School Celebration of Columbus Day": before I get accused of pot stirring again.........this salute had nothing at all to do with the NAZI salute.. and I found it interesting..
And yet it's really no surprise that, due to the fact that it would inevitably remind people of the Nazi salute, it rapidly fell out of fashion with the rise of the Third Reich. Think of all the things that evoked Germany that quickly became taboo in the periods of both World Wars.

Why is Kitchener, Ontario, named after a British Field Marshal? Because the city simply could not abide its longtime name of Berlin after the outbreak of World War I, and it was changed. Many other cities with German names were rechristened, especially in the United States and Australia. Symphonies quit performing works by German composers. Frankfurters became 'hot dogs' and sauerkraut became 'liberty cabbage' - many decades before the 'freedom fries' idiocy of 2003. King George V tossed his German name. It was World War I which mostly extinguished a vibrant domestic German language in the United, with schools ceasing to teach the language (an estimated 25% of students in the U.S. studied German before the war - it fell to about 1% post-war) and newspapers in German shutting down. And, of course, the swastika, an ancient symbol used in such varied places as Finland and Native American cultures, fell far out of favor. It was periodically incorporated in architecture before the 1930s - but almost never after that decade.

There is a deep strain of political correctness in nationalism. That's not a criticism, simply an observation. Anything that reminded people of Germany was immediately suspect during the Nazi era, and great efforts were made to avoid any possible association with the Third Reich.
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Old Today, 02:27 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
14,987 posts, read 12,069,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2x3x29x41 View Post
And yet it's really no surprise that, due to the fact that it would inevitably remind people of the Nazi salute, it rapidly fell out of fashion with the rise of the Third Reich. Think of all the things that evoked Germany that quickly became taboo in the periods of both World Wars.

Why is Kitchener, Ontario, named after a British Field Marshal? Because the city simply could not abide its longtime name of Berlin after the outbreak of World War I, and it was changed. Many other cities with German names were rechristened, especially in the United States and Australia. Symphonies quit performing works by German composers. Frankfurters became 'hot dogs' and sauerkraut became 'liberty cabbage' - many decades before the 'freedom fries' idiocy of 2003. King George V tossed his German name. It was World War I which mostly extinguished a vibrant domestic German language in the United, with schools ceasing to teach the language (an estimated 25% of students in the U.S. studied German before the war - it fell to about 1% post-war) and newspapers in German shutting down. And, of course, the swastika, an ancient symbol used in such varied places as Finland and Native American cultures, fell far out of favor. It was periodically incorporated in architecture before the 1930s - but almost never after that decade.

There is a deep strain of political correctness in nationalism. That's not a criticism, simply an observation. Anything that reminded people of Germany was immediately suspect during the Nazi era, and great efforts were made to avoid any possible association with the Third Reich.
Yes this is true... seems our Empire Biscuits were known as German biscuits at one time.
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