U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-05-2019, 04:20 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
14,992 posts, read 12,074,211 times
Reputation: 21578

Advertisements

Ive never heard of this or seen it done but says its been replaced.. does anyone remember maybe doing this at school... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bellamy_salute The Bellamy salute was first demonstrated on October 12, 1892 according to Bellamy's published instructions for the "National School Celebration of Columbus Day": before I get accused of pot stirring again.........this salute had nothing at all to do with the NAZI salute.. and I found it interesting..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-05-2019, 08:10 AM
 
11,720 posts, read 17,191,650 times
Reputation: 5867
Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
Ive never heard of this or seen it done but says its been replaced.. does anyone remember maybe doing this at school... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bellamy_salute The Bellamy salute was first demonstrated on October 12, 1892 according to Bellamy's published instructions for the "National School Celebration of Columbus Day": before I get accused of pot stirring again.........this salute had nothing at all to do with the NAZI salute.. and I found it interesting..

I have a book that is composed of pictures of the Bronx, New York from about 1920 to 1950.

There is one of some school students doing the Bellamy salute, probably around 1925 or so. As this was pre-Hitler, it clearly has nothing to do with that. Obviously, the arrival Hitlers put a stop to it. So much so, that most people do not know about it today.

The Romans made it famous but who knows how many others were using it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2019, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
14,992 posts, read 12,074,211 times
Reputation: 21578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
I have a book that is composed of pictures of the Bronx, New York from about 1920 to 1950.

There is one of some school students doing the Bellamy salute, probably around 1925 or so. As this was pre-Hitler, it clearly has nothing to do with that. Obviously, the arrival Hitlers put a stop to it. So much so, that most people do not know about it today.

The Romans made it famous but who knows how many others were using it?
thanks Moth... it was new to me... love finding out wee things like this about the past..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2019, 08:47 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
5,746 posts, read 4,378,315 times
Reputation: 7039
In the 1960s when I started going to public school I remember placing my hand over my heart and saying the Pledge of Allegiance, then singing My Country Tis of Thee to start every morning. Each kid then had to say his name so the teacher would know if anyone ditched school. The teacher kept his own name (R. Sole) on the blackboard all year. I chuckled every time I looked at it. Catholic school was completely different, there was no Pledge of Allegiance or singing My Country Tis of Thee. We had to say prayers to start the day, which I thought was strange since I had said them before I went to bed the night before. They couldn't have worn off that fast.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2019, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
14,992 posts, read 12,074,211 times
Reputation: 21578
Quote:
Originally Posted by aliasfinn View Post
In the 1960s when I started going to public school I remember placing my hand over my heart and saying the Pledge of Allegiance, then singing My Country Tis of Thee to start every morning. Each kid then had to say his name so the teacher would know if anyone ditched school. The teacher kept his own name (R. Sole) on the blackboard all year. I chuckled every time I looked at it. Catholic school was completely different, there was no Pledge of Allegiance or singing My Country Tis of Thee. We had to say prayers to start the day, which I thought was strange since I had said them before I went to bed the night before. They couldn't have worn off that fast.
hahahahahah love it..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2019, 09:49 AM
 
11,720 posts, read 17,191,650 times
Reputation: 5867
Quote:
Originally Posted by aliasfinn View Post
In the 1960s when I started going to public school I remember placing my hand over my heart and saying the Pledge of Allegiance, then singing My Country Tis of Thee to start every morning. Each kid then had to say his name so the teacher would know if anyone ditched school. The teacher kept his own name (R. Sole) on the blackboard all year. I chuckled every time I looked at it. Catholic school was completely different, there was no Pledge of Allegiance or singing My Country Tis of Thee. We had to say prayers to start the day, which I thought was strange since I had said them before I went to bed the night before. They couldn't have worn off that fast.
We used to sing My Country Tis of Thee as well in DC public school.

I was shocked when I later realized it was God Save the Queen with different lyrics. I felt soiled. Like a traitor!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2019, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
14,992 posts, read 12,074,211 times
Reputation: 21578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
We used to sing My Country Tis of Thee as well in DC public school.

I was shocked when I later realized it was God Save the Queen with different lyrics. I felt soiled. Like a traitor!
hahahahaha some of these answers.. brilliant.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2019, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
17,342 posts, read 52,770,442 times
Reputation: 28854
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
I have a book that is composed of pictures of the Bronx, New York from about 1920 to 1950.

There is one of some school students doing the Bellamy salute, probably around 1925 or so. As this was pre-Hitler, it clearly has nothing to do with that. Obviously, the arrival Hitlers put a stop to it. So much so, that most people do not know about it today.

The Romans made it famous but who knows how many others were using it?
As this is the history forum, scholars suggest that the Romans didn't make that salute, much less make it famous. That came later: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_salute

A lot of people saw it in Hollywood movies like "Ben Hur" or "Cleopatra" and assumed it was correct, just like the thumbs-up and thumbs-down gestures:
https://www.thevintagenews.com/2016/...at-many-think/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2019, 11:12 AM
 
11,720 posts, read 17,191,650 times
Reputation: 5867
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
As this is the history forum, scholars suggest that the Romans didn't make that salute, much less make it famous. That came later: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_salute

A lot of people saw it in Hollywood movies like "Ben Hur" or "Cleopatra" and assumed it was correct, just like the thumbs-up and thumbs-down gestures:
https://www.thevintagenews.com/2016/...at-many-think/
We studied Roman history in 9th grade ancient history. The old bat never said who originated it. But she described it as a three step process:
  1. Right fist clenched and banged against chest.
  2. With fist still clenched, arm extended outward at 45 degree angle.
  3. Then fist becomes unclenched as arm remains extended and hand straightens out thus becoming part of 45 degree angle.

Impressive piece of pageantry. Small wonder its appeal persisted and in many circles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2019, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
14,992 posts, read 12,074,211 times
Reputation: 21578
Another salute I didnt know about the Zogist salute... The distinctive gesture was instituted as a salute by Zog I of Albania. It was first widely used by Zog's personal police force and was later adopted by the Royal Albanian Army.[1]

Leo Freundlich, when confronted by the Nazi greeting "Heil Hitler", would sarcastically respond with a "Heil Zogu" salute. The confusion which this created among German diplomats, who believed it to be a standard Albanian greeting, greatly amused him.
A similar salute is also used in India by the organization Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh. This salute is called Sangh pranaam. It is also the normal way of taking the Indian pledge. In Latin America, especially in Mexico, a gesture similar to the Zogist salute is used by civilians to salute the Mexican flag during the national anthem. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zogist_salute

As IM not a football supporter in Glasgow I also knew nothing about this salute at some football games.
The Red Hand of Ulster Salute is a modified version of the Roman Salute in which the hand is raised vertically to symbolise the Red Hand of Ulster. It is used by some Rangers F.C. fans to show an affinity with the Loyalist cause. Its similarity to the Nazi salute has caused offence and the football club and its supporters' association have asked fans not to use it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top