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Old 03-08-2019, 12:32 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA
4,338 posts, read 3,160,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffdoorgunner View Post
as to the targets we fired at..... in 1970 we did both stationary known distances, and Pop up targets.
I'm not going to say what exactly took place in Ww2 as to individual squad tactics or who fired what. I wasn't there. I would guess that just about every situation was different in some way.
In 1966 going thru Marine Corps boot camp we did the stationary variable distance firing for qualification. Even our DI’s admitted in real combat there was hardly any opportunities where you might target a a specific individual standing still like a target. Most of the time you were just firing toward foliage, tree lines or buildings where you thought there was incoming fire.
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Old 03-08-2019, 02:43 PM
 
4,817 posts, read 2,079,821 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
In 1966 going thru Marine Corps boot camp we did the stationary variable distance firing for qualification. Even our DI’s admitted in real combat there was hardly any opportunities where you might target a a specific individual standing still like a target. Most of the time you were just firing toward foliage, tree lines or buildings where you thought there was incoming fire.
True that.. especially from a helicopter...……….The two times I actually saw a guy in a free fire zone... I did not shoot.. he was unarmed...……..and running for cover...…..
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Old 03-08-2019, 03:02 PM
 
2,872 posts, read 2,930,784 times
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Audie Murphy was at my basic training graduation at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. in 1960 in full uniform.
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Old 03-08-2019, 07:35 PM
 
31,350 posts, read 16,047,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
In 1966 going thru Marine Corps boot camp we did the stationary variable distance firing for qualification. Even our DI’s admitted in real combat there was hardly any opportunities where you might target a a specific individual standing still like a target. Most of the time you were just firing toward foliage, tree lines or buildings where you thought there was incoming fire.
On the flip side of that, I'll recommend George MacDonald Fraser's excellent wartime memoir "Quartered safe out here." (They were fighting the Japanese in Burma and they were definitely not safe.) He describes the ending of the battle of Pyawbwe - the Japanese have been routed and are in disordered retreat, and the British have taken firing positions and have time to pick targets.

Quote:
Such [humane] considerations don't arise when the human target appears in the V of the backsight. You're just thankful for the chance and concentrate on keeping the aim steady... Nick was pausing between shots to observe :"You're firin' low an' left, Jock - that's it!" And then suddenly pointing, as he reloaded, to a fallen figure and shouting: "Git that booger - he's nobbut wounded!"
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Old 03-08-2019, 08:00 PM
 
5,065 posts, read 4,890,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffdoorgunner View Post
No doubt about it. Hero applies to this man. After 3 years of brutal combat what person would NOT be affected. If you are interested here are two book recommendations...……...I have read the first "no name on the bullet"

https://www.amazon.com/No-Name-Bulle.../dp/0140134468

I was surprised at just how good his Western movie, "No Name on the Bullet" really was. Murphy plays a gunfighter who people are in awe of because he's reputed to have killed 28 men. Interesting to think that in real life Murphy had actually killed almost ten times that amount.
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Old 03-09-2019, 09:46 AM
 
1,046 posts, read 1,924,057 times
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I never cared for Murphy in westerns because he didn't have the look of a cowboy or wild west type. As an actor he was mediocre at best.
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Old 03-09-2019, 10:24 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Angorlee View Post
I never cared for Murphy in westerns because he didn't have the look of a cowboy or wild west type. As an actor he was mediocre at best.
I agree with you there...…….
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Old 03-09-2019, 12:39 PM
 
1,372 posts, read 2,108,559 times
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Audie Murphy's wife, Pam, was a real sweetheart. She worked at the Sepulveda, CA, VA, where she checked on every veteran. She would make sure that you knew where to go, and if you were seated she would ask how long you had been waiting. She made sure that "her" veterans were taken care of.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/...pal_lee-murphy
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Old 03-09-2019, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,100 posts, read 12,115,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffdoorgunner View Post
I agree with you there...…….
Audie admitted himself that he was no actor.. but didnt he play the real game better than anyone else... a superhero...
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Old Yesterday, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale
999 posts, read 481,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
Audie admitted himself that he was no actor.. but didnt he play the real game better than anyone else... a superhero...
Audie was ahead of his time in showing compassion towards Apache Indians in one of his early films during that era of segregation and blatant white supremacy in the typical Western film of the 1940s-1960s. I am very surprised he had done that. RIP Audie. A lot of Native Americans who served in WWII would have appreciated that.
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