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Old 03-06-2019, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,025 posts, read 12,088,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
I have never read the book. Nor have I studied the subject at all. Years ago, a fella who had told me that Bligh was quite typical of British ship captains at that time. His conduct was not unusual.

No idea.
I read the same thing.... that he was a fair but strict on discipline as they had to be on ships..... and think most of the men saw how easy life was on this island and wanted more... I dont think it was to do with Bligh at all..
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Old 03-06-2019, 11:27 AM
 
11,731 posts, read 17,199,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
I read the same thing.... that he was a fair but strict on discipline as they had to be on ships..... and think most of the men saw how easy life was on this island and wanted more... I dont think it was to do with Bligh at all..
If the movie in question was even 1/2 accurate, I cannot blame those chaps for wanting to stay there.
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Old 03-06-2019, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Proxima Centauri
4,319 posts, read 1,803,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
So I watched the movie and then read the true story, but there is something I do not understand. How was Lt. Bligh, able to reach England, all the way from French Polynesia when all he had was a lifeboat, and not enough food?

It just doesn't seem possible to go all the way there, or at least it's not really explained. Even when I read the true story, all it says was that he reached England. But how?

I've recently seen the Anthony Hopkins / Mel Gibson version of the Bounty and the Trevor Howard / Marlon Brando version and they reached New Holland in both versions. New Holland was Australia and all of the Dutch islands North of Australia. It was most likely that he found passage on a Dutch ship or an English ship that was going back to Europe.

One might think that Pitcairn was East of Polynesia, but I was surprised to see that it is more South than East.
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Old 03-06-2019, 12:44 PM
 
11,731 posts, read 17,199,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonyafd View Post
I've recently seen the Anthony Hopkins / Mel Gibson version of the Bounty and the Trevor Howard / Marlon Brando version and they reached New Holland in both versions. New Holland was Australia and all of the Dutch islands North of Australia. It was most likely that he found passage on a Dutch ship or an English ship that was going back to Europe.

One might think that Pitcairn was East of Polynesia, but I was surprised to see that it is more South than East.
And his descendants are still there on Pitcairn.
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Old 03-06-2019, 05:28 PM
 
31,291 posts, read 16,020,306 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
I read the same thing.... that he was a fair but strict on discipline as they had to be on ships..... and think most of the men saw how easy life was on this island and wanted more... I dont think it was to do with Bligh at all..
Discipline in the Royal Navy was extremely strict, yet Bligh's approach to physical discipline as, if anything, lax for his time. He was, however, by all accounts a difficult person to get along with and he would be on Fletcher's case in particular. 44 people on a 90-foot ship requires some people skillls, but even so it's worth noting that only 18 men joined Fletcher in the mutiny.

There's no doubt that Bligh was a master mariner and navigator, and smart seamen generally realize that they stand a better chance of getting home in one whole piece if the boss knows his job. Bligh wasn't just cleared at his court-martial, he was much cherished in England when he returned - received an accelerated promotion to post-captain, among other things.

And dropping anchor at Pitcairn is a bucket list item.
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Old 03-07-2019, 03:04 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,025 posts, read 12,088,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dane_in_LA View Post
Discipline in the Royal Navy was extremely strict, yet Bligh's approach to physical discipline as, if anything, lax for his time. He was, however, by all accounts a difficult person to get along with and he would be on Fletcher's case in particular. 44 people on a 90-foot ship requires some people skillls, but even so it's worth noting that only 18 men joined Fletcher in the mutiny.

There's no doubt that Bligh was a master mariner and navigator, and smart seamen generally realize that they stand a better chance of getting home in one whole piece if the boss knows his job. Bligh wasn't just cleared at his court-martial, he was much cherished in England when he returned - received an accelerated promotion to post-captain, among other things.

And dropping anchor at Pitcairn is a bucket list item.
I had thought the Royal Navy too Dane but read it was in fact the Merchant Navy but the site may be wrong with info..
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Old 03-07-2019, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
17,201 posts, read 10,570,886 times
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This might shed a little light on the subject:


Captain Bligh and 18 men were cast adrift in the South Pacific Ocean in a 23 foot boat.

Bligh then proceeded to make one of the most heroic voyages in history. First they made to the nearby island of Tofoa. The natives were hostile and they were lucky to get away with only the loss of John Norton, who was a hero in allowing the boat to escape. Then there were eighteen men with enough food and water for five days. Bligh made the decision to sail to Kupang and to reapportion the food to serve for 50 days. They eventually made the heroic voyage in 48 days, landing in Timor on June 12, 1789. No one died on the voyage, however three men died in Batavia. Bligh’s Clerk, John Samuel, saved the Log and Bligh’s journals and Bligh was grateful to him for his loyal actions.

Bligh arrived back in England in March the following year.
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Old 03-07-2019, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,025 posts, read 12,088,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
If the movie in question was even 1/2 accurate, I cannot blame those chaps for wanting to stay there.
very true ..haha sun sand and sex..and seems when they went to Pitcairn they took men from the island as slaves..
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Old 03-07-2019, 06:48 AM
 
11,731 posts, read 17,199,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dane_in_LA View Post
Discipline in the Royal Navy was extremely strict, yet Bligh's approach to physical discipline as, if anything, lax for his time. He was, however, by all accounts a difficult person to get along with and he would be on Fletcher's case in particular. 44 people on a 90-foot ship requires some people skillls, but even so it's worth noting that only 18 men joined Fletcher in the mutiny.

There's no doubt that Bligh was a master mariner and navigator, and smart seamen generally realize that they stand a better chance of getting home in one whole piece if the boss knows his job. Bligh wasn't just cleared at his court-martial, he was much cherished in England when he returned - received an accelerated promotion to post-captain, among other things.

And dropping anchor at Pitcairn is a bucket list item.
I saw a GlobeTrekker episode on Pitcairn. Interesting place and snorkeling to see what is left of the Bounty would be cool. But it looks like 2 maybe 3 days is all you need.
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Old 03-07-2019, 09:53 AM
 
31,291 posts, read 16,020,306 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
I had thought the Royal Navy too Dane but read it was in fact the Merchant Navy but the site may be wrong with info..
Bounty started her life as a merchantman (a collier), then bought, refit and renamed by the Royal Navy for the breadfruit expedition. Under Bligh, she was a Royal Navy ship sailing under navy regulations, although of course not considered a man-o-war.

(Figuring out how to classify vessels in the RN in the 18th and 19th century can drive a man to drinking. "Oh, yes, she's a ship as per her rigging, but as she's commanded by a lieutenant, she's a sloop.")

It was a very sad day when the modern replica of Bounty went down in hurricane Sandy, with the loss of two crew.
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