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Old 03-10-2019, 05:07 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
10,244 posts, read 3,502,748 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
wow no I didnt know that but seems they were everywhere in hositality at that time, wonder why................

German migrants were to be found in significant numbers in the British hospitality industry
during the period 1880 to 1920. They worked as waiters, chefs, and managers of restaurants
and hotels. This article has three main sections. It begins with a brief outline of the rise of
restaurants and hotels in late nineteenth-century Britain and the role of migrants in this
process. It then analyses the Germans in the British hospitality industry in the decades
leading up to the First World War. The article then focuses upon the rise of hostility towards
Germans with the approach of the Great War, which led to dismissal, internment and
repatriation during the conflict..


In terms of the telephone, the first autmatic telephone exchange opened in the UK in 1912, and was revolutionary because you could now call direct rather than go thropugh an operator.

In terms of electricity, the establishment of a national grid by Scotsman Lord Weir was a major breakthrough.

However it should not be forgotten that UK Cities were lit up by gas lights prior to electricity, indeed there are still gas lights still in existence in parts of London, along with lamp lighters.


Last edited by Brave New World; 03-10-2019 at 05:27 AM..
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Old 03-10-2019, 06:02 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,116 posts, read 12,120,733 times
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One firm which has been in Bridgeton Glasgow for almost a century is Anderson Tunnelling in Broad St, a division of the Anderson Group, formerly Anderson Strathclyde. It was founded in 1881 and specialised in electrical engineering, inaugurating the first public electricity supply in the country for Glasgow Corporation. Premises were opened in Orr St in 1892, where the old Olympia Cinema now stands, before the entire operation moved to the Broad St factory in 1897. At that time the company was known as Mavor & Coulson Ltd. Its work extended abroad and included the wiring and lighting of the world's largest woollen mill near St Petersburg. It was also one of the first British companies to resume trading with Russia after the 1917 Revolution - not a popular decision to make at that time! Mavor & Coulson also pioneered coal-cutting machinery and were innovators in the field of mine-working equipment. It is in this latter line of work, with various diversifications, that Anderson Tunnelling have continued to excel.
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Old 03-10-2019, 07:10 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Where my mom grew up in rural Kentucky electric lines didn't come until the late 1950s.
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Old 03-10-2019, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
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My paternal Grandfather - seated in the center - (b. 1889 - d. 1960) was the owner/operator of the Graham, Missouri Telephone Exchange from 1912 until 1920, after which he opened a large automobile/tractor repair garage in that rural community. The telephone system was battery powered with each home wall phone containing its own battery and was hand-cranked. I still have two of those cumbersome telephones. Grandpa had a gasoline powered generator to charge up everyone's battery (if they brought them in to his office). He was originally trained by my GGrandfather to be a blacksmith.
The town was not electrified until 1940, and did not have a water & sewage system until 1965.


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Old 03-10-2019, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,116 posts, read 12,120,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoPro View Post
My paternal Grandfather - seated in the center - (b. 1889 - d. 1960) was the owner/operator of the Graham, Missouri Telephone Exchange from 1912 until 1920, after which he opened a large automobile/tractor repair garage in that rural community. The telephone system was battery powered with each home wall phone containing its own battery and was hand-cranked. I still have two of those cumbersome telephones. Grandpa had a gasoline powered generator to charge up everyone's battery (if they brought them in to his office). He was originally trained by my GGrandfather to be a blacksmith.
The town was not electrified until 1940, and did not have a water & sewage system until 1965.

Love this thanks for posting it..
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Old 03-10-2019, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Follow the oil exhaust cloud until you run out of gas, then turn left
1,058 posts, read 320,874 times
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Most North American wireline COs and mobile stations (cell phone towers) today do still contain racks of batteries since most state utility commissions have service tariffs legally requiring telcos to maintain standby battery power and a gas or diesel generator so they can provide service during a power failure. (Ever wondered why the phone always works during a power outage? That's why.) In normal usage they are powered off standard utility mains converted to the -48 VDC idle/-6 VDC active used in the telephone network, plus generators to provide the 90 VAC 20 Hz ringing voltage.

Quote:
In terms of the telephone, the first autmatic telephone exchange opened in the UK in 1912, and was revolutionary because you could now call direct rather than go thropugh an operator.
Actually, assuming you're talking about automatic switching worldwide (not specifically in the UK) we have you beat by about 20 years. Mr Strowger, an undertaker, put his first step-by-step office into service in 1892 resulting from a conflict of interest involving a competing undertaker's wife being the local cordboard operator. Strowger's company was the forerunner of Automatic Electric, which became GTE's equivalent of AT$T's Western Electric after they soaked up the company in the early 50s.

Last edited by Ttark; 03-10-2019 at 12:55 PM..
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Old 03-10-2019, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
4,614 posts, read 1,799,148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Where my mom grew up in rural Kentucky electric lines didn't come until the late 1950s.
Wow, did they have telephone lines before that?
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Old 03-10-2019, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoPro View Post
My paternal Grandfather - seated in the center - (b. 1889 - d. 1960) was the owner/operator of the Graham, Missouri Telephone Exchange from 1912 until 1920, after which he opened a large automobile/tractor repair garage in that rural community. The telephone system was battery powered with each home wall phone containing its own battery and was hand-cranked. I still have two of those cumbersome telephones. Grandpa had a gasoline powered generator to charge up everyone's battery (if they brought them in to his office). He was originally trained by my GGrandfather to be a blacksmith.
The town was not electrified until 1940, and did not have a water & sewage system until 1965.
Cool picture. Thanks for the picture. I imagine that is about the same type of equipment that my great-grandfather, used for his for his exchange.
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Old 03-10-2019, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
4,614 posts, read 1,799,148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ttark View Post
Most North American wireline COs and mobile stations (cell phone towers) today do still contain racks of batteries since most state utility commissions have service tariffs legally requiring telcos to maintain standby battery power and a gas or diesel generator so they can provide service during a power failure. (Ever wondered why the phone always works during a power outage? That's why.) In normal usage they are powered off standard utility mains converted to the -48 VDC idle/-6 VDC active used in the telephone network, plus generators to provide the 90 VAC 20 Hz ringing voltage.



Actually, assuming you're talking about automatic switching worldwide (not specifically in the UK) we have you beat by about 20 years. Mr Strowger, an undertaker, put his first step-by-step office into service in 1892 resulting from a conflict of interest involving a competing undertaker's wife being the local cordboard operator. Strowger's company was the forerunner of Automatic Electric, which became GTE's equivalent of AT$T's Western Electric after they soaked up the company in the early 50s.
Yep, the first was La Porte, Indiana in 1892. But I don't think automated technology took off until after Bell Telephone started marketing rotary dial phones in 1919. Even then the transition took over 50 years to complete.
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Old Today, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Follow the oil exhaust cloud until you run out of gas, then turn left
1,058 posts, read 320,874 times
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Yes, automatic switching in the Bell System existed, in some form or another (i.e. the ill-fated panel switch) as far back as the mid 1910s. It didn't start to become widespread or even common until after World War II. Even then there were still a lot of areas that insisted on manual or semi-manual service until standardization hit in the late 1960s/early 1970s. Once Mr Strowger's/AE's patents on step-by-step switching expired in the late 1930s they were able to finally put the big, clunky and hard to maintain panel system out to pasture and concentrate on making their own step and crossbar systems, the former of which really helped popularize dial service and to push the tech out the door.
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