U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Yesterday, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
5,378 posts, read 3,422,373 times
Reputation: 15857

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clarallel View Post
I'm not sure I understand you. Are you saying that we should have equal reverence for the perpetrators of the injustice as for the victims?
I'm saying we should have reverence for history. I'm also saying that there are aspects of the Confederacy that fall under "tradition" or "way of life" for many people, and do not these people deserve to have their history memorialized? I'm not saying that everything they stood for is worthy of honor -- far from it -- but I also don't believe in totally suppressing it because some aspects of it were less than exemplary.

To be honest, from what I've read, Emmett Till really didn't do anything that was particularly worthy of honor. In fact, he came across to me as rather crass: a 14-year-old boy supposedly bragging about his sexual conquests. Did he deserve to die? No, absolutely not. But did he deserve statues in his honor? No, not really. But the reason that he is worthy of memorializing is not because of the person himself, but rather what his death represented: the very worst of a racist, oppressive system.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Yesterday, 08:45 AM
 
8,781 posts, read 3,408,476 times
Reputation: 22197
Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
I'm saying we should have reverence for history. I'm also saying that there are aspects of the Confederacy that fall under "tradition" or "way of life" for many people, and do not these people deserve to have their history memorialized? I'm not saying that everything they stood for is worthy of honor -- far from it -- but I also don't believe in totally suppressing it because some aspects of it were less than exemplary.

To be honest, from what I've read, Emmett Till really didn't do anything that was particularly worthy of honor. In fact, he came across to me as rather crass: a 14-year-old boy supposedly bragging about his sexual conquests. Did he deserve to die? No, absolutely not. But did he deserve statues in his honor? No, not really. But the reason that he is worthy of memorializing is not because of the person himself, but rather what his death represented: the very worst of a racist, oppressive system.
I disagree with your details on what Emmitt Till was guilty of, which is basically being black around a woman who wanted her husband's attention and knew accusing a black (child, as it were) of sexual attention would catch her husband's eye.

And the bolded. That's worth remembering, just as we remember Auschwitz. As a reminder.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
23,731 posts, read 4,890,993 times
Reputation: 27725
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
I disagree with your details on what Emmitt Till was guilty of, which is basically being black around a woman who wanted her husband's attention and knew accusing a black (child, as it were) of sexual attention would catch her husband's eye.

And the bolded. That's worth remembering, just as we remember Auschwitz. As a reminder.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:06 AM
 
19,127 posts, read 10,587,186 times
Reputation: 19088
Speaking as an old black man:

I'm old enough that the death of Emmett Till had a direct effect on how my parents taught me to behave around white people, particularly to keep in mind that any given white person could become instantly deadly without consequence.

That said, I don't think either Emmett Till nor Confederate rebels deserve monuments.

I'm not sure how the tragedy should be commemorated. His death was not a terribly unusual thing of the times. What made it unusual is that his mother refused to let it be another of the nation's dirty secrets.

But I don't think it should be commemorated by a monument.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:18 AM
 
11,751 posts, read 17,211,964 times
Reputation: 5884
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
Speaking as an old black man:

I'm old enough that the death of Emmett Till had a direct effect on how my parents taught me to behave around white people, particularly to keep in mind that any given white person could become instantly deadly without consequence.

That said, I don't think either Emmett Till nor Confederate rebels deserve monuments.

I'm not sure how the tragedy should be commemorated. His death was not a terribly unusual thing of the times. What made it unusual is that his mother refused to let it be another of the nation's dirty secrets.

But I don't think it should be commemorated by a monument.

His coffin is on display at the new Museum of African American History.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:40 AM
 
Location: *
7,264 posts, read 2,189,433 times
Reputation: 1977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
Speaking as an old black man:

I'm old enough that the death of Emmett Till had a direct effect on how my parents taught me to behave around white people, particularly to keep in mind that any given white person could become instantly deadly without consequence.

That said, I don't think either Emmett Till nor Confederate rebels deserve monuments.

I'm not sure how the tragedy should be commemorated. His death was not a terribly unusual thing of the times.. What made it unusual is that his mother refused to let it be another of the nation's dirty secrets.

But I don't think it should be commemorated by a monument.
The bold is the part of history that was & still is being suppressed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:06 AM
 
11,751 posts, read 17,211,964 times
Reputation: 5884
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiGeekGuest View Post
The bold is the part of history that was & still is being suppressed.
How?

I recall studying Emmett Till and similar in my 3rd grade class. That was 1973.

There is a plethora of materials and sources available to study this subject.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:35 AM
 
19,127 posts, read 10,587,186 times
Reputation: 19088
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
His coffin is on display at the new Museum of African American History.
I have some problems with the concept of the Museum of African American History.

I haven't visited that museum--I'm sure I would be emotionally overwhelmed by it.

But my feeling at the moment is that African-American history should not have been entirely removed from the Museum of American History.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:43 AM
 
8,781 posts, read 3,408,476 times
Reputation: 22197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
I have some problems with the concept of the Museum of African American History.

I haven't visited that museum--I'm sure I would be emotionally overwhelmed by it.

But my feeling at the moment is that African-American history should not have been entirely removed from the Museum of American History.
Sometimes you have to have museums that focus on specific things. Like, you can have a museum of 20th century pop culture, a president's museum, Ellis Island museum. So that you can take a more indepth look at a particular subject.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 12:07 PM
 
11,751 posts, read 17,211,964 times
Reputation: 5884
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
I have some problems with the concept of the Museum of African American History.

I haven't visited that museum--I'm sure I would be emotionally overwhelmed by it.

But my feeling at the moment is that African-American history should not have been entirely removed from the Museum of American History.
I think that a legitimate stance and you could apply that to Black History month as well.

But the Black experience in America is a special one.

I have not visited it yet but will once the crowds die down, if ever.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top