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Old Yesterday, 05:51 PM
 
10,538 posts, read 15,593,251 times
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Take them to Pawn Stars. You never know.
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Old Yesterday, 09:13 PM
 
500 posts, read 208,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDM66 View Post
Behind the wall was about 9 cases of 85-year-old bourbon that was left over from Prohibition. It must be as smooth as water by now and worth a small fortune.

Well, I'm no expert on alcohol, but I have heard that:
Prohibition whiskey was often highly adulterated and dangerous to drink.
Bourbon will evaporate through a cork. In one example, only half an unopened bottle was left after thirty years.
Whiskey does not age in the bottle. On the other hand, it does not go sour like wine.
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Old Yesterday, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
5,538 posts, read 9,940,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Boring View Post
I noticed in the bottom left of the Indy newspaper a little blurb called "Jim Crow Says". Is this a coincidence with Jim Crow treatment of black Americans?
Good observation. Here's something I found:

"Beginning in 1904 an interesting feature of Indianapolis Star front page weather reports for decades was the associated editorial cartoon featuring the character Jim Crow"

Jim Crow Indianapolis Star 1
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Old Today, 08:13 AM
 
348 posts, read 59,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maf763 View Post
Good observation. Here's something I found:

"Beginning in 1904 an interesting feature of Indianapolis Star front page weather reports for decades was the associated editorial cartoon featuring the character Jim Crow"

Jim Crow Indianapolis Star 1

Wow, that was interesting. Thanks for putting that up.

Does this mean Jim Crow was NOT a coincidence and the Star was deliberately insensitive?

"The fact of that the Indianapolis Star took up such a fictional character as its mascot is less an indictment of that specific publication than a commentary on the pervasive insensitivity of white Americans throughout much of the country's history"
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Old Today, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
5,672 posts, read 3,645,631 times
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This leads me to a question. Suppose you happen to have old newspapers of prominent historical events. And suppose you don't really want to hang on to them. What should you do with them? Is there someplace that would buy them from you? Should you donate them to a historical society? List them on eBay? Put them out with the recycling?
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Old Today, 09:14 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,648 posts, read 70,531,500 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nicet4 View Post
My mother in law died a little over a year ago and we're just now getting ready to sell the house and we're in the process of moving everything out.

Goodwill gets a bunch and all children and grandchildren take what they want.

I happened upon a stack of half a dozen newspapers, the full newspaper and not just the front page, and here is one example:

https://i.imgur.com/z6awBpk.jpg

This almost got tossed out with the junk!

The Indianapolis Star special edition celebrating VJ Day and the end of the war in the pacific with the *** surrender.

I also have the Indianapolis Star celebrating our victory in Europe over the Nazi's.

Also about four papers covering the Kennedy assassination.

Not a huge collection, about ten papers in all, but the important stuff.

I am going to get newspaper frames and hang them on the walls of my home office.

Why did she keep these? Nobody knows for sure but her future husband was serving in the Pacific at the time.
Shocking that the newspapers used the word "Nip" in those days. I guess they weren't all that keen on professionalism. I suppose they rationalized it as being used for brevity.

I was dismayed to learn, long after the fact, of what was thrown away when my grandparents were moved out of their home to something like an assisted living community. My grandmother had a collection of family photos that went back a generation or two, that documented historical figures who had married into the family. She meticulously wrote everyone's name on the back of the photos. Some years ago, when I was asked to do her lineage's genealogy, I learned about all these people and the role they played in California history, pre-statehood. The entire extended family would have loved to have those photos, that were all thrown away, or given to antique stores.

I found a few, through people posting notices on a genealogy forum, that they had old photos of the X family. Turns out, there are people who make a hobby or a business of scavenging other people's family photos from antique shops, and selling them through genealogy sites. It was weird buying our own family photos from strangers.

OP, you could probably frame that newspaper front page. That would make a nice family remembrance.
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Old Today, 09:23 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
This leads me to a question. Suppose you happen to have old newspapers of prominent historical events. And suppose you don't really want to hang on to them. What should you do with them? Is there someplace that would buy them from you? Should you donate them to a historical society? List them on eBay? Put them out with the recycling?
lol "Put them out with the recycling"? I think the OP's point is, that he's glad they weren't put out with the recycling. A historical society would be interested in them. Perhaps a local library. If they mention local figures in any of the articles, there may be a local organization that documents and archives histories of prominent former (and current) local residents. eBay isn't a bad idea, either, if the other options don't pan out.
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Old Today, 09:24 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,648 posts, read 70,531,500 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjshae View Post
You might consider getting them deacidified if you want to keep them a long time.
How do you do that? Who provides that service?
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Old Today, 09:34 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,648 posts, read 70,531,500 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nicet4 View Post

Why did she keep these? Nobody knows for sure but her future husband was serving in the Pacific at the time.
She had a loved one in the war, a very heavy personal investment, so victory was a big deal to her, more so than for others, who weren't similarly invested. But also, war time back home was no walk in the park. Resources were slim, food was not plentiful, citizens were urged to grow their own food in "victory gardens", women went to work for the first time, life was full of sacrifice and uncertainty. No one knew how the war would turn out. So Victory Day and the end of the war was a major lifetime event.
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Old Today, 09:45 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
6,325 posts, read 4,680,714 times
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A lot of the newspaper websites I look at are always asking for old issues they don't have. You might try unloading them there, that way you can read them online and not have the clutter.
Chroniclingamerica has a lot of newspapers online to read.
You can see almost every issue of the Chicago Tribune during the Civil War. I like reading the ads. I saw one where a restaurant was looking for healthy, clean young men to wash dishes. I would imagine they were hard to find back then.

https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/l...25/ed-1/seq-1/
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