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Old 08-14-2019, 05:40 AM
 
Location: SE UK
8,032 posts, read 6,739,204 times
Reputation: 5464

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2x3x29x41 View Post
It is true that enslavement and its historical proponents have gotten less popular over time (oh, the horror!).

But as for each generation getting 'more sensitive' in general? Please...

In the 1950s, at the height of the Cold War, the Cincinnati Reds had to become the 'Redlegs' in order to avoid the toxic association with communism. Popular music and television tipoed around the masses so as to avoid giving offense: not showing Elvis below the waist, editing out the phrase 'she gets high' from the Doors' Brea on Through. When was the last time we saw regular burnings of records in the United States? (we did after Lennon's 'we're bigger than Jesus' comment). Attire: long hair, facial hair, women in pants, etc. - the basis of these things were, in part, that they offended the usual suspects (conformists, who not only practice conformity themselves but demand it from everyone else). And does anyone really need a primer on how utterly offensive even the mere existence, much less any acknowledgment, of gays was until comparatively recently in American history?

Keep telling yourself that we're 'more offended' these days. We're not.



Actually, it's pretty obvious that the OP's intent is not to 'blame the English' but to create the false equivalency between a nation that practiced slavery for a time (the United Kingdom) and a nation that was founded entirely around the idea of slavery (the Confederacy), thereby legitimizing the latter.
Many nations have been 'founded' with the idea of slavery at their core. To think that only the US (or the UK for that matter) has ever had any envolvement in slavery is rather 'blinkered' thinking.
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Old Today, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
12,104 posts, read 4,132,139 times
Reputation: 7479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cape Cod Todd View Post
My wife is from Ireland so she is not a fan of the British by default but guess what she is an intelligent woman that does not fly off the handle in false outrage over a statue or a flag and she had relatives that were political prisoners when she was a kid. I wonder if she would be eligible for some sort of reparations?

The Brits were absolutely terrible to her people yet when we went to London a few years back we toured the city and saw the sites and had no fear of the crushing oppression that was all around us but then again my wife refuses to play the perpetual victim.
The problem's in Ireland were more to do with the hatred between the Unionist Catholic Population and the Irish Catholic Population, the security forces were just caught in the middle, and had to deal with a situation few people would relish. Most of the violence was carried out by paramilitaries who were often hated in ther own communities and killed more members of their own communities than anyone else.

A lot of British people have Irish ancestry and there are more first generation Irish in Great Britain than any where else in the world, and they are not oppressed.

in terms of the UK over 10% of the population over (6 million) actually have an Irsh grand parent and we have the largerst first generation Irish population at 633,000 outside of Ireland itself with a furtherfurther 1.87 million in Northern Ireland . Whilst over one third of the population of cities such as Manchester and Glasgow have Irish ancestry. In comparison the US has 127,000.

We are right beside Ireland, it's only a short flight or ferry ride to Ireland, and millions of people make the jorney every year, at the closest point Ireland is only 12 miles away and cities such as Liverpool have more Irish history than even Boston. Indeed it's estimated that three quarter (75%) of Liverpool's population is of Irish Ancestry.

Irish Roots - Visit Liverpool

Quote:

Three large and high quality data sets on Irish citizens resident outside the state canimmediately be identified. The first data set is the population of Northern Ireland whichstands at 1.87 million.

The second data set is derived from the UK’s 2015 Population Survey which indicates that are 382,000 people resident in the UK who were born int he “Republic of Ireland.”

Similarly there are at least 215,000 people born in Northern Ireland resident in England and Wales with at least a further 36,600 resident in Scotland.

In the first instance then we can identify a quantifiable 633,000 Irish citizens in Britain who are citizens based on being born on the island of Ireland.

The third dataset is the 2011-2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates which indicate that 127,000 people resident in America were born in Ireland.(This survey does not disaggregate between those born in Northern Ireland and the State).

Irish Emigration Patterns and Citizens Abroad
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Old Today, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
12,104 posts, read 4,132,139 times
Reputation: 7479
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2x3x29x41 View Post
It is true that enslavement and its historical proponents have gotten less popular over time (oh, the horror!).

But as for each generation getting 'more sensitive' in general? Please...

In the 1950s, at the height of the Cold War, the Cincinnati Reds had to become the 'Redlegs' in order to avoid the toxic association with communism. Popular music and television tipoed around the masses so as to avoid giving offense: not showing Elvis below the waist, editing out the phrase 'she gets high' from the Doors' Brea on Through. When was the last time we saw regular burnings of records in the United States? (we did after Lennon's 'we're bigger than Jesus' comment). Attire: long hair, facial hair, women in pants, etc. - the basis of these things were, in part, that they offended the usual suspects (conformists, who not only practice conformity themselves but demand it from everyone else). And does anyone really need a primer on how utterly offensive even the mere existence, much less any acknowledgment, of gays was until comparatively recently in American history?

Keep telling yourself that we're 'more offended' these days. We're not.



Actually, it's pretty obvious that the OP's intent is not to 'blame the English' but to create the false equivalency between a nation that practiced slavery for a time (the United Kingdom) and a nation that was founded entirely around the idea of slavery (the Confederacy), thereby legitimizing the latter.
Slavery was not legal in the UK itself and the UK was one of the first countries to abolish the slave trade, see British history in relation to William Wilberforce (1759-1833), John Newton (1725–1807) and numerous others who tirelessly campaigned for the slave trade to be abolished. After slavery was abolished the Royal Navt patrolled the seas to stop slave ships.

Slave Trade Act 1807 - Wikipedia

Whilst countries often administered themselves, for instance in terms of India, Britain never kept an army there of more than 70,000 and it was actually the Indians themselves that kept the population (which was nearly 400 million by the time of independence) in check. The Infians had previoysly been slaves of the Moghuls (Muslims) prior to the British Empire.

Britain had a small army and used to keep few troops in the Empire, although Britain had a vast navy in days of Empire which was always kept several times larger than it's nearest rivals.

Britain has no need to make an apology to India for Empire

As for England, the national flag is the St Georges Flag, the Uion Flag or Union Jack representsa the four nations of union than make up the United Kingdom.

Flag of England - Wikipedia

Union Jack - Wikipedia

Last edited by Brave New World; Today at 10:34 AM..
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