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Old Today, 12:53 PM
 
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Cahokia became the most important center for the people known today as Mississippians. Their settlements ranged across what is now the Midwest, Eastern, and Southeastern United States. Cahokia was located in a strategic position near the confluence of the Mississippi, Missouri, and Illinois Rivers. It maintained trade links with communities as far away as the Great Lakes to the north and the Gulf Coast to the south, trading in such exotic items as copper, Mill Creek chert,[15] and whelk shells.

Mill Creek chert, most notably, was used in the production of hoes, a high demand tool for farmers around Cahokia and other Mississippian centers. Cahokia's control of the manufacture and distribution of these hand tools was an important economic activity that allowed the city to thrive.[16] Mississippian culture pottery and stone tools in the Cahokian style were found at the Silvernale site[17] near Red Wing, Minnesota, and materials and trade goods from Pennsylvania, the Gulf Coast and Lake Superior have been excavated at Cahokia. Bartering, not money, was used in trade.[18]

At the high point of its development, Cahokia was the largest urban center north of the great Mesoamerican cities in Mexico and Central America. Although it was home to only about 1,000 people before circa 1050, its population grew rapidly after that date. According to a 2007 study in Quaternary Science Reviews, "Between AD 1050 and 1100, Cahokia's population increased from between 1,400 and 2,800 people to between 10,200 and 15,300 people".[19] an estimate that applies only to a 1.8-square-kilometre (0.69 sq mi) high density central occupation area.[20] Archaeologists estimate the city's population at between 6,000 and 40,000 at its peak,[21] with more people living in outlying farming villages that supplied the main urban center. In the early 21st century, new residential areas were found to the west of Cahokia as a result of archeological excavations, increasing estimates of area population.[22] If the highest population estimates are correct, Cahokia was larger than any subsequent city in the United States until the 1780s, when Philadelphia's population grew beyond 40,000.[23] Moreover, according to the same population estimates, the population of 13th-century Cahokia was equal to or larger than the population of 13th-century London.

 
Old Today, 01:53 PM
 
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Where is the dirt from? The text would have you believe ALL that dirt came from 400 miles away. But the actual site says they carried it in back packs over the course of hundreds of years and that the pits where they dug it from are nearby.

How much of the dirt was from 400 miles away and where? And it's a giant mound of dirt not a pyramid.
 
Old Today, 02:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madison999 View Post
How much of the dirt was from 400 miles away and where? And it's a giant mound of dirt not a pyramid.
The mounds and pyramids line the great river systems in a similar manner to what we see in Africa along the river Nile. The mounds were there for ceremonial purposes the same way they were in Mississippi.
 
Old Today, 02:05 PM
 
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Here is a video of a guy making a tool from Mill Creek chert. He's using an antler. I will assume that antler is from far away due to the size?

Primitive cave man skills

https://youtu.be/tmkNcDOQ5IA
 
Old Today, 02:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Makuria View Post
The mounds and pyramids line the great river systems in a similar manner to what we see in Africa along the river Nile. The mounds were there for ceremonial purposes the same way they were in Mississippi.
A picture I found but couldn't get focused suggested some other features. It was blurry but I think it suggested something to do with waste up on top, maybe like a giant outhouse?

Not sure if it was speculation or being presented as a known fact...
 
Old Today, 02:10 PM
 
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Moral of this story.. East St Louis was more civilized a thousand years ago, than it is today..

But seriously folks, I'll be here all week. Don't forget to tip your waiters and waitresses.. good night ~
 
Old Today, 02:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Babe_Ruth View Post
Moral of this story.. East St Louis was more civilized a thousand years ago, than it is today..

But seriously folks, I'll be here all week. Don't forget to tip your waiters and waitresses.. good night ~
Lol

But not so fast, digs have found remnants of human sacrifice.
 
Old Today, 02:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by madison999 View Post
Lol

But not so fast, digs have found remnants of human sacrifice.
What are you possibly trying to allude to with your disparaging remarks about this pre columbian American civilization? You're talking about human sacrifices on the site OK....talk about how cannibalism was seen in Europe as normal until the 20th. Talk about how the criminals who got sent to Jamestown from England resorted to eating each other, while you see Africans with bloated bellies in Ethiopia NEVER resorting to such barbarism as to eat another human. That seems like a more fair comparison since alot of what we know about Cahokia are relics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Babe_Ruth View Post
Moral of this story.. East St Louis was more civilized a thousand years ago, than it is today..
Hmm yeah I think that the white populations of East St. Louis set the tone for the craziness that plagues the city today with this event;

[url]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LavURTG8fNg[/url]

Let Josephine Baker tell you about the white "settlers" of East St. Louis since she actually survived the race riot;

start around 3:15
[url]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LavURTG8fNg[/url]
 
Old Today, 03:39 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Been to Cahokia many times and it is an amazing place and a World Heritage Site. Efforts are underway to make it a national park (finally). Years ago you could walk through the site and there were pottery shards and even grinding stones sticking out of the soil. A second large population center was recently discovered and excavated closer to the river. There are scores of outlier "suburban" sites. St. Louis was built on a large Mississippian site but only one small mound is still identifiable. Researchers have identified pottery made by the same potter in both Cahokia and in Wisconsin (Aztalan).
 
Old Today, 04:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Makuria View Post
What are you possibly trying to allude to with your disparaging remarks about this pre columbian American civilization? You're talking about human sacrifices on the site OK....talk about how cannibalism was seen in Europe as normal until the 20th. Talk about how the criminals who got sent to Jamestown from England resorted to eating each other, while you see Africans with bloated bellies in Ethiopia NEVER resorting to such barbarism as to eat another human. That seems like a more fair comparison since alot of what we know about Cahokia are relics.



Hmm yeah I think that the white populations of East St. Louis set the tone for the craziness that plagues the city today with this event;


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LavURTG8fNg

Let Josephine Baker tell you about the white "settlers" of East St. Louis since she actually survived the race riot;

start around 3:15

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LavURTG8fNg
I'm talking about Cahokia. They dug up bodies. Human sacrifice. Not unusual or surprising.

We get it, you hate Whitey. Go cry in your safe space.
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