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Old 09-01-2019, 06:53 AM
 
1,029 posts, read 239,745 times
Reputation: 3720

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Some people may look at old ads and think “Wow! Things were a lot cheaper back then!” But I have evidence that not everything was cheaper. We have a receipt from late 1973 showing Dad paid $689 for a Zenith console color television. What else was more expensive than it is now?
Not only was that television more expensive in nominal dollars, it was far more so when considering real (inflation-adjusted) dollars: annual per capita income in 1973 was barely $4000. Then there's the fact that that television weighed a ton, had a poorer image, and had access to far less content than exists today.

So the cost-to-product disparity between now and 1973 regarding televisions is far greater than just a simple comparison of nominal costs reveals.
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Old 09-01-2019, 08:06 AM
 
Location: 78745
3,054 posts, read 2,218,092 times
Reputation: 5262
I bought my 1st microwave oven in 1986 from Sears for about $380. It lasted close to 25 years. I bought my 2nd microwave in 2010 from an HEB grocery store in Austin for $49. It wasn't as big as the 1st microwave but it worked just as good. I still have it.
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Old 09-01-2019, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
9,703 posts, read 9,573,059 times
Reputation: 6844
Sugar was once referred to as “white gold”.
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Old 09-01-2019, 10:36 AM
 
Location: SF, CA
1,574 posts, read 726,013 times
Reputation: 2483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
I bought my 1st microwave oven in 1986 from Sears for about $380. It lasted close to 25 years. I bought my 2nd microwave in 2010 from an HEB grocery store in Austin for $49. It wasn't as big as the 1st microwave but it worked just as good. I still have it.
Microwave ovens can be remarkably long-lived... I have a Litton microwave, brought around 1981.
Litton is no longer in business... so the oven outlasted its manufacturer.
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Old 09-01-2019, 10:51 AM
 
4,094 posts, read 1,632,942 times
Reputation: 8094
1. eye glasses. just bought a pair online for $13+shipping.
2. watches. Amazon had some right now for a penny.
3. Benadryl. used to be prescription.
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Old 09-01-2019, 12:51 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA
5,061 posts, read 3,484,210 times
Reputation: 8228
Not exactly the old days. Cab service. Just a few years ago a trip from downtown San Francisco to the airport was about $100.00 Today with Uber it's around $37.00.
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Old 09-01-2019, 02:14 PM
 
278 posts, read 87,551 times
Reputation: 478
I can recall 2 items purchased by friends which were considered very expensive at the time.


1) In 1979, a friend bought a VCR for the sale price of $1500. It was huge, similar in size to a tape recorder. There was a pop-up top in which the tape was inserted and the mouse was connected to the VCR by a wire.


2) Another friend bought a complete desk top computer in 1998. The sale price was $3000. It included a keyboard, monitor which was as deep as a TV set, tower, and a wired mouse. He added 2 speakers which had to connected to either side of the monitor.
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Old 09-01-2019, 02:48 PM
 
278 posts, read 87,551 times
Reputation: 478
Some services were also much more expensive. My father got his first wireless phone in 1994 (Motorola flip phone). The cost of his monthly service, including taxes and fees, was about $205 per month. And, when he took the phone outside of our area, he had to pay a $7.95 roaming fee for each call that he made.
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Old 09-01-2019, 03:19 PM
 
2,530 posts, read 3,553,696 times
Reputation: 5103
Phone calls. I remember as a kid every time we talked to Grandma she said 'Hi' and then 'I've get to get off because this is costing too much money'.

Then when I was in college the tiered rates had everyone wanting to call after 9 p.m.

And remember when area codes mattered? Local or long distance indicated whether it was included in your home calling rate or you had to pay extra.

Now you call as often as you want, to whomever you want and talk for as long as you want for a fixed rate per month that is super cheap.
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Old 09-01-2019, 04:29 PM
 
3,540 posts, read 5,028,927 times
Reputation: 3542
In 1983 I paid $200 for a small 1- or 2-person brand tent from the "Moss" company of Maine. Today you can buy much larger tents for a fraction of that at any sporting-goods store.

A few years later, $350 for a rowing-machine, which I never used.
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