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Old 11-13-2019, 09:51 AM
 
1,387 posts, read 444,538 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
Because the English were the cruelest basterds in the history of the world, complete devoid of compassion. And by the way, lived in the filthiest cites.
Yes!

When King Henry the VIII became Protestant to marry his wives, the second (and probably the biggest) reason was he took over Catholic Church lands for his friends.

Quote:
The problem of poverty in England was exacerbated during the early 16th century by a dramatic increase in the population. This rose "…from little more than 2 million in 1485,…(to) about 2.8 million by the end of Henry VII's reign (1509)". The population was growing faster than the economy's ability to provide employment opportunities.[1] The problem was made worse because during the English Reformation, Henry VIII severed the ecclesiastical governance of his kingdoms of England and Ireland and made himself the "Supreme Governor" of the Church of England. This involved the Dissolution of the Monasteries in England and Wales: the assets of hundreds of rich religious institutions, including their great estates, were taken by the Crown. This had a devastating impact on poor relief. According to the historian Paul Slack, prior to the Dissolution "it has been estimated that monasteries alone provided 6,500 pounds[2] a year in alms before 1537 (equivalent to £3,700,000 in 2018); and that sum was not made good by private benefactions until after 1580."[3] In addition to the closing of the monasteries, most hospitals (which in the 16th century were generally almshouses rather than medical institutions) were also closed, as they "had come to be seen as special types of religious houses".[4] This left many of the elderly and sick without accommodation or care. In 1531, the Vagabonds and Beggars Act was revised, and a new Act was passed by parliament which did make some provision for the different classes of the poor. The sick, the elderly, and the disabled were to be issued with licences to beg. But those who were out of work and in search of employment were still not spared punishment. Throughout the 16th century, a fear of social unrest was the primary motive for much legislation that was passed by parliament.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poor_relief

Protestant theology states:

Quote:
Though sin in the world is the source of human-caused suffering—evidenced in war, violence, poverty, hatred, anger, etc.—some of the suffering is perceived to be a direct outcome of individual and social behavior and thus a natural consequence, and some of it is perceived to be divine punishment. There is much diversity of belief around the meaning of suffering.
https://www.patheos.com/library/prot...-evil.aspx?p=2
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Old 11-13-2019, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,832 posts, read 6,617,166 times
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FWIW it wasn't as common as one would think. In 1700 England and Wales had a population of 5 Million; approximately 10K people a year were imprisoned.

And, often it seemed that people would have some means of working while in the prison.

I've read some of the Master and Commander stories and it's quite interesting...my favorite was when Captain Aubrey press-ganged the bailiffs trying to arrest him.
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Old 11-16-2019, 12:13 PM
 
Location: my little town
1,431 posts, read 482,540 times
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It still exists now in some states. It may start with a traffic fine, then court costs and interest, or a shady credit card charge.
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Old 11-16-2019, 02:34 PM
 
1,387 posts, read 444,538 times
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Originally Posted by Nattering Heights View Post
It still exists now in some states. It may start with a traffic fine, then court costs and interest, or a shady credit card charge.
Or someone wrongly arrested and can't afford bail.
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Old 11-20-2019, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
4,213 posts, read 2,425,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Msgenerse View Post
Sure they may not pay their debts, but by imprisoning them, they most certainly won't have any avenue to pay their debts, so wasn't it really very counterproductive to imprison people for not paying it?
Not exactly, if said person was a low life with no connections then sure, but other wise it would encourage their family and friends to cough up the money.
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Old Yesterday, 10:38 PM
 
3,422 posts, read 2,396,582 times
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Child support end up in prison for not paying.
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