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Old 11-26-2019, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Here
1,570 posts, read 393,236 times
Reputation: 5885

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNgFooCj View Post
California's 6 largest cities:
Los Angeles
San Diego
San Jose
San Francisco
Sacramento
Fresno

Texas' 6 largest cities:
Houston
San Antonio
Dallas
Austin
Fort Worth
El Paso
One, I wouldn't over-think this. There's no telling when a city is christened what it's relative population will be centuries in the future.

Two, you've arbitrarily chosen the top six cities from each state. The next three California cities are Long Beach, Oakland and Bakersfield. Also, six as a sample size is way too small to draw any meaningful conclusions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNgFooCj View Post
Weren't they both under Mexican rule until about the same time? Besides that all of Texas' 6 largest cities are located further south than any of California's 6 largest cities with the exception of San Diego and Dallas/Fort Worth which are both at 32 degrees latitude. Are Spanish names less popular further from the West Coast?
Three, proximity to Mexico is irrelevant. Both California and Texas were part of Mexico, and before that of the Spanish Empire.
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Old 11-26-2019, 11:28 PM
 
7,052 posts, read 6,810,056 times
Reputation: 3300
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNgFooCj View Post
California's 6 largest cities:
Los Angeles
San Diego
San Jose
San Francisco
Sacramento
Fresno

Texas' 6 largest cities:
Houston
San Antonio
Dallas
Austin
Fort Worth
El Paso

Weren't they both under Mexican rule until about the same time? Besides that all of Texas' 6 largest cities are located further south than any of California's 6 largest cities with the exception of San Diego and Dallas/Fort Worth which are both at 32 degrees latitude. Are Spanish names less popular further from the West Coast?
Texas founded by American colonists who later rebelled against the Spanish speaking Mexicans
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Old 11-27-2019, 02:39 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
6,879 posts, read 10,945,271 times
Reputation: 6368
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2x3x29x41 View Post
Both California and Texas were part of Mexico, and before that of the Spanish Empire.
Spain may have claimed a lot of territories in what today are part of the United States, but, in times when the main energy source for land transport was horses and other mammals, including humans, sometimes aided by the wheel, the Spanish government never really had a significant presence in California or Texas, or even Florida for that matter ... 1850, 1845, 1845 ... they all became US states around the same time, no coincidence, railroad.

As mentioned, a Rome-based organization (so-called catholic church) may have spear-headed settlements especially in California, but the Spanish never followed up with the entire spear, so to speak. And the Mexicans were quite occupied with trying to consolidate their governance over their closest territories, with mixed results for many decades; in the meantime, I never heard of the prowess of the Mexican navy or that they were the first to develop coast-to-coast railroad, or any railroad.

We could discuss the details, but Americans of northern European ancestry settling California, Texas and Florida was not the same as a military invasion of Veracruz and Mexico City.

As for the names of the cities, what did William Shakespeare say?

Last edited by bale002; 11-27-2019 at 03:13 AM..
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Old 11-27-2019, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Here
1,570 posts, read 393,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
Spain may have claimed a lot of territories in what today are part of the United States, but, in times when the main energy source for land transport was horses and other mammals, including humans, sometimes aided by the wheel, the Spanish government never really had a significant presence in California or Texas, or even Florida for that matter ... 1850, 1845, 1845 ... they all became US states around the same time, no coincidence, railroad.
Like I said, don't overthink this.

This topic is about the names of cities in those areas, so the only relevant government presence was that necessary to leave such an imprint. Of course, the missions were important, as has been noted. Those missions were protected by imperial soldiers garrisoned therein. Spain decided who ran the missions - at one replacing the Jesuits with Franciscans, for example. And even the missions were not simply named by agents of the church. San Diego? That mission was named after the presidio established by a military/exploratory expedition sent by New Spain. There was certainly more official Spanish authority present in California and Texas than, say, Russian authority on behalf of the Tsar exerted in Alaska. Yet Alaska is strewn with Russian nomenclature.

So there was certainly enough official Spanish presence at work to leave the city-names being discussed.
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Old 11-27-2019, 05:53 AM
 
7,714 posts, read 3,194,755 times
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Call me nuts, but aren’t San Antonio and El Paso, Spanish names?
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Old 11-27-2019, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
5,589 posts, read 10,103,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TreeBeard View Post
Call me nuts, but aren’t San Antonio and El Paso, Spanish names?
You're nuts. Yes, they are.
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Old 11-27-2019, 06:18 AM
 
12,442 posts, read 5,569,812 times
Reputation: 20611
I'm not sure about Texas, but here in CA there are tons of areas, towns, and localities that have kept their Spanish names including the names of mountains, lakes, rivers. These names were already established when CA became a state and are part of CA history. Personally for me, the names are beautiful and make the state more interesting and colorful.

Sierra Nevada Mountains
San Gabriel Mountains
Santa Susana Mountains
Santa Ana River
Santa Paula
San Bernardino
Santa Monica
Escondido
Santa Rosa
Ventura
Santa Maria
El Segundo
Santa Catalina Island

The list is almost endless. There are also many places that have kept their Native American names as well such as
Malibu
Cucamonga
Yosemite
Temecula
Napa
Mojave desert
Tehachapi
Tahoe
Yucaipa

Last edited by marino760; 11-27-2019 at 07:01 AM..
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Old 11-27-2019, 07:00 AM
Status: "Absolute power corrupts absolutely." (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: City Data Land
15,637 posts, read 9,042,203 times
Reputation: 30791
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkwensky View Post
Because the major Texas cities were founded after independence from Mexico.
This is a great question. I didn't know about it. I've never taken Texas history. Thanks OP!
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Old 11-27-2019, 09:27 AM
 
1,606 posts, read 516,833 times
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Someone never woke up in history class
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Old 11-27-2019, 02:15 PM
 
2,685 posts, read 2,025,994 times
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In New World Spanish, "Austin" derives from the lunar month around August (Ostiano); Waco comes from "Wackollo" meaning goofy but not exactly chollo; and Dallas is a contortion of Daliosiente which meant Tuesday in the Mayan areas - a day when the market was open. My dad (pop-ollo) told me that "Fort Worth" was coined from the word "fosuerte" which had something to do with a lame horse.

Interesting observation, though.
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