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Old 06-28-2008, 03:49 PM
 
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I'd like a simple summary--LOL--of this group --pre American Revolution.

I've read some and not being familiar with all that went on between/among the English/Irish/Scots at this time cannot really put the pieces together.

I'm in Atlanta and I know a small group of Scots settled in Decatur, GA prior to the founding of the city of Atlanta.

Whatever you've got would be appreciated.

I know that the Highlanders went on to Western North Carolina after they were allowed to leave Scotland after Culloden. Very familiar with the Highlanders' situation.

Do not know much about what was going on in the 'Lowlands' around the English border. Plenty--judging from the # of Google hits.

tia
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Old 06-28-2008, 05:44 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,514 posts, read 25,724,912 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeAhike View Post
I'd like a simple summary--LOL--of this group --pre American Revolution.

I've read some and not being familiar with all that went on between/among the English/Irish/Scots at this time cannot really put the pieces together.

I'm in Atlanta and I know a small group of Scots settled in Decatur, GA prior to the founding of the city of Atlanta.

Whatever you've got would be appreciated.

I know that the Highlanders went on to Western North Carolina after they were allowed to leave Scotland after Culloden. Very familiar with the Highlanders' situation.

Do not know much about what was going on in the 'Lowlands' around the English border. Plenty--judging from the # of Google hits.

tia
Oooooooooh, this is neither simple nor quick.

Start with the border reiver clans. There are several sites.

Then move on to the Montgomery/Hamilton settlement in County Down & County Antrim. It's success brought on the resettlement of the Lowland Scots & English in the rest of Ulster Province, by James I/VI.

Keep in mind that the Jacobites were Roman Catholic and Anglican. Highlanders & Irish were supposedly banned from Ulster Province's plantations, but records show what appear to be Irish clan members in some areas.

The English tried to force being Anglican on the residents of Ulster Province. The Scots were mostly Presbyterian, but Quaker meetings soon sprang up as well.

Religious & financial measures resulted in the Ulster Scots streaming out to go to North Amerca. Most tended to go to Philadelphia. Some got off the boat at the lower counties (later Delaware).

They went west of Philadelphia, then went streaming down the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road.

With what you listed, I can't tell you anything else concerning Georgia, but you might want to look at Wilkes County GA or Wrightsboro Georgia.

That's as short as I could make it, but please look online for the websites to fill in the massive holes in what I just wrote
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Old 06-28-2008, 07:03 PM
 
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Thank you so much--I'm just starting to research this and I think it is going to be interesting.

LOL--The Scots have been productive since they arrived in the New World there is evidence of that.

I read the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon which well covers the Highlanders.

I live near Decatur, GA and believe that those that settled here were Lowlanders. duh=--Columbia Seminary/Theological Institute, Agnes Scott College and much more.
DeKalb County, Georgia was named for Baron? Von DeKalb/German but it was those busy Scots that got this show on the road I am certain of that.

LoL--of course they worked with the English/Methodists here at Emory University. Things have really worked out pretty well in NE Atlanta and the entire city because of the 'Teamwork' and vision of the early settlers.

I will keep reading. Plenty of links to check out and places to gather more FYI on this. Born and Bred in this Briarpatch and with the literary giants that have preceded me I am in the mood to tell some of their stories.

In the Atlanta forum people move from other places and don't seem to really know what sort of effort was made to get things this far. The city was burned during Sherman's March to the Sea so we do not have the historic buildings that some cities do but it is a complex and interesting culture growing more diverse each day.

Like Carrie Bradshaw/Sex and the City--'Nobody picks on my city'. 'Dance with the one that brung you'--some of my relatives would say that. Farmers--English, Scots-Irish, German and whatever, maybe some French thrown in.

So off to Google to read a little more.

The most complicated topic I have selected in a while.

If anyone can tell me why so many Scots have 'English' names that would be helpful. Huntley, Bacon, Cherry---all Scots they assure me. My friend from Indiana is a 'Mc' so that is easier to understand although in her area of Indiana/northwest--there were many Germans--Quakers, Methodists so that influenced her style.

As a 'retired' teacher I certainly hope that this is being covered along with everything else that teachers are asked to do these days.

4th of July is coming and I hope many will take a moment to reflect upon what people for over 200 years have given their lives to build. Far from a 'Perfect' country but my flag will be flying on the 4th.

thanks again.
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Old 06-28-2008, 10:45 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,514 posts, read 25,724,912 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeAhike View Post
Thank you so much--I'm just starting to research this and I think it is going to be interesting.

LOL--The Scots have been productive since they arrived in the New World there is evidence of that.

I read the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon which well covers the Highlanders.

I live near Decatur, GA and believe that those that settled here were Lowlanders. duh=--Columbia Seminary/Theological Institute, Agnes Scott College and much more.
DeKalb County, Georgia was named for Baron? Von DeKalb/German but it was those busy Scots that got this show on the road I am certain of that.

LoL--of course they worked with the English/Methodists here at Emory University. Things have really worked out pretty well in NE Atlanta and the entire city because of the 'Teamwork' and vision of the early settlers.

I will keep reading. Plenty of links to check out and places to gather more FYI on this. Born and Bred in this Briarpatch and with the literary giants that have preceded me I am in the mood to tell some of their stories.

In the Atlanta forum people move from other places and don't seem to really know what sort of effort was made to get things this far. The city was burned during Sherman's March to the Sea so we do not have the historic buildings that some cities do but it is a complex and interesting culture growing more diverse each day.

Like Carrie Bradshaw/Sex and the City--'Nobody picks on my city'. 'Dance with the one that brung you'--some of my relatives would say that. Farmers--English, Scots-Irish, German and whatever, maybe some French thrown in.

So off to Google to read a little more.

The most complicated topic I have selected in a while.

If anyone can tell me why so many Scots have 'English' names that would be helpful. Huntley, Bacon, Cherry---all Scots they assure me. My friend from Indiana is a 'Mc' so that is easier to understand although in her area of Indiana/northwest--there were many Germans--Quakers, Methodists so that influenced her style.

As a 'retired' teacher I certainly hope that this is being covered along with everything else that teachers are asked to do these days.

4th of July is coming and I hope many will take a moment to reflect upon what people for over 200 years have given their lives to build. Far from a 'Perfect' country but my flag will be flying on the 4th.

thanks again.
Ummmmmmm......... to understand what went on with the Highlanders, you really have to go back to JamesI/VI, in records. An amazing number are onlne.

Atlanta was burned by Sherman after the battle of Atlanta, after Hood got away, before setting off on his march to the sea..

Lowland Scots were on both sides of the border.

My mother's family was, as my grandfather called it, Scotch-Irish. The name was a Mc name & they went west to Indiiana, instead of going south.
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Old 06-29-2008, 07:04 PM
 
8,862 posts, read 14,392,042 times
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Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Ummmmmmm......... to understand what went on with the Highlanders, you really have to go back to JamesI/VI, in records. An amazing number are onlne.

Atlanta was burned by Sherman after the battle of Atlanta, after Hood got away, before setting off on his march to the sea..

Lowland Scots were on both sides of the border.

My mother's family was, as my grandfather called it, Scotch-Irish. The name was a Mc name & they went west to Indiiana, instead of going south.
I've decided to try this forum:

Ulster-Scots Online

Something 'went wrong' somewhere when I registered last night. I take that as a sign to 'slow down'. I have wanted to get this piece of history straight for a long time. No, I cannot at this time go back to James/VI. I know about Culloden and that the Highlanders went to Western NC--some may have stayed in Ga--but most of our Scots are Lowlanders/Scotch-Irish whatever they wish to be called.

I once went into a history forum to discuss this but they were too well-informed and kept focusing on details and I wanted the Big Picture.

My degrees are in Elementary Education--in Georgia--I can tell you plenty about Atlanta's/Georgia's history and what has transpired since the Civil War. My relatives love to discuss that period of history.

I taught 5th graders US history--colonial to 20 C--and the 4th graders study cultures across the globe. Doing good to get those concepts across. Cough.

Then I taught only Language Arts--Spelling, Reading, Writing--to inner city students and we had to really work on those skills. Children in the deep South really were not served very well by their school systems. Some better now.

The Ulster Scots did a 'Lot' in DeKalb County/Atlanta, GA. For personal reasons now that I am not teaching this is something I want to discuss. Might go around to schools and 'teach'/tell a few stories to kids. They need to know their heritage. Very diverse society in Atlanta now. 'Gotta know where you came from before you can Get to Where you Are Going'--that is what I say.

Too much misinformation about the South is floating around and I don't have time to update people individually. No--we do not have slaves, no plantations either, few fly the Confederate flag--least of all those who left Scotland, Ireland, England, Germany and any place across the globe where people were persecuted for 'Differences' unjustly.

That is why I won't to know more about this topic.

Thanks, Again.

TakeAhike
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Old 07-02-2008, 07:15 PM
 
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Lowland Scots are descended from the Anglo-Saxons just like the English... and their native language (before being influenced by Gaelic and standard English) had much more in common with English than the Gaelic that was spoken by the Highland Scots. This may be why Lowland Scots have English sounding last names. Basically, Highland Scots are ethnically Celtic, while Lowland Scots are ethnically Germanic.

I discovered a lot of Ulster Scots/Scots-Irish in my family tree a few years back. When I told my father that a lot of our ancestors were born in Ireland, he said "Well, we should be celebrating St. Patrick's day from now on". I tried to explain to him what Scots-Irish were and that if we started celebrating St. Patrick's day they would probably be rolling in their graves, lol....but I think it was too complicated for him.
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Old 07-02-2008, 07:30 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
10,165 posts, read 18,142,618 times
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Originally Posted by Coem View Post
Lowland Scots are descended from the Anglo-Saxons just like the English... and their native language (before being influenced by Gaelic and standard English) had much more in common with English than the Gaelic that was spoken by the Highland Scots. This may be why Lowland Scots have English sounding last names. Basically, Highland Scots are ethnically Celtic, while Lowland Scots are ethnically Germanic.

I discovered a lot of Ulster Scots/Scots-Irish in my family tree a few years back. When I told my father that a lot of our ancestors were born in Ireland, he said "Well, we should be celebrating St. Patrick's day from now on". I tried to explain to him what Scots-Irish were and that if we started celebrating St. Patrick's day they would probably be rolling in their graves, lol....but I think it was too complicated for him.

Very good, I get a kick out of lowland Scots trying to horn in on the Celtic thing. Lowland Scots also have a bit of Norman in them too but half the people in Europe have that including Sicilians.

The Anglo-Irish of the Church of Ireland brand of Protestantism have no problem with St. Patrick's Day, it's a shame the way the Ulster Scots have cut themselves off from being Irish; Christ, if the Norsemen, Normans and English could assimilate.....
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Old 07-03-2008, 08:57 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,514 posts, read 25,724,912 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coem View Post
Lowland Scots are descended from the Anglo-Saxons just like the English... and their native language (before being influenced by Gaelic and standard English) had much more in common with English than the Gaelic that was spoken by the Highland Scots. This may be why Lowland Scots have English sounding last names. Basically, Highland Scots are ethnically Celtic, while Lowland Scots are ethnically Germanic.

I discovered a lot of Ulster Scots/Scots-Irish in my family tree a few years back. When I told my father that a lot of our ancestors were born in Ireland, he said "Well, we should be celebrating St. Patrick's day from now on". I tried to explain to him what Scots-Irish were and that if we started celebrating St. Patrick's day they would probably be rolling in their graves, lol....but I think it was too complicated for him.
Check results in DNA groups on the Lowland Scot names. Some are Celtic, but not Gaelic. Also keep in mind that there were Lowland Scots living in the Highlands with Highland clans.

Tell your father that the Ulster-Scots are Orangemen. He'll get it then.
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Old 07-03-2008, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Ireland
650 posts, read 1,089,163 times
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The Ulster Historical Foundation in Belfast has a bookstore full of wonderful books that cover the whole range of genealogy and history: from the "big picture" as you say, to very specific detailed family information and dates in history.

I realise that a week or two in Belfast probably isn't an ideal option for you this summer LOL (it IS a great city to visit if you ever have the chance!) but these books do exist, with titles like "The Ulster-Scots in Appalachia" or "The Irish in Tennessee" etc, with good stories and specifics like names of ships, etc. You can find the Foundation online at , then click their BOOKS link along the navigation bar---you'll then have titles and book information to take to your local library, who can hopefully find them for you, if not in-house then through interlibrary loan. Or you can order them directly from the Foundation, but with postage and the poor dollar exchange rate, that'd be a bit expensive.

Have you tried your local historical society? They're usually fantastic help. There are also a host of Irish-American societies that may have resources, too: your local public library should be able to put you in touch with them, as well as more books or online information.

Hope that helps!
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Old 07-03-2008, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Ireland
650 posts, read 1,089,163 times
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ARGH the link didn't come through above. Ulster Historical Foundation is at Ulster Historical Foundation - Irish Genealogy Research Ireland, Ulster, Antrim, Down, Belfast: Home .
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