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Old 04-16-2009, 07:10 AM
 
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Default The Fate of the Roman Emperors

Was looking for some info on one of the Roman Emperors and came across this list:The Fate of Roman Emperors - All Empires
It is pretty interesting in that it gives the cause of death of each one...a handy guide to how they died...
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Old 04-16-2009, 08:31 AM
 
Location: BOY-see
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Untimely deaths were fairly common, that's for sure. By the era of the barracks emperors, they were the norm. Probably the Empire's best century overall was the 2nd CE, with able governance and general stability until the last decade or so. Interesting link, TR; if one limits one's view to the period ending in 476 CE, though, the proportion of untimely deaths is far higher than the site's owner mentions.
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Old 04-16-2009, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Wherever women are
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trudy Rose View Post
Was looking for some info on one of the Roman Emperors and came across this list:The Fate of Roman Emperors - All Empires
It is pretty interesting in that it gives the cause of death of each one...a handy guide to how they died...
Trudy, the list is mysteriously missing the list of gentlemen who were assassinated by the PG, right from Pertinax.

Gibbon documented that for a powerful tyrant not to be assassinated was an achievement.

That's why Diocletian amazes me. He died a normal death. And he retired himself.

Much like Sulla. Sulla is the greatest, though
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Old 04-16-2009, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
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Nero doesn't appear on any of the three lists, he must still be alive.

Scanning the divisions, I note that the real Pax Romana, at least the internal one, was from 96 CE to 192CE. Following Domitian's stabbing, 96 years passed before there was another Emperor murdered, it took Commodus to reinspire the tradition and what followed was the Golden Age of Imperial Homicide. Between 211 CE and 222 CE, five out of five serving emperors had their reigns ended by murder, assassination or execution. After a brief respite, things got hopping again as 235 CE yielded one murdered Ceasar, a warmup for 238 CE when three were killed in the same year. This showmanship was repeated shortly thereafter. In 249, one was murdered, and then 253 was another hat trick, three dispatched in that single year.

It slowed a bit after that, briefly rallied between 272 and 285 which saw five emperors get slaughtered, but petered out and became rare and widely distributed for the rest of the empire's life.
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Old 04-16-2009, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Wherever women are
19,023 posts, read 13,287,265 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandstander View Post
Nero doesn't appear on any of the three lists, he must still be alive.

Scanning the divisions, I note that the real Pax Romana, at least the internal one, was from 96 CE to 192CE. Following Domitian's stabbing, 96 years passed before there was another Emperor murdered, it took Commodus to reinspire the tradition and what followed was the Golden Age of Imperial Homicide. Between 211 CE and 222 CE, five out of five serving emperors had their reigns ended by murder, assassination or execution. After a brief respite, things got hopping again as 235 CE yielded one murdered Ceasar, a warmup for 238 CE when three were killed in the same year. This showmanship was repeated shortly thereafter. In 249, one was murdered, and then 253 was another hat trick, three dispatched in that single year.

It slowed a bit after that, briefly rallied between 272 and 285 which saw five emperors get slaughtered, but petered out and became rare and widely distributed for the rest of the empire's life.
Have you ever thought that Augustus, in his personal regard and glory, created the PG within the capital, which perfectly served his purpose and even strengthened him, but eventually went on to become the official emperor slayer for generations to come?
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Old 04-16-2009, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
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Originally Posted by Colossus_Antonis View Post
Have you ever thought that Augustus, in his personal regard and glory, created the PG within the capital, which perfectly served his purpose and even strengthened him, but eventually went on to become the official emperor slayer for generations to come?

For all their might and glory, the Romans never solved the problem of orderly power transition. That they stood supreme for 400 years despite this severe shortcoming, I view as a tribute to the stability of Rome's legal and cultural institutions. One constant throughout all the leadership intramurals was that no matter who wound up in charge, it still meant something to be a Roman citizen. None of the leaders was ever so stupid as to mess with that fundamental precept. If you were lucky enough to have been born a free man, and you got with the basic program, you really could go anywhere within the empire with the security of knowing that the empire stood behind you, that those who assailed you would become the enemies of the empire.

That, and the efficiency of the Roman bureaucracy, kept things stable enough to survive what was truly a ridiculously unstable executive structure.
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