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Old 01-10-2016, 06:53 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bagster View Post
I wonder what kept wildfires under control? I guess they burned from one large river to the next.
Nature controlled wild fires. They were a necessary part of the environment and necessary for the land to regenerate itself with many plant species not able to reproduce unless a wildfire had gone through an area. This is especially true in western states.
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Old 01-10-2016, 11:07 AM
 
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Damn, there goes my faith in the Sons of the Pioneers!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQc5gDXQGIs
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Old 01-10-2016, 03:55 PM
 
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Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Nature controlled wild fires. They were a necessary part of the environment and necessary for the land to regenerate itself with many plant species not able to reproduce unless a wildfire had gone through an area. This is especially true in western states.

How did nature control them? I'm sure a few were also put out by rain and others were stopped when the wind shifted. We get grass fires in OK that would burn clear to Canada if it weren't for fire departments, and the fact that lots of land is now devoid of vegetation because of agriculture. Rivers will stop some, but embers can also carry for hundreds of yards under the right conditions.
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Old 01-11-2016, 11:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bagster View Post
How did nature control them? I'm sure a few were also put out by rain and others were stopped when the wind shifted. We get grass fires in OK that would burn clear to Canada if it weren't for fire departments, and the fact that lots of land is now devoid of vegetation because of agriculture. Rivers will stop some, but embers can also carry for hundreds of yards under the right conditions.
That was pretty much it.
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Old 01-11-2016, 12:59 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post

It occurred to me that what we see today, can give us no sense at all of what the world must have been like to people even in fairly recent history.


Very true. In the Ozarks of Missouri and Arkansas you will often see dense forests with a tangled understory and gravel bottom creeks and rivers. Before deforestation the streams had bedrock channels with little or no gravel and much of the forest land was a more open savanna with a grassy prairie-like turf. Pine trees were more common than today. There is a record of the pre-settlement conditions because the land surveyors in the 1800s walked the section lines and recorded trees and the open nature of the forest.
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Old 01-11-2016, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MidValleyDad View Post
That was pretty much it.
Which is why the plains were grasslands. The fires burned any saplings before they grew into trees. the only places there's be trees would have been on islands on large rivers like the Arkansas, Platte or the Missouri.

That's another thing: the rivers weren't damned 200 years ago, so even what appear to be pretty paltry rivers today could have stopped a wildfire that long ago.
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