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Old 09-17-2009, 08:38 AM
 
594 posts, read 1,075,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcrackly View Post
Years ago I brought this up to a co-worker who was of Irish ancestry as I marveled at his brilliant red beard below his wispy blond head. He was highly offended and refuted my assertion. Being an African-American I am acutely aware of the many bloods in my family line, both from seduction or force.
It's pretty hard to be from an island nation, no matter how warrior-like, and not have been infiltrated. I understand that "Dublin" is a Norse name.
The Vikings were equal opportunistic raiders, having little respect for persons or places. Monasteries or fortresses made little difference to them. Dublin was definitely a stopover point on their way to other venues. In fact, "According to Irish annals, Dublin was founded in 841 as a Viking longphort (ship fortress) at the ford of the River Liffey, at a place known to the Irish as Dubb-Linn, the Black Pool." (Reference: Vikings by Magnus Magnassun.) It's said that the reason there are so many red-haired people in Iceland is that the Vikings raiders forcibly carried off Irish women.

A look at the map reveals the stamp that the Vikings left on the British Isles. Place names in, Northumbria and Scotland all attest to the presence of the Vikings. The city of York (called Jorvik) was an important Viking trading center. It features the Viking age excavation site, which I have had the great pleasure of visiting. The town name of Thirsk popularized by veterinarian James Herriot is of Viking origin. Thurso in Scotland is another and there are many more.

Following is a poem said to have been written in the margin of a manuscript by an Irish monk in the ninth century:

Bitter is the wind tonight,
White the tresses of the sea;
I have no fear the Viking hordes
Will sail the seas on such a night.

.
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Old 09-17-2009, 08:54 AM
 
Location: St. Augustine
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That there is "Danish" blood in the Irish is no news, my mother told me that 55 years ago. People get around.
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Old 09-17-2009, 09:19 AM
 
Location: BOY-see
4,327 posts, read 6,722,019 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
I believe that Dublin is from the Irish "dubh linn," black pool. I think I have read that it referred to a wide place in the LIffey.
That makes more sense as a place name from long ago than another way that could be parsed in Irish, 'black with us' (what exactly would that really mean?). I guess the more modern Irish name (kev knows, but for general knowledge, Baile átha Cliath) goes back to some three centuries after the Vikings retired from Viking. What I do not understand is the word order of dubh linn. Why was it not linn dubh? That would be the normal modern order of noun and adjective.
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Old 09-17-2009, 10:09 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishtom29 View Post
That there is "Danish" blood in the Irish is no news, my mother told me that 55 years ago. People get around.
IrishTom,
Your note reminded me of writer Lucius Beebe's comment on a canine's pedigree that it was of "chaotic ancestry." So it is with all of us humans.
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Old 09-17-2009, 10:24 AM
 
Location: BOY-see
4,327 posts, read 6,722,019 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Walmsley View Post
IrishTom,
Your note reminded me of writer Lucius Beebe's comment on a canine's pedigree that it was of "chaotic ancestry." So it is with all of us humans.
One of the more sobering evidences of this is the discovery, fairly late in the apartheid days of South Africa, that the typical South African blanke (classified legally as white) was roughly 5% black African. And yet given the way the Trekboers and Voortrekkers moved into the land, seeking autonomy in just about every sense, and given the population demographics of the land, it still amazes that Afrikaners had such an incredibly hard time with the reality that they were virtually all, by RSA standards, 'coloured' (classified legally as of mixed race). If this was the case after less than half the time since the Vikings first planted their, er, seed in the Gaelic lands, then it should be almost impossible for any hereditary modern Irish person to lack Viking blood.

Then again, we used to have such an involved vocabulary in the US to describe the exact percentage of African heritage (quadroon, octoroon, and many other terms now mostly forgotten) we probably point fingers from sandy ground.
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Old 09-17-2009, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
2,740 posts, read 4,996,936 times
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That's an interesting saying, J_K_K, " pointing fingers from sandy ground".
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Old 09-17-2009, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque
6,507 posts, read 6,787,035 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Exitus Acta Probat View Post
There's Mediterranean blood in the region as well, because the proto-Celts came from the Iberian Peninsula. Examples:


That would be West Atlantic blood. The Celts lent/exported their culture and language across Europe. The west Atlantic was the most recent to absorb it, and the only cultures that maintained it into the present day are those on the northwestern fringe (Galicia, Brittany, Cornwall, Ireland, highland/isles of Scotland).

Portuguese and coastal Spaniards do indeed share blood with the Irish and Scots. That is the origin of the term 'Black Irish' all of these people from the Ibero-Atlantic coast to the north of Scotland had genetic relationships and a common culture evident today in Megalithic structures along the Atlantic coast for thousands of years before the first 'Celt' came into contact with them thus destroying their native culture under an onslaught of Celtic cultural hegemony.

By contrast, the English and the Vikings barely touched these peoples.


ABQConvict
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Old 09-17-2009, 05:36 PM
 
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Well, with my mother's family being primarily from Denmark, and my dad's from Ireland and Scotland, I guess that means I'm related to myself...

We're all mutts anyway...
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Old 09-17-2009, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Mesa, Az
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One thing not many people realize is that most English, Irish, Scots, Welsh, Spanish, Portuguese and many other western Euro men (and their New World descendants both Hispanic and 'Anglo') all a share the R1b Y chromosome. Hell; I have that Y and my dad is from Hungary.
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Old 09-17-2009, 07:30 PM
 
Location: central North Carolina
62 posts, read 96,867 times
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Very interesting thread! Found this website a while back. Just type in a surname and find out it's origins and history. http://www.houseofnames.com/xq/ASP/s...namesearch.htm

I have German, Celt, and lots of Anglo-Norman and Anglo-Saxon surnames of my ancestors on both sides of my family.
You may be surprised when you type in some family surnames.

As someone said: we are all mutts!
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