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Old 03-01-2010, 12:40 PM
 
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Since this is not a political board as you correctly noted I won't continue the discussion on hunger versus poverty and why various organizations stress this in the US.

Its certainly true that starvation not hunger was common in Ireland. And that this transformed the situation in Ireland. Its remarkably that in 1844 there were around 8 million Irish. There was about 4 million in 2000. Few countries in the world have half the population now they did a century and a half ago. Most did not starve, although many did, they left Ireland.
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Old 03-01-2010, 03:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Fish was a main food source for the poor in many other countries and catching it isn't particularly expensive to catch. Hmm, I can sit here and watch my family starve or I can go to the coast and catch some fish (one would think their catholicism might have put that idea in their heads).
"According to British law, Irish Catholics could not apply for fishing or hunting licenses."

The Irish Famine, Or Passive Genocide

History of Irish Potato Famine (http://mysite.verizon.net/cbladey/patat/ws.html - broken link)

A Death-Dealing Famine: The Great ... - Google Books

Fishing and the Famine
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Old 03-01-2010, 05:40 PM
 
Location: NC
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Originally Posted by Trudy Rose View Post
Not everyone lived on the coast. Many of the ones who did sold their small boats for money..One explaination is in this article:The HIstory Place - Irish Potato Famine
Not many had the means to just pick up and hang out the "Gone Fishin" sign
And many of those that could just pick up ended up booking it to America instead.
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Old 03-01-2010, 06:46 PM
 
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One of the many ironies of the time was that the British government, which did little to help the people of Ireland, paid for ships to take them elsewhere. Some estimates place the number of dead as 20 percent on the ships. Although we have no real way to know. It was probably higher.
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Old 03-01-2010, 07:20 PM
 
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And it was not just the fact that they could not apply for fishing rights. Even if they could, fish do not exactly swim up to the shore and jump in a basket. In order to fish (illegally as Ovcatto has pointed out and documented) you would need a Curragh or boat and also nets. When you are already going hungry, being taxed to death, have a family to feed, and own only one badly worn set of clothes, how exactly would they pay for the materials?

To think that these people simply sat down and said "I'm starving and I am not going to help myself or my family because I am lazy" is ludicrious and an insult to the Irish people. The Irish Famine was a genocide perpetrated by the British on the Irish people, pure and simple.
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Old 03-01-2010, 09:19 PM
 
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I have read that certain landlords would actually buy tickets for them to leave.
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Old 03-02-2010, 03:46 AM
 
Location: Peterborough, England
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Originally Posted by Randomstudent View Post
And many of those that could just pick up ended up booking it to America instead.

Or to Britain. After all, it was a lot nearer.

Iirc, most Catholics in the United Kingdom today are descended from 19C Irish immigrants. They just haven't had as much publicity as the ones who crossed the Atlantic.
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Old 03-02-2010, 04:15 AM
Status: "Wanting a cinnamon cupcake." (set 1 hour ago)
 
Location: then: U.S.A., now: Europe
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Originally Posted by Randomstudent View Post
And many of those that could just pick up ended up booking it to America instead.
And many to Ontario, Canada as well.
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Old 03-02-2010, 06:05 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
And many to Ontario, Canada as well.
And Australia.

Origins: History of immigration from Ireland - Immigration Museum, Melbourne Australia
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Old 03-02-2010, 06:58 AM
 
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Because they ran out of beer
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