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Old 01-16-2022, 10:04 AM
 
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I'd like to try to do a DIY project using some plans you can buy online. It calls for the use of a jointer to mill the wood so that it is perfectly flat with no bows/twists. Would one of those 6-8" benchtop jointers that you can buy for a few hundred $ be sufficient for 90% of DIY projects? In the video tutorials, he's clearly using a much larger jointer in a workshop. I simply do not have the space for a professional grade joiner, and I wouldn't want to spend that much money on one because I'm just a complete novice and a beginner. If I have a piece of wood that's say bigger than 6", can I still use a 6" benchtop jointer by doing one side and then doing the other side after? Or would that not work? Can you even buy perfectly jointed wood to do the project?
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Old 01-16-2022, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Idaho
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Originally Posted by fibonacci View Post
Can you even buy perfectly jointed wood to do the project?
I think it's impossible to find already-made perfectly jointed wood. After much research, we decided to get this jointer/planer last year at Home Depot when it was on sale for $599. The current price is $799 so you may want to wait for a sale.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-6...0610/202269174

We are very happy with this jointer/planer. It does not take up a lot of space and definitely much more stable, sturdier and easier to use than bench top models.
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Old 01-16-2022, 12:49 PM
 
4,503 posts, read 4,662,480 times
Reputation: 6246
Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaDL View Post
I think it's impossible to find already-made perfectly jointed wood. After much research, we decided to get this jointer/planer last year at Home Depot when it was on sale for $599. The current price is $799 so you may want to wait for a sale.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-6...0610/202269174

We are very happy with this jointer/planer. It does not take up a lot of space and definitely much more stable, sturdier and easier to use than bench top models.


It says the max width is about 6". Really dumb question - if I have a board that's say 10" in width, could I do 6" of the face of the board, turn it 180 degrees and then joint the other 4" of the face? Logically I cannot see anything wrong with doing that. Is there anything wrong in terms of craftsmanship for doing that?
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Old 01-16-2022, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Idaho
2,015 posts, read 1,714,675 times
Reputation: 7920
Quote:
Originally Posted by fibonacci View Post
It says the max width is about 6". Really dumb question - if I have a board that's say 10" in width, could I do 6" of the face of the board, turn it 180 degrees and then joint the other 4" of the face?
You may want to watch this youtube video: "How to Joint Boards Wider than Your Jointer -- WOOD magazine"


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vOENDdFIJM
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Old 10-12-2022, 09:21 AM
 
931 posts, read 307,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fibonacci View Post
It says the max width is about 6". Really dumb question - if I have a board that's say 10" in width, could I do 6" of the face of the board, turn it 180 degrees and then joint the other 4" of the face? Logically I cannot see anything wrong with doing that. Is there anything wrong in terms of craftsmanship for doing that?
You can do that if you don't value your fingers. To joint wider boards on a 6" planer, you have to remove the guard. It will work until the day it backfires and causes an injury. When that jointer takes off some wood, look at the shavings and imagine your fingers instead. They won't have anything to reattach.

If you want to joint a 10" board with a 6" planer, rip the board into two 5" joint the reference sides and do a glue up then plane the other edges. Table saws are to be respected. Routers, planers and jointers are to be feared.

Be safe first, and productive second.
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