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Old 02-04-2012, 11:43 AM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,611 posts, read 7,005,258 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by South Jersey Styx View Post
This looks alot like my house, except we're solid brick, elephantine columns, and the front porch is all brick (base and rail- area).

But, yeah, that's the typical layout -- we even have the fireplace in the same spot as the pic, full front porch, and a green (metal) roof! And Our porch roof has a rooftop deck with colonial-balusters and a French door in the middle of the 2d floor.

Funny to see this is in an Old House Tour but not because of its beauty and quality. I live in a historic town who has an annual Holiday Historic House Tour and Arts & Crafts houses are not on the tour. It's usually anything from the 1700s thru about 1910. I guess we're older on the East Coast so "Old House" means the colonial thru Victorian era.

Thanks for sharing!
Your house sounds great!

Yeah, what is considered historic in one part of the country (or world) is certainly different than in others. We have great friends who live in a 1765 home in Newburyport Mass, and the house next door to them (now, a live-in museum) was built in 1620!
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Old 02-04-2012, 12:15 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,431 posts, read 21,585,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Simplicity at its finest. I'd like to live in one myself.
Ohio girl your state is FULL of beautiful Foursquares at very reasonable prices! There are some lovely examples in the North Hills neighborhood of Youngstown. Also, many bungalows, prairie and mission homes.

Most WAY under 100K!
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Old 02-04-2012, 12:22 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
The shown kit home is beautiful but I think it's a little more embellished than your typical foursquare- this is what I think of when referencing American Foursquare. Very handsome, honest architecture.

http://www.oldhouseonline.com/wp-con...quare1-967.jpg

Here is an great example of an American Foursquare in my neighborhood that was on tour. The inside is absolutely stunning in it's simplicity and craftsmanship.


The Old House Fair - YouTube
The first example seemed pretty typical to me, with the exception of the roofline. Usually they have a hipped roof.

The link was fun! Do they have this every year? Where was this?
Thanks for sharing!
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Old 02-06-2012, 09:20 PM
 
5,703 posts, read 15,401,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
I will always love the grace and contrived elegance of Victorian home, but lately I have found my self attracted to the austere simplicity of the American Foursquare. The honest modernity, couples with the still nostalgic use of stained glass windows, built-ins, book shelves and fireplaces, this homes seems to be truly an American original.

Does anyone else have one? Or share my fascination for them?

Does anyone have any resources for exterior colors, interior restoration and the like?

Any information would be helpful.
I adore american foursquare!! I love how balanced they look. I wish I owned one.
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Old 02-12-2012, 06:57 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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It might be the Libra in me, but I love the balanced, simple style myself. I don't want to jinx anything, but we might have found one!

Purists might disagree, but I think that the style lends itself to eclectic decorating. From Mission to Mid-Century Modern. Those two styles seem to work well. Clean, efficient, and functional. Yet I can also see art deco working well in these homes. Really, anything 20s, 30s, 40, and 50s.

I know that the temptation exists for many to take these homes down "country roads" - many that we are looking at are adorned with eagles, over stuffed brown sofas, country blue walls, oak rocking chairs and assorted Americana.

Not my taste. I have a whole other vision...
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Old 02-13-2012, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,077 posts, read 56,991,082 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
I'll take a Foursquare anyday!
My favorite is a Sears Kit house. It was called the Magnolia.
That looks more like a twelvesquare. LOL
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Old 02-13-2012, 11:55 AM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,431 posts, read 21,585,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
That looks more like a twelvesquare. LOL
Ohiogirl, where can I see your favorite the Magnolia?

Twelve Square HaHa!!! It does!
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Old 02-13-2012, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,077 posts, read 56,991,082 times
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I re-counted; if you don't count the attic window (and I don't think you do), or the one-story room off to the right, it's a tensquare!

This is what I think of when I think of a foursquare, and most of the ones I'm familiar with aren't this fancy:

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Old 02-13-2012, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,758 posts, read 7,303,044 times
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I've always liked all old houses. (as I'm sure we all do in our own way) But, I didn't really appreciate the American Foursquare until I actually moved into a city where they are very common.

Many of the houses in Youngstown are like foursquares, except that most have gabled roofs instead of hipped roofs. Their floorplan--which is part of where the foursquare gets its name--is generally the same.
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Old 02-13-2012, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
11,788 posts, read 45,307,231 times
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Ohiogirl-
That image appears to be the Hillrose (Sears kit home)- or at least a very close.
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