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Old 02-13-2012, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
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Now that I look at it again-
It's a model no. 52
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Old 02-13-2012, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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I like the first one better, as long as it comes with the car, the sheep, the barn and the windmill.

Are those extra?
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Old 02-13-2012, 05:07 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I re-counted; if you don't count the attic window (and I don't think you do), or the one-story room off to the right, it's a tensquare!

This is what I think of when I think of a foursquare, and most of the ones I'm familiar with aren't this fancy:
That's a beauty! Does anyone know of a book with plans for kit homes? Such as Sears, Aladdin, etc. I look pour through that for hours!
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Old 02-13-2012, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
That's a beauty! Does anyone know of a book with plans for kit homes? Such as Sears, Aladdin, etc. I look pour through that for hours!
Read my 1st post in this thread- again
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Old 02-14-2012, 07:00 AM
 
Location: In the woods
3,314 posts, read 8,514,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
Now that I look at it again-
It's a model no. 52
I love how the ad says
". . .don't pay an architect $100 or $150 for plans to . . . ."

Someone on the Forum wrote a book about Sears Kit Houses. Very knowledgeable. Was that you K'ledgeBldr?
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Old 02-14-2012, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
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Here's a modern interpretation of the foursquare-
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Old 02-14-2012, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
11,879 posts, read 45,713,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by South Jersey Styx View Post
Was that you K'ledgeBldr?

No, not me-
As I stated in my first post-
"Rosemary Thorton is an avid Sears kit home historian. She has published at least one book on the subject and is a C-D member (RosemaryT)."
Here's her website-
http://www.searshomes.org/
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Old 02-15-2012, 09:32 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Were most or all foursquare homes kit built?

Also, at least in my region, these homes seem to have been built by the moderately wealthy - the upper middle class. Yet I hear some sources refer to them as "pedestrian" or "common" Which does not sound very upper middle class. I think that for the most part they were built for people who had a bit of money - but not a flamboyant amount. Such as small business owners, shop keepers, doctors, farmers, members of the clergy, and attorneys. In fact, I have noticed that quite a few were built as parsonages.
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Old 02-16-2012, 06:10 AM
 
Location: In the woods
3,314 posts, read 8,514,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Were most or all foursquare homes kit built?

Also, at least in my region, these homes seem to have been built by the moderately wealthy - the upper middle class. Yet I hear some sources refer to them as "pedestrian" or "common" Which does not sound very upper middle class. I think that for the most part they were built for people who had a bit of money - but not a flamboyant amount. Such as small business owners, shop keepers, doctors, farmers, members of the clergy, and attorneys. In fact, I have noticed that quite a few were built as parsonages.
Interesting question. Since our Foursquare had been built and owned by the same family (2-3 generations lived here prior to us), we knew who built it. The owner was indeed, a small business owner -- owned a restaurant in town.
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Old 02-16-2012, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,178 posts, read 57,317,340 times
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Most of the foursquares I'm familiar with were built for people of very modest means -- factory workers, shop workers, etc.

The neighborhood that is now the University of Dayton student ghetto is full of 'em. The neighborhood was built between 1900 and 1930 for people who worked at NCR, and even has its own Wikipedia page: University of Dayton Ghetto - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A lot of those houses have been beat up in the past 40 years -- back in my day, private landlords didn't keep up the houses very well, and it wasn't unusual for a floor or a porch to collapse under the weight of dancing students! -- and the University slowly has bought most of the privately owned homes, and either is renovating them or replacing the worst of them.

Last edited by Ohiogirl81; 02-16-2012 at 06:59 AM..
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