U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House > Home Interior Design and Decorating
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-01-2012, 10:03 PM
 
11,100 posts, read 9,745,964 times
Reputation: 16475

Advertisements

I will always love the grace and contrived elegance of Victorian home, but lately I have found my self attracted to the austere simplicity of the American Foursquare. The honest modernity, couples with the still nostalgic use of stained glass windows, built-ins, book shelves and fireplaces, this homes seems to be truly an American original.

Does anyone else have one? Or share my fascination for them?

Does anyone have any resources for exterior colors, interior restoration and the like?

Any information would be helpful.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-02-2012, 07:41 AM
 
Location: southwestern PA... where the nest is now empty!
12,126 posts, read 14,261,641 times
Reputation: 18586
check out American Bungalow magazine
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2012, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,838 posts, read 21,974,933 times
Reputation: 5359
I'll take a Foursquare anyday!
My favorite is a Sears Kit house. It was called the Magnolia.



It's a shame it can't be built for that price today!
I would love to build a reproduction of this exact house- and there is very little I would change from it's original plan.

Rosemary Thorton is an avid Sears kit home historian. She has published at least one book on the subject and is a C-D member (RosemaryT).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2012, 05:03 PM
 
11,100 posts, read 9,745,964 times
Reputation: 16475
This home is awesome! I know what you mean, too bad we can't go back in time and purchase the home at that price, with all of those great old materials, and have it built now.

I'd be very interested in reading that book. I'll look for it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2012, 08:57 PM
 
Location: In the woods
3,286 posts, read 5,239,541 times
Reputation: 1414
We own one -- 1930s, solid brick, elephantine columns, lots of woodwork, pocket doors, fireplace, french doors, hardwood floors, large windows, etc.

We looked at Victorians when house-hunting I didn't like the exterior upkeep and some had really strange layouts. We finally decided on this one. It was in really good condition.

We absolutely love it. BTW, there are many variations on the American Foursquare. Good luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2012, 01:45 AM
 
11,100 posts, read 9,745,964 times
Reputation: 16475
South Jersey Styx, I agree. The American Foursquare has a very livable layout. Open - but not too open. For me in is the Golden Mean between the circuitous and claustrophobic rooms of the Victorian, and the much touted "Open Concept" (AKA THE UNI-ROOM) that seems so much in favor today.

Happy that you have found your dream home! It sounds like a sturdy beauty!

This year? I shall find my own!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2012, 02:36 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
10,201 posts, read 7,732,954 times
Reputation: 8527
My house was built from a kit in 1930. The inside walls are about ten inches thick. Outside walls thicker. Its a simple 'shotgun' style houlse and its small by today's normal measure (not by the 50's) but I love it since its got this practical sturdyness. I'll take it over any 'mansion'. I don't need a huge house. I love the sense of a series of generations living within its walls, a few of which haven't left though they seem happy to have me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2012, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Far from where I'd like to be
25,602 posts, read 32,377,539 times
Reputation: 37710
Simplicity at its finest. I'd like to live in one myself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2012, 12:51 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
2,528 posts, read 3,212,821 times
Reputation: 3453
The shown kit home is beautiful but I think it's a little more embellished than your typical foursquare- this is what I think of when referencing American Foursquare. Very handsome, honest architecture.

http://www.oldhouseonline.com/wp-con...quare1-967.jpg

Here is an great example of an American Foursquare in my neighborhood that was on tour. The inside is absolutely stunning in it's simplicity and craftsmanship.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tmjwk65Syoo

Last edited by T. Damon; 02-03-2012 at 01:47 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-04-2012, 11:42 AM
 
Location: In the woods
3,286 posts, read 5,239,541 times
Reputation: 1414
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
The shown kit home is beautiful but I think it's a little more embellished than your typical foursquare- this is what I think of when referencing American Foursquare. Very handsome, honest architecture. http://www.oldhouseonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/AmerFoursquare1-967.jpg
This looks alot like my house, except we're solid brick, elephantine columns, and the front porch is all brick (base and rail- area).

But, yeah, that's the typical layout -- we even have the fireplace in the same spot as the pic, full front porch, and a green (metal) roof! And Our porch roof has a rooftop deck with colonial-balusters and a French door in the middle of the 2d floor.

Quote:
Here is an great example of an American Foursquare in my neighborhood that was on tour. The inside is absolutely stunning in it's simplicity and craftsmanship.
Funny to see this is in an Old House Tour but not because of its beauty and quality. I live in a historic town who has an annual Holiday Historic House Tour and Arts & Crafts houses are not on the tour. It's usually anything from the 1700s thru about 1910. I guess we're older on the East Coast so "Old House" means the colonial thru Victorian era.

Thanks for sharing!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House > Home Interior Design and Decorating
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top