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Old 04-24-2014, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
11,879 posts, read 45,713,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artking09 View Post
Thanks for the advice.

One more thing, We need to repaint certain walls, not all the house. Which job should come first, painting or installing hardwood floor?
I'll answer your question, with a "but"-
If you paint first, the walls will surely get dinged or smudged while the flooring is going in. It can also get a little stain or poly while being finished- not a big deal, but it happens. So, depending on the paint you choose you may have to repaint a whole wall if touch ups show.
My advice, do the paint last- you can always cover the floor with rosin paper and drop cloths.

Here's the "But"!
New house, you'll have an eleven month (1yr warranty)walk-through to fix/repair any items that show up during your first year of residence. Drywall nail/screw pops will inevitably show up along with other minor drywall issues. So, if any of these issues appear on walls you painted AFTER closing; the builder is not going to, nor is his obligated to repaint any drywall repairs done on those walls.

As much as it may pain you you're better off not painting until the one year warranty has past. Otherwise, you maybe painting them twice.
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Old 04-25-2014, 12:17 PM
 
6,014 posts, read 2,700,501 times
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I agree with oak. The oak floors in the 40 year old house I just sold looked far better than many new floors I've seen of other more exotic wood choices especially when they are stained very dark. I know people who have whole kits of floor pens/furniture polish and daily rituals for dealing with their scratches. Not to mention their angst should a shoe touch the floor or a pet or a childs toy. Nuts for something that should be able to take a beating.

Color is a personal preference; I don't care for the natural oak look, so I stained mine a medium dark shade with a matte finish which hides scratches better. The heavy graining of oak also tends to hide scratches better imo.

Three weeks is optimistic imo for installation and site finishing. Probably can be done, but the fumes will linger after you move in and can be really bad depending how sensitive you are to them.
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Old 04-25-2014, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
18,870 posts, read 12,490,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artking09 View Post
Thanks for the advice.

One more thing, We need to repaint certain walls, not all the house. Which job should come first, painting or installing hardwood floor?
Ask the installer. We we restained, we were advised to have the interior painted first. That's what we did, and it worked out fine. With the restain they had to sand, so they knew how to contain the debris kicked up by the sander.

Your hardwood guy will know best. Rely on him for the timeline.
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Old 04-26-2014, 06:33 PM
 
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Looking at Lumber Liquidators site they have 100 year transferable warranty for some of their higher end hardwood products like Bellawood brand. Is it important to have a warranty for real hardwood? Looks like thats baked into the cost as well.
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Old 05-14-2014, 11:07 AM
 
202 posts, read 470,658 times
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I found a hardwood floor contractor to do an estimate yesterday. He said 90% of his works use water-based Poly, and he recommend Bona Traffic for its durability and low odor/toxicity. How is this brand? For oil-based Poly, he uses LexaMar brand. How is this product? From Internet, this company makes poly coating for auto parts.


This project is really costly. adding labor (remove carpet, install, sand, stain, finish) + lumber (white oak), it is a little more than $10 per sq. ft. I am not complaining, just want to check if it is reasonable.

Thanks.
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Old 05-14-2014, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
11,879 posts, read 45,713,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artking09 View Post
hardwood floor ...water-based Poly...

If I've said it once, I've said it a 100 times+: "Water and Hardwood Flooring DON'T Go Together!" No way; no how. The logic is just not there.
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Old 05-14-2014, 08:08 PM
 
6,014 posts, read 2,700,501 times
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Oil vs water based polyurethane:Which is better for refinishing wood?


This gives a good explanation of why oil based poly is better than water based.
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Old 05-15-2014, 06:35 AM
 
202 posts, read 470,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blondy View Post
Oil vs water based polyurethane:Which is better for refinishing wood?


This gives a good explanation of why oil based poly is better than water based.
Thanks, this is very informative.
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Old 12-30-2014, 10:02 AM
 
1,282 posts, read 3,245,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
If I've said it once, I've said it a 100 times+: "Water and Hardwood Flooring DON'T Go Together!" No way; no how. The logic is just not there.
I decided to go with the water-based poly (Bona Traffic) for a number of reasons:

1. Several contractors, as well as the hardwood floor manufacturer, highly recommended this product over oil-based poly.
2. I wanted a natural look for my light, hickory flooring; oil-based poly, from my experience, causes a really unattractive yellowing over time. My beautiful natural maple floors in my last house developed an ugly yellowish tint after awhile.

I have to say, the look of these floors well exceeded my expectations; they are the most beautiful floors I have ever seen: absolutely clear and natural, and you can see every detail of the grain, which I love. I"m not sure about the durability aspect yet, because it's literally only been a week. They put a sealer coat + 2 additional coats. We'll see.
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