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Old 02-20-2010, 06:04 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
813 posts, read 1,732,065 times
Reputation: 585

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Planning on having the oak floors redone in our 30+ year old home, and would like to know what the best sealer is.

We have a yellow lab, and my wife is looking to use a waterbased finished, and I'm from the old school and believe that a poly based finish will be better.

So, what do you pros, or homeowners recommend from your experiences.

Thank you,....marc
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Old 02-22-2010, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,854 posts, read 22,094,858 times
Reputation: 5383
I can satisfy you both: water-based polyurethane.

Your differences- water-based: less fumes, faster drying, not quite as hard a finish.
Multiple coats can generally be done in a 24hr turn around.
oil based: A lot of fumes, slower drying, much harder finish. Multiple coats take
more overall time.
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Old 02-22-2010, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Houston, Texas
10,427 posts, read 30,089,411 times
Reputation: 9667
Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
I can satisfy you both: water-based polyurethane.

Your differences- water-based: less fumes, faster drying, not quite as hard a finish.
Multiple coats can generally be done in a 24hr turn around.
oil based: A lot of fumes, slower drying, much harder finish. Multiple coats take
more overall time.
Remember years ago when Fabulon was the best floor sealer on the market? Geez ya had to evacuate the entire neighborhood the fumes were so bad.

I agree, use water based poly.
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Old 02-23-2010, 12:46 PM
 
3 posts, read 87,803 times
Reputation: 13
Default Oak floors

Quote:
Originally Posted by marc515 View Post
Planning on having the oak floors redone in our 30+ year old home, and would like to know what the best sealer is.

We have a yellow lab, and my wife is looking to use a waterbased finished, and I'm from the old school and believe that a poly based finish will be better.

So, what do you pros, or homeowners recommend from your experiences.

Thank you,....marc
Marc your question is a very good one , but one thing I noticed is you have a dog!,which is fine If you maintain the dogs nails on a regular basis. however,regular walks with the dog may keep these in check. its been my observation over the last 25 years of being in the hardwood flooring business that "NO PolyUrethane" will hold up to the daily foot traffic of dogs. Remember "POLY-Urethane" is just liquid plastic. under no circumstances will manufacturers warrant the products against animals. another thing to remember "Commmon-Sense-cleaning" Wood flooring is always,and will always seek out and ajust to moisture exsposure.Remember it was once a "TREE" Outside in the elements. we humans brought indoors. and still to this day are having problems trying to control a natural Material in our environment. As far as Finishes go Im an Oil man Thru an Thru, But the recent changeover to Waterbourne Finishes of the Commercial level,available in all 3 sheens has sold me.
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Old 02-23-2010, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,854 posts, read 22,094,858 times
Reputation: 5383
Quote:
Originally Posted by ernestb3439 View Post
we humans brought indoors. and still to this day are having problems trying to control a natural Material in our environment.
The real "problem" is not understanding that natural materials behave in natural ways.
I've tried to explain it in so many different ways that I'm practically blue in the face! And it's not just h'woods. It's granite, framing, d/wall, interior trim- ya get the idea?
Nine times outta ten- they're standing there saying to themselves: "If he thinks he's going to pull the wool over my eyes..."
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Old 02-23-2010, 09:27 PM
 
3 posts, read 87,803 times
Reputation: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
The real "problem" is not understanding that natural materials behave in natural ways.
I've tried to explain it in so many different ways that I'm practically blue in the face! And it's not just h'woods. It's granite, framing, d/wall, interior trim- ya get the idea?
Nine times outta ten- they're standing there saying to themselves: "If he thinks he's going to pull the wool over my eyes..."
How True you are!!! half the time I find myself giving mini crash courses on the working properties of hardwood flooring in the home and trying to give hands-on jobsite scenerios in under an hour , when im there giving an estimate.
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Old 02-23-2010, 10:33 PM
 
8,337 posts, read 22,614,083 times
Reputation: 8100
I've long moved up from the polyurethanes ... and even the latest very tough water-based polyurethanes ....

to clear polyaspartics. No smells, no volatile solvents, very user friendly to install, can put down 15 mils or so per coat (and I'd use three coats in a high abuse area) with very short times for overcoat windows.

Faster curing, much tougher than the urethanes, more durable, higher gloss, and much more scratch, chemical, and abrasive resistant.

Check with your commercial/industrial coatings supplier or your flooring contractor about this stuff. It's a bit more pricey per gallon than a two-part catalyzed polyurethane (the prior "gold standard" for durability in this type of stuff), but well worth the slight product upcharge. It's so much easier and quicker to install that the net cost of a floor with it may even be less than a polyurethane because the contractor doesn't have to make repeat trips to do the install, it's that quick curing.
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Old 02-24-2010, 12:59 PM
 
3 posts, read 87,803 times
Reputation: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
I've long moved up from the polyurethanes ... and even the latest very tough water-based polyurethanes ....

to clear polyaspartics. No smells, no volatile solvents, very user friendly to install, can put down 15 mils or so per coat (and I'd use three coats in a high abuse area) with very short times for overcoat windows.

Faster curing, much tougher than the urethanes, more durable, higher gloss, and much more scratch, chemical, and abrasive resistant.

Check with your commercial/industrial coatings supplier or your flooring contractor about this stuff. It's a bit more pricey per gallon than a two-part catalyzed polyurethane (the prior "gold standard" for durability in this type of stuff), but well worth the slight product upcharge. It's so much easier and quicker to install that the net cost of a floor with it may even be less than a polyurethane because the contractor doesn't have to make repeat trips to do the install, it's that quick curing.
this is a fine substitute if you have concrete floors but unlike concrete we now have to add in the fact that in the home we have to deal with the fact of exspansion an contraction of the wood thru the seasons thus running the risk of chipping or flaking @ all the seams in flooring especially @ all the head joints,I dont believe that you find this in concrete floors because of the solid surface and rate of exspansion an contraction differs. it would be fantastic if the wood did not move . Remember also Designed for concrete most homeowners also are not certified in the application of floor finishes,Chemical Coatings, Safety Issues, fire Hazards, proper ventilation methods, traffic control, Dust containment,Waste removal., all while still trying to live in the home an continuing thier daily routine. Im rambling Sorry!!!!!

Last edited by ernestb3439; 02-24-2010 at 01:13 PM..
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Old 07-03-2011, 09:53 AM
 
2 posts, read 29,235 times
Reputation: 11
Default Lesson Learned!

I read posts and decided there was no risk in using oil based for my red oak floors and the only downside was the drying time. On the plus side I was excited for the natural amber color the oil based would bring to my floors. Noone told me that in recent years the formula of the oil based has changed to lower the fumes == which in turn causes more air bubbles!! Although the air bubbles were more like pimples in the floor I could not live with it, apparently some people don't take notice of these things so do some it may not be an issue. In the same month I had my floors refinished down to the hardwood for a second time and went with the water based...I will now wait for the floors to darken naturally over time but I am much more satisfied with the smooth finish : )
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Old 07-04-2011, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,854 posts, read 22,094,858 times
Reputation: 5383
Quote:
Originally Posted by simple_life3 View Post
No one told me that in recent years the formula of the oil based has changed to lower the fumes == which in turn causes more air bubbles!!
Lower VOC's don't create air bubbles.
Floor finishers that don't know what the Hell they're doin' create air bubbles!
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