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Old 05-19-2010, 10:11 AM
 
206 posts, read 482,830 times
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We upgraded to a Satin/eggshell finish for our interior paint b/c we have 2 young kids. There are noticeable streaks on some of the walls which our builder is saying is due to the paint type. We paid extra for this upgrade. We are also being told most builders will only use "flat" because of running into this issue. Any advice or thoughts on how this should be handled? Is this really common with satin/eggshell paint?
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Old 05-19-2010, 10:59 AM
 
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I believe the phenomenon you are describing is "glossing out", and yeah it can happen, especially with semi-gloss and gloss paints.

But a skilled contractor should not have this issue (its more of a DIY problem). It is standard to use semi-gloss in bathrooms and kitchens (and laundry rooms, and mud rooms....) and contractors the world over manage to paint these rooms without streaking.

Advice on how to handle it....I guess I would try to talk to someone in management and the builder/developer's company, not just the site superintendent. And perhaps get a second opinion, from another contractor. Not sure, but there may be an insurance policy on the building that would be able to work on your behalf? Or maybe it would be cheaper/easier to just hire someone else to redo it.

Good luck.

Last edited by kodaka; 05-19-2010 at 11:50 AM..
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Old 05-19-2010, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Pomona
1,955 posts, read 5,462,956 times
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Sounds more like the painters didn't mix/apply it evenly. They love flat because there's no luster to bring out any deficiencies.

They did an unsatisfactory job. Ask for a repaint.
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Old 05-19-2010, 02:11 PM
 
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I painted my whole house satin sheen and I dont have any "streaky-ness". whats that look like? they probably used thinned out paint or something
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Old 05-19-2010, 02:14 PM
 
Location: 3814′45″N 12237′53″W
4,153 posts, read 6,736,741 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveArmy View Post
I painted my whole house satin sheen and I dont have any "streaky-ness". whats that look like? they probably used thinned out paint or something
Yeah, I'm going to second that idea...builders "save" money all over the place, even to the point of watering down the paint and then blaming the customer's request.

A repaint is in order, with un-thinned paint.
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Old 05-19-2010, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
6,857 posts, read 22,125,962 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bellalunatic View Post
Yeah, I'm going to second that idea...builders "save" money all over the place, even to the point of watering down the paint and then blaming the customer's request.

A repaint is in order, with un-thinned paint.

Another one-
Just blame it on the builder- if one's a cheap ass, they all are, right?

A builder pays a set price to a painter (subcontractor) for painting the house. The painter doesn't get paid 100% until the house is 100% complete- signed off.
So, if the painter wants to cheap out and thin the paint to improve his profit margin- with a very good chance he'll have to paint it all over again, he can try it but, I think not!
After 15+yrs I never seen a painter "thin" paint- especially latex.
I did have one painter that was conscientious of waste- he would take all the left over interior flat, and combine them in 5gal buckets and use it to spray prime the d/wall and trim.
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Old 05-19-2010, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Northwest Indiana
691 posts, read 1,301,325 times
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Streaking in semi-gloss and gloss paint in new construction (or new drywall) is a common problem.

The reason why?

The surface of new walls made of drywall are basically composed of TWO materials. The drywall sheets are one, the joint compound in the taped areas are the second. They absorb paint differently resulting in the streaking. Notice that the taped areas of the wall can be far smoother then the areas that are just drywall.

Flat paint is far more forgiving so you really don't see the streaking (its still there). That's why the majority of builders don't paint with semi or gloss paints. Or they charge far more for semi or gloss paint (if they are going to do it correctly).

I had a buyer that wanted gloss paint in his new home. The builder told him a upgrade price of $2500 (it was about a 1600 sq. ft house). He questions why it costs so much extra (since gloss paint basically cost the same as flat) . They tell him that if they just paint the new drywall it will be streaky and wavy. They solve the problem by skim coating the drywall (basically a veneer plaster). So I give that builder credit for being honest about it and educating my buyer about it. I guess your builder wasn't.

The only way to have glossy paint is to either do that or wait until there are several coats of paint on those walls. At that point you are painting paint rather then drywall. A new house may only have two coats on it (the primer and the top coat). Most builders won't see any pay back on painting more. Most buyer won't know the difference between two coats or three or more. So they don't.
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Old 05-19-2010, 05:37 PM
 
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I dont get it, there should be some texture layer on drywall, no? that should be thick enough to even out the painting surface

Last edited by SteveArmy; 05-19-2010 at 05:47 PM..
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Old 05-19-2010, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Northwest Indiana
691 posts, read 1,301,325 times
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The drywall has a texture and absorbs paint, but the joint compound doesn't, its smoother and harder, so the paint runs. Most of the streaks are where the joints are.
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Old 05-20-2010, 12:57 AM
 
1,474 posts, read 2,772,942 times
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joint compound is porous and not that hard, i work with it many times. I'm actually fixing a ceiling now from a minor leak.
maybe the joint compound is so thin its getting to the joint tape?
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