U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive > Brand-specific forums > Honda and Acura
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-12-2017, 07:50 AM
Status: "Mowin the lawn at 0330" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Cleaning CAT VOMIT out of radiators
2,198 posts, read 847,532 times
Reputation: 1653

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by A.Typical.Girl View Post
My 2011 CR-V owners manual says my tire pressure should be 30. I had service at a dealership 6-mos ago & they adjusted the pressure to 35. What I noticed immediately, is I much prefer driving with the pressure at 35... I feel I get better road traction.

This Honda site says the pressure can be from 30-44 on a 2017 car, but the higher pressure should be used in cold weather. I couldn't find an article of the 2011 SUV.

2017 Honda CR-V recommended tire pressure - Planet Honda

So my q's:

* Does the year of car matter? Isn't the pressure determined by the tires, not make/model/year of car?
* I'm in SoFla now, so given the heat, can I safely bump up the pressure to 35?
* My tires are about 1-1/2 yrs old. As the tires age, does the pressure need to be adjusted up or down or is that determined by weather conditions/heat-cold/humidity?

The pressure's back to 30 now & I wanted to ask before adjusting to 35.

Thank you very much!

Actually, the opposite would apply: Keep tires closer to Honda's recommended cold pressure during warmer months, and add 2-3PSI during colder.

You may think the higher pressure in summer feels better, but here's an exercise to demonstrate why car manufacturers determine cold pressures much lower than the max on the tires themselves:


Stand with your bare feet on a slip-free surface. Concrete is a great example since it simulates road surfaces. Spread your feet slightly more apart than normal, and sway slowly back and forth, than faster, left, right, left, etc. Try to keep your bare feet fully on the ground as you continue swaying, and take note of the shapes of your feet as your weight shifts from one foot to the other.

See that?

That is why Honda(or Chevy, or Mercedes, or Chrysler, etc) posts recommended cold tire pressures either on your B-pillar or glove box or wherever.

If your feet - translate that to tires - did not flex as you observed, you(or your vehicle) would quickly lose contact with the surface, causing you to lose grip and control, and potentially,roll over!

Adding 1-2psi to those pressures is ok, but just remember that the more pressure you add, the less compliance your tires will exhibit, and what you observed with your feet when swaying back & forth. That compliance is what keeps you firmly planted in turns, either when running or driving. If it were possible for you to see just how much your tires changed shape and flexed while you were driving, you might be afraid to drive! Fear not, that is what the tires were engineered to do.

You may stop swaying now.

Last edited by TheGrandK-Man; 08-12-2017 at 08:24 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-12-2017, 08:37 AM
 
Location: North York
277 posts, read 231,959 times
Reputation: 456
I guess the Ford Explorer/Firestone debacle has faded from memory...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2017, 09:35 AM
Status: "Mowin the lawn at 0330" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Cleaning CAT VOMIT out of radiators
2,198 posts, read 847,532 times
Reputation: 1653
Quote:
Originally Posted by plmbpmp View Post
I guess the Ford Explorer/Firestone debacle has faded from memory...
Vehicle design had as much to do with that saga as did the relatively low cold tire pressures Ford recommended as a result of issues with said vehicle design, which was compensated for by selecting lower tire pressures.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2017, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Midwest
4,210 posts, read 7,109,796 times
Reputation: 7032
^^ Your feet have absolutely nothing to do with your tires. I've yet to read a car expert who decreased TP or ran their tires at 30. This is a case of more is better, to a point.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2017, 03:17 PM
Status: "Mowin the lawn at 0330" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Cleaning CAT VOMIT out of radiators
2,198 posts, read 847,532 times
Reputation: 1653
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dwatted Wabbit View Post
^^ Your feet have absolutely nothing to do with your tires. I've yet to read a car expert who decreased TP or ran their tires at 30. This is a case of more is better, to a point.
Learn what an analogy is. And practice the exercise yourself. Maybe it will then make sense to you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive > Brand-specific forums > Honda and Acura
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:13 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top